Cien años de soledad

ISBN: 9871138148
ISBN 13: 9789871138142
By: Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez

Check Price Now

Genres

1001 Books Book Club Classics Fantasy Favourites Historical Fiction Latin America Literature Magic Realism Magical Realism

About this book

One of the 20th century's enduring works, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a widely beloved and acclaimed novel known throughout the world, and the ultimate achievement of a Nobel Prize winning career.The novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the family. It is a rich and brilliant chronicle of life and death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the noble, ridiculous, beautiful, and tawdry story of the family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.Love and lust, war and revolution, riches and poverty, youth and senility -- the variety of life, the endlessness of death, the search for peace and truth -- these universal themes dominate the novel. Whether he is describing an affair of passion or the voracity of capitalism and the corruption of government, Gabriel Garcia Marquez always writes with the simplicity, ease, and purity that are the mark of a master.Alternately reverential and comical, One Hundred Years of Solitude weaves the political, personal, and spiritual to bring a new consciousness to storytelling. Translated into dozens of languages, this stunning work is no less than an accounting of the history of the human race.

Reader's Thoughts

Laura

More like A Hundred Years of Torture. I read this partly in a misguided attempt to expand my literary horizons and partly because my uncle was a big fan of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Then again, he also used to re-read Ulysses for fun, which just goes to show that you should never take book advice from someone whose IQ is more than 30 points higher than your own.I have patience for a lot of excesses, like verbiage and chocolate, but not for 5000 pages featuring three generations of people with the same names. I finally tore out the family tree at the beginning of the book and used it as a bookmark! To be fair, the book isn’t actually 5000 pages, but also to be fair, the endlessly interwoven stories of bizarre exploits and fantastical phenomena make it seem like it is. The whole time I read it I thought, “This must be what it’s like to be stoned.” Well, actually most of the time I was just trying to keep the characters straight. The rest of the time I was wondering if I was the victim of odorless paint fumes. However, I think I was simply the victim of Marquez’s brand of magical realism, which I can take in short stories but find a bit much to swallow in a long novel. Again, to be fair, this novel is lauded and loved by many, and I can sort of see why. A shimmering panoramic of a village’s history would appeal to those who enjoy tragicomedy laced heavily with fantasy. It’s just way too heavily laced for me.

محمد سيد رشوان

قلت سابقًا .. هناك نوعين من الكُتاب .. والروائيين تحديدًا ..نوع يكتب عن نفسه ولنفسه ويستقى كل أعماله من حكاياته وتجاربه الذاتية .. بحيث أنه يجد فى الكتابة متنفسًا ويبث فيها همومه وأحزانه ، ويودعها مأساته وإحباطاته واكتئابه ..هذا النوع من الكُتاب ينتظر أن تضيف له الرواية .. لا أن يضيف هو لها ..وعلى الرغم من ذلك هناك تجارب صادقة تخرج ناضحة بمأساة حقيقية .. وتنز دماء ودموع صاحبهاوهناك تجارب أخرى فى هذا النوع قد لا تهم إلا صاحبها فما يسجلها فيها .. لا يعدو كونه دفتر مذكرات . أو يوميات ليس إلاأما النوع الثانىفهو ذلك الذى يكتب للإنسانية جميعًا .. يكتب لأن لديه شىءٌ ما؛ يؤرقه ويلح عليه ويطارده ..يكتب لأنه يريد أن يفيد البشرية بما يكتب .. أن يضيف إلى النتاج الروائى العالمى ..وعلى قدر من تكتب لهم على قدر من يقرأ لك .. فإن كتبت ابتغاء وجه الله ، سيقرأ لك كل مخاليق الله .. لذا ولنأخذ مثالًا أشهر من يكتب لنفسه وعن نفسه فى العالم هو هنرى ميللر ..من يعرفه ؟مئات ؟ آلاف ؟ عشرات الآلاف ؟؟ وربما هنرى ميللر تجربة فريدة من نوعها لأنه يكتب بمنتهى الصدق والفجاجة فغالبًا مايتماس مع مايقوله شيئًا عشناه ..لكن ماركيز مثلاً ..إنه يكتب عن الناس والبشر وتفاصيلهم وتواريخهم عن كيف عاشوا وكيف أحبوا ومارسوا الحب .. عن كيف أكلوا وكيف ارتحلوا وكيف ماتوالذلك يكتب لكل الناس .. فيقرأ له كل الناسولست هنا أقيس بالشهرة حرفية الكاتب ومدى صدقه .. ولكننى أقول أن م يهتم بالناس يهتم به الناس .. ومن يهتم بنفسه ويجعل منها محورًا لكتاباته ومركز كون أدبه سيهتم به أصدقاءه ومعارفه ممن هم حرىُّ بهم أن يتهموا به هذا عن نوعية الروائيين ..أما عن الرواية نفسها والتى هى بين أيدينا الآن ..فهى 500 صفحة من المتعة والنشوة وحبس الأنفاس ..رواية رائعة كما يتسنى للروعة أن تكون ..وأرفعها لمنزلة أنها من أفضل 10 روايات قرأتها وربما سأقرأها ..أنا أحب ماركيز .. وأحب طريقته فى الحكى .. وأحب كريم صديقى الذى يشترى هذة الأشياء ويعيرنى إياها حتى قبل أن يقرأها ..شكرًا♥♥

