A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

ISBN: 1846378966
ISBN 13: 9781846378966
By: George Berkeley

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Reader's Thoughts

bill clausen

berkeley's arguments for immaterialism, "to be is to be perceived," fascinating take on philosophy of science and nature as the "language of god." beautiful, brief, if demanding.

Ben

The brilliance of Berkeley's philosophy is that it gave David Hume something to improve on, and it opened up whole new areas to doubt and critical observation. These two contributions are staggeringly important to our advancement in my opinion (the fact that the prose is crisp and witty is simply an added bonus). Nonetheless, in the present day Berkeley's philosophy seems fairly bizarre. After all, only a seasoned obscurantist would claim that matter doesn't exist all things (perceptions) that do exist do so in the form of ideas in 2013. This isn't to say many don't try, but Berkeley didn't have cognitive science, cosmology, chemistry, set theory, Einstein's Theory of Relativity, electromagnetism, artificial intelligence, or David Hume to assist his endeavor. For what was known at the time, Berkeley's ideas were unorthodox but prescient. The exaggerated claims of knowledge by natural philosophers at the time needed to be brought down. Berkeley assisted. The subjectivity of reality hadn't been fully realized. Berkeley helped us get there. Language matters, Berkeley noticed. Maybe most importantly, Berkeley partially cleared a path of doubt for Hume to later completely doubt. Nonetheless, Berkeley's philosophy suits his own beliefs too well (infinitely as a useless/chimerical concept, consciousness being an immaterial soul, the existence of an ideal state, the architect of reality as the Catholic God) and doesn't offer the 'clear proof' of god he thinks it does. His clear proof is nullified when the reliability of the ideas inside the human mind are called into question by Hume not too long after. Berkeley gets three stars (plus a half if it were available) because the work is an enjoyable and thought-provoking classic even if the ideas are dated, and although he helped move us forward, some of his ideas are quite obscurantist in nature meaning I can't fall head over heals for it despite my admiration for many of his thoughts.

eesenor

Berkeley radicalizes Locke's theories by arguing that all perception is only in the mind of the perceiver.

Julia

An interesting read.

Jake Yaniak

A short but incredibly important work of philosophy.

John

Entertaining and an easy read, I got a kick out of this. As a work of "philosophy" it leaves much to be desired, some of its assertions and conclusions are preposterous, but for 'laugh out loud' moments, it is hard to beat this as far as a work of 'serious' philosophy goes.

AmblingBooks

First published in 1710, George Berkeley's A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge is a seminal contribution to Empiricist philosophy. Making the bold assertion that the physical world consists only of ideas and thus does not exist outside the mind, this work establishes Berkeley as the founder of the immaterialist school of thought. A major influence on such later philosophers as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, Berkeley's ideas have played a role in such diverse fields as mathematics and metaphysics and continue to spark debate today.Listen to A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge on your smartphone, notebook or desktop computer.

pearl

Review forthcoming.

Cameron Davis

I gave this book three stars (rather than fewer) not because I agree with Berkeley's argument whatsoever or because his book is anything close to a model of careful, persuasive philosophy. I gave it three stars because:(1) As an argument for idealism, and the first I've ever read, it was fascinating.(2) Even though his argument for idealism is pretty lousy, the comprehensive philosophy he builds out of it--whereby he makes an, admittedly lousy, argument for God's existence and solves many dilemmas and paradoxes that have puzzled philosophers, scientists, and mathematicians throughout history--is impressively coherent and once again fascinating.Still, it gets no more than three stars because the argument for idealism is kind of careless, especially because Berkeley says ad nauseam that his position is so obviously right and his argument so compelling that it would be absurd to disagree. I actually found many of his points at the very beginning, for example that "our sensory experiences are only of ideas, not things external to us" compelling, but he drew some pretty careless inferences (e.g. nothing exists outside of our minds) from that pretty uncontroversial first premise. I guess the root of my disagreement with him is that I reject his likeness principle, which is the whole foundation of his attack against the representationalist theory of perception and thus his idealism. I call his argument careless because he provides no argument for this crucial principle and then goes on to insist repeatedly that no one can sanely reject his position. I also found uncompelling his response to one very important materialist claim, the claim that even if we can't know for sure that an external world exists, it is more likely that it does than does not. Berkeley responds by saying that because materialists cannot explain how external bodies would cause our ideas, we don't have good reason to accept the claim that an external world more likely exists than not. I don't think response this is very strong; I think there are strong reasons to believe it is more likely that external things cause our ideas than spirits, even if materialists cannot explain how this could happen.

Patrick

I would like a contemporary talk-walk in my garden. He would be a changed man.

Brian

Many of Berkeley's philosophical insights about sense, perception and the impossibility of "substance," published about 300 years ago, can sit comfortably and unrefuted alongside insights provided by modern quantum physics and mechanics. He was also a semiotician way before the field was invented. That's why I read this. It's the last edition he published in his life, and perhaps as a result, it's clear, concise (80 pages), and well-organized. Berkeley did not bloviate!Like many other Goodreads reviewers, I'm not fond of Berkeley's attachment to "God," but I also found it easy to just mentally substitute "Big Mystery" as I was going along, and didn't really see this as Christian apologetics, as some other reviewers have. I don't see why you can't read this atheistically or agnostically, and just go with his premise, grossly oversimplified, that our sense perception precedes the world of forms and things - of substance. Also, a petty aside: As someone who spends a lot of time in Berkeley, the next time someone in the area corrects my pronunciation of something, as they are wont to do -- how to say Chile, or how to pronounce the name of my typewriter (an Olivetti Lettera) as if I were Italian, I plan to enjoy informing them that they live in BARKLEE, not BERKLEE, and have been saying it wrong all this time.

Declan O'mahony

Okay, so someone tells you the world is all is in your mind. The world is an idea, nothing exists unless it is perceived by a mind. Crazy right? Well no - it just might be the case. We know Reality as a mental construct - a product of our minds. This book makes you think - what does it mean to exist, what is it, and that is a question worth looking at. George should be on everybody's self.

Noé Ajo caamaño

Ideas, y espíritus, es todo cuanto hay. Sin negar lo real y efectivo, convierte las cosas del mundo en ideas cuya existencia consiste en su ser percibido, percepción que revela al espíritu percipiente. Ser, lo más general; ideas, y espíritus. Y como no, como clave de bóveda, el gran espíritu, Dios, creador de la naturaleza (ideas que nos son entregadas por la percepción), y de la regularidad natural como muestra de su bondad de modo que podamos llegar a aprender a habérnoslas con esto real creado. Para terminar, no tiene empacho es suscribir alegremente una teodicea optimista por la cual el dolor contribuye a la belleza del mundo... Que bien! Ahora que tenemos guerras en África podremos apreciar tranquilamente la belleza de lo bello y la infinita bondad del gran espíritu. (¿Se nota el sarcasmo?).

Andrej Drapal

Extremely contemporary views on epistemology and ontology. He was quantum theoretician in his times.

Zac

3 dialogues is better.

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