Adam

So I know that I'm supposed to like this book because it is a classic and by the same author who wrote Love in the Time of Cholera. Unfortunately, I just think it is unbelievably boring with a jagged plot that seems interminable. Sure, the language is interesting and the first line is the stuff of University English courses. Sometimes I think books get tagged with the "classic" label because some academics read them and didn't understand and so they hailed these books as genius. These same academics then make a sport of looking down their noses at readers who don't like these books for the very same reasons. (If this all sounds too specific, yes I had this conversation with a professor of mine).I know that other people love this book and more power to them, I've tried to read it all the way through three different times and never made it past 250 pages before I get so bored keeping up with all the births, deaths, magical events and mythical legends. I'll put it this way, I don't like this book for the same reason that I never took up smoking. If I have to force myself to like it, what's the point. When I start coughing and hacking on the first cigarette, that is my body telling me this isn't good for me and I should quit right there. When I start nodding off on the second page of One Hundred Years of Solitude that is my mind trying to tell me I should find a better way to pass my time.

Brian

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez is a tremendous piece of literature. It's not an easy read. You're not going to turn its pages like you would the latest John Grisham novel, or The DaVinci Code. You have to read each page, soaking up every word, immersing yourself in the imagery. Mr. Marquez says that he tells the story as his grandmother used to tell stories to him: with a brick face. That's useful to remember while reading, because that is certainly the tone the book takes. If you can get through the first 50 pages, you will enjoy it. But those 50 are a doozy. It's hard to keep track of the characters, at times (mainly because they are all named Jose Arcadio or Aureliano), but a family tree at the beginning of my edition was helpful. The book follows the Buendia family, from the founding of fictional Macondo to a fitting and fulfilling conclusion. The family goes through wars, marriages, many births and deaths, as well as several technological advances and invasions by gypsies and banana companies (trust me, the banana company is important). You begin to realize, as matriarch Ursula does, that as time passes, time does not really pass for this family, but turns in a circle. And as the circle closes on Macondo and the Buendias, you realize that Mr. Marquez has taken you on a remarkable journey in his literature. Recommended, but be prepared for a hard read.

Suzanne

My father-in-law loves this book so much that he gave me a copy for Christmas two years in a row. My father had already given me a copy years before. Lots of people I respect rave about this book; how it is a classic, a timeless work of genius, a brilliant critique of capitalism, etc. etc. I really want to share their enthusiasm; I want to be a member of the tribe that has read and loved this book, but I am ashamed to admit that I have never been able to finish it. I have tried to get through it several times. I have charted the family trees of the characters in order to keep track of the four-syllable names and incestuous couplings - but I get bored and frustrated with the meandering plot and give up half-way through every time. I keep thinking that maybe the end of the book, the part I've never been able to get to, is really great. There are certain things I do really like about the book, which is why I still gave it three stars, the writing is beautiful, but I think the book, as a whole, is overrated - either that, or I'm missing something, the last part of the book perhaps, that inspires the kind of passionate enthusiasm that people tend to have about the book and it's author. I've thought a lot about it on my stroller walks lately and I have come to the following conclusion: It's just not my genre. I prefer non-fiction and memoirs to fiction. The "magical realism" of García Márquez is too far out there for me - too fictional. I have enjoyed reading the commentary about the book far more than I have ever enjoyed the book. I have especially liked reading commentary about the book's allegorical meanings; readers who have linked this bizare work of fiction with fact, anchored the fictional town of Macondo to the places of García Márquez' childhood and the socio-political history of Columbia. Someone once told me that there are two types of people: those who believe there are two types of people and those who do not. I am a knitter. Knitters are often lumped into two groups: process knitters or project knitters. Project knitters knit to produce wearable functional garments. Process knitters knit just for the experience of knitting. I am a process knitter, but a product reader. I like to knit but I'm not really concerned with the finished product. I like to read, but my focus is what I get out of a book more than the experience of reading it. I like to learn something either about a real place, real person, or gain some insight about myself. I like my fiction to be realistic. "Magical realism" is not for me. Every time I read this book I ask myself, "Where is this going? What is the point," where, if I were a process reader, perhaps I'd be able to let all of that go and appreciate the lyrical nature of the book's beautiful writing. The cast of characters is too large. I think keeping track of all of them is a major distraction from the story. The plot is too abstract for me to grasp - and as much as I can appreciate the lyrical beauty of the language, I have never been able to get into this book.

Meg

I guarantee that 95% of you will hate this book, and at least 70% of you will hate it enough to not finish it, but I loved it. Guess I was just in the mood for it. Here's how it breaks down:AMAZING THINGS: I can literally feel new wrinkles spreading across the surface of my brain when I read this guy. He's so wicked smart that there's no chance he's completely sane. His adjectives and descriptions are 100% PERFECT, and yet entirely nonsensical. After reading three chapters, it starts making sense... and that's when you realize you're probably crazy, too. And you are. We all are.The magical realism style of the book is DELICIOUS. Sure, it's an epic tragedy following a long line of familial insanity, but that doesn't stop the people from eating dirt, coming back from the dead, spreading a plague of contagious insomnia, or enjoying a nice thunderstorm of yellow flowers. It's all presented in such a natural light that you think, "Of course. Of course he grows aquatic plants in his false teeth. Now why wouldn't he?"This guy is the epitome of unique. Give me a single sentence, ANY SENTENCE the man has ever written, and I will recognize it. Nobody writes like him. (Also, his sentences average about 1,438 words each, so pretty much it's either him or Faulkner)REASONS WHY MOST OF YOU WILL HATE THIS BOOK: I have to engage every ounce of my mental ability just to understand what the *@ is going on! Most people who read for relaxation and entertainment will want to send Marquez hate mail. Also, there are approximately 20 main characters and about 4 names that they all share. I realize that's probably realistic in Hispanic cultures of the era, but SERIOUSLY, by the time you get to the sixth character named Aureliano, you'll have to draw yourself a diagram. Not even the classic Russians suffer from as much name-confusion as this guy.On an uber-disturbing note, Marquez has once again (as he did in Love in the Time of Cholera) written a grown man having sex with a girl as young as 9... which is pretty much #1 on my list of "Things That Make You Go EWW!!!" He makes Lolita look like Polyanna on the virtue chart! (Note to authors: You give ONE of your characters a unique, but disgusting characteristic and it's good writing. Give it to more than one, and we start thinking we're reading your psychological profile, ya creep!)If you feel like pushing your brain to its max, read it. The man did win the Nobel after all, it's amazing. But get ready to work harder to understand something than you ever have before in your life. And may God be with you.FAVORITE QUOTES: (coincidentally also the shortest ones in the book)She had the rare virtue of never existing completely except at the opportune moment.He soon acquired the forlorn look that one sees in vegetarians.Children inherit their parents' madness.He really had been through death, but he had returned because he could not bear the solitude.The air was so damp that fish could have come in through the doors and swum out the windows.He was unable to bear in his soul the crushing weight of so much past.It's enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment.A person doesn't die when he should but when he can.

Eleanor

A book that covers the passage of time as if it were a wheel that would spin on into infinity were it not for the wear of the axle, One Hundred Years of Solitude is the story of the rise and fall of the Buendia family and their village Macondo. It tells the tender truths and lies of a family from the life of each member by blood and marriage, the passage of time told by the relationships of members who scarcely realize the depth to which their daily actions resonate back to generations before. Habits and quirks are passed on between family, noted only by the eldest family members, their every action and observation poetic. The fantastic elements never once distract from characters as flawed and real human beings, a boy followed by yellow butterflies, a girl so beautiful she transcends to heaven, the cryptic documents left by a gypsy older than the town itself who appears as a ghost to the Buendia family. Marquez depicts the realities of a family that is constantly reborn in the form of a solitary air, clairvoyant eyes, the craft of small toy animals, or a passion for making things to unmake them in such a way that is flowing, cyclical, and yet always unique. Admittedly there are boring generations/family members and that can make chunks of the book a little static but the ending is perfect. For minutes afterwards I felt like I died with the family.

E7san

كل الروايات تحكي حقبًا متفرقة من الزمن ، لكنّ مئة عام من العزلة تحكي الزمن ذاته !استطاع ماركيز أن يخترع عالمًا ، أن يبني كوكبا جديدا اسمه " ماكوندو " يوزع عليه شخصيات إنسانية متشابهة الأسماء ، تختلف عنا تمامًا ، تشبهنا تماما !من أين أبدئ ؟ حسنًا دعني أخبرك عن خط الزمن الذي خطه ماركيز ، لقد خلق ذاكرة في الكتاب ينقلها من يد شخصية إلى يد أخرى دون أن يعي القارئ بذلك !لقد كان خوزيه أركاديو بونديه هو أول من حمل هذه الذاكرة حتى لكأنك تعتقد بأنه بطل هذه الرواية ، ثم انتقلت بخفة إلى يد زوجته أورسولا ، ولربما كانا أطهر من في العائلة وأشدها طيبة وبراءة وإنسانية .ثم انتقلت الذاكرة - وحينها كانت ذاكرة ممتلئة كقربة مسافر - إلى يد العقيد أورنيول بونديه الابن الأصغر لأورسولا وخوزيه والذي أعتقد بأنه أكثر شخصية حصلت على تركيزي في الكتاب !وهكذا تنتقل الذاكرة من يد إلى أخرى حتى تصل إلى نهاية الملحمة لتبدئ بالتلاشي تدريجيًا ثم الاختفاء لتردد في نفسك : هل كنت أحلم أم أتخيل فيلمًا لم يصور بعد ؟والرواية على فوضوية أحداثها وتداخل أسماء أبطالها وغزارة أحداثها إلاّ أنّ حرفًا فيها لم يكن عبثًا ! حتى تلك الحوادث التي قد تبدو لك صدفًا أدبية حشا بها ماركيز الرواية .. أؤكد لك أنها لم تكن كذلك !والرواية بؤرة إنسانية عميقة ، إذا دخلتها وجدت كل صفات وأفعال الإنسان الجميلة جدا فيها والقبيحة جدا كذلك !ما الذي لم تحمله هذه الرواية للإنسان ؟السياسة والاقتصاد والحرب والحب والكراهية والعائلة والموت والأمومة والثقافة والعلوم والحكمة والشجع ... كل شيء كل شيءإنها رواية تستحق أن تعيشها لا أن تقرأها فحسب :)أكثر ما أثارني في الرواية كانت قصة موت أمارنتا !أن يأتي الموت إليك على شكل امرأة عجوز ثم يطلب منك البدء بخياطة كفنك وتطريزه لأنه سيزورك للمرة الأخيرة عندما تنتهي من فعل ذلكيالها من رمزية عجيبة .. بحق الله !كذلك تأثرت جدا بقصة العقيد أورليانو وتقلب قلبه الحر والصراع المحتدم الدائم بين ملائكته وشيطانه .عشت الغربة التي عاشتها روبيكا ، آلامها وشيخوختها وأمراضها القديمة .أحببتُ الجد الأول لهذه العائلة المجنونة خوزيه أركاديو بونديه ، أحببت موته اللطيف تحت شجرة الكستناء .كرهت أورليانو الثاني ، أشفقت على خوزيه أركاديو الثاني ، تقززت من أمارنتا أورسولا ، شعرت بالجنة التي أحاطت بروميديوس الجميلة :")إنه لمن المذهل كيف استطاع ماركيز اختصار مئة عام من العزلة في رواية واحدة ، عندما أفكر بهذا الآن أشعر بعبقريته وقدرته غير المحدودة .بقي أن أبدي تحفظي الشديد تجاه أخلاقيات الرواية ، فلم أقرأ في حياتي نصًا احتوى هذه الكمية من الدعارة والبؤس والقبح والقذارة .لكن قيمة الرواية الإنسانية إضافة إلى الأصل الجنوب أمريكي للكاتب - حيث الانحطاط الأخلاقي واقعا معاش - سمحت لي بتجاوز هذا الانحطاط ، ولأول مرة في حياتي أفعل ذلك ، أنا التي أمتلك حساسية أخلاقية شديدة للأعمال الأدبية .ومع ذلك فقد سرقت نجمة واحدة من نجمات التقييم بسبب هذه الأخلاقيات :)

Kenghis Khan

"The book picks up not too far after Genesis left off." And this fictitious chronicle of the Buendia household in the etherial town of Macondo somewhere in Latin America does just that. Rightly hailed as a masterpiece of the 20th century, Garcia Marquez's "One Hundred Years of Solitude" will remain on the reading list of every pretentious college kid, every under-employed author, every field-worker in Latin America, and indeed should be "required reading for the entire human race," as one reviewer put it a few decades back.No review, however laconic or ponderous, can do justice to this true piece of art. Perhaps I can only hint at a few of the striking features of the work that are so novel, so insightful, and which make it such a success in my opinion.By far and away the most inspiring element of the work is the author's tone. He reportedly self-conscioulsy wrote in the style that his grandmother back in Columbia used to tell him stories. Thus there is a conversational, meandering, but indeed succinct and perfect narrative voice to whisk the reader through the years of Macondo's fantastical history.Not unrelatedly, the tone has ample visual imagery, with superb attention to detail (and just the right quantity and nature of the detail that surrounds everyday life) to help prod the story along. The dolls of the child-bride treasured by the mother-in-law and heroine Ursula. The paranormal and mundane contrivences of the gypsies that are celebrated in the opening pages and which close the book. The tree to which the mad genius who founded the town and Buendia line is tied and dies in. The pretentious suitcases of the returning emigre. The goldfishes that are the relicts of a disillusioned but celebrated warrior. And the ubiquitous ants. All these objects have their proper place among the daily going abouts of the Buendia family, and serve to weave into the story a sense of BOTH the ordinary and the surreal.There is ample space in this world of Macondo and the Buendias for a sad commentary on that world South of the Rio Grande. Incessant, pointless civil wars. A rigid political and ecclesiastical hierarchy shoved down the throats of decent folk. The rampant exploitation of the tropics by outsiders, both foreign and domesitc. And perhaps most significantly, the strangely marginal and uncomfortable space occupied by technology in daily life in the Latino world. I am surely not alone in uncovering some facet of the work that speaks so boldly and loudly to me. This rich yet surprisingly elegant novel has, it seems, on every page the germinating seeds of an exciting conversation that speaks directly to an observation and experience everybody, and especially those coming to or from Latin America (or any underdeveloped nation), has had.And of course there are the brilliant characters, and the sense one gets of how they are affected by, and in turn affect, their setting. The story is aided by a pedigree one keeps referring to in the beginning of the book, as its immense scope (yes, 100 years) and maddening array of characters demand of the reader to conjure up visualizations of what exactly is going on. It is no wonder that this work is celebrated for being almost biblical in scope.Yes, my review can be condensed into three words: READ THIS BOOK!!!

mai ahmd

حين تفكر بقراءة هذه الرواية يجب أن تضع نصب عينيك أنك لا تقرأ عملا اعتياديا يستلزم جهدا مشابها عليك أن تترك كل حواسك مع الكتاب المترجم علماني كان متفهما جدا لطبيعة القارىء العربي وربما صعوبة التواصل مع أسماء بهذا الكم وأجيال بهذا العدد فما كان منه إلا أن وضع خارطة للأجيال الستة التي مروا على قرية ماكوندو من أسرة خوسيه أركاديو بوينديا تسهيلا وحتى لا يقع القارىء في لبس الأسماء وهذا يحسب لعلماني كمترجم له باع في الترجمة بلغة سلسة أصبح يتهافت عليها الجميع الرواية من الروايات العظيمة والتي تقدم دروسا في فن كتابة الرواية السحرية الخالدة أنها لا يمكن أن تكون سوى ملحمة هذه الرواية هي الرواية التي حصل ماركيز بعدها على نوبل وهي الرواية التي ظلت لسنوات عديدة من أكثر الكتب مبيعا في القارة اللاتينية كتب ماركيز قصة قرية أسرة بوينديا لأجيال عديدة منذ الجهد الذي بذل في بناء قرية ماكوندو وحتى آخر فرد في سلالتها تلك القرية التي اختير مكانها بعد صعوبات عدة القرية الهادئة التي تنعم بالسلام وحتى توافد الناس عليها وكل مراحل التطور التي مرت بها القرية كانت مرتبطة بألأسرة الآنفة الذكر لم يكن ماركيز مجرد كاتب يعتني بتفاصيل الحدث ولكن في كثير من الأحيان كنتُ أخاله مصور يصور الحالة وويهتم بالكادر ويرتب تكوين الصورة كأجمل ما تكون ثم يطلقها لكي تقع عليها العيون المتشبثة لكل حرف فيها كان من الطريف جدا والمأساوي أيضا ما ذكره ماركيز حول هذه الرواية أنه لم يكن يملك أجر البريد لإرسالها إلى الناشر يقول: «أرسلتُ مخطوطة «مائة عام من العزلة»، إلى فرانثيسكو بوروا في دار نشر سورامريكا في بوينس آيرس، وعند وزن الطرد طلب موظف البريد أن ندفع 72 بيسوس، ولم نملك غير 53 بيسوس، فقمنا بفصل المخطوط إلى قسمين متساويين، وأرسلنا قسماً منه، وبعد ذلك انتبهنا إلى أننا أرسلنا القسم الثاني من الرواية». وعلق ماركيز: «لحسن الحظ كان فرانثيسكو بوروا متلهفا لمعرفة القسم الأول من الرواية، فأعاد إلينا النقود، كي نرسل له القسم الأول».تخيلوا لو لم يكن هذا الناشر مطلعا ومتفهما لضيع علينا قراءة هذه الرواية الخارقة! لا أعرف ماذا أقول هنا الحقيقة ولكن هذه الرواية عالم خيالي لكنه ليس بعيد عن الواقع أنها واقعية جدا بكل شخوصها المجنونة وعثراتهم وتقلباتهم ماركيز يلجأ أحيانا إلى لعبة الخيال لكي يقضي على شخصية انتهى دورها مثل تلك التي طارت بجسدها وروحها إلى السماء أو لعلاج فكرة ما , كوجود الأطباء الغير مرئيين الذين كانت تتراسل معهم أورسولا وفريناندا , كما تذكرت وأنا أقرأ المشهد الأخير وظهور ذنب الخنزير المرتبط بالخطيئة بتلك القصة الكارتونية ماجد لعبة خشبية الذي كان حين يلجأ إلى الكذب يستطيل أنفه يذكر أن ماركيز من الكتاب الذين تتقاطع فيه روايتهم وهذا شأن الكثير من الكتاب الكبار فهناك باموق وساباتو وجدت تشابها في أحداث شركة الموز مع أحداث عاصفة الأوراق أول رواية كتبها ماركيز كذلك هناك روايات أخرى للأسف لم أطلع عليها ولكن هناك دائما رابط ما وصفت إحدى الصديقات هذه الرواية بأنها العالم وبعد قراءة الرواية قلت أيضا هذه الرواية هي العالم أنها أدق تشبيه ممكن أن يقال عن أحداثها عالم متشابك متناقض بسيط ومعقد سعادة وألم موت وحياة قصة المذبحة ومن قبلها حرب التصفية كلها إشارات سياسية واضحة كما كانت تلك الإشارات تومض عندما سأل أوريليانو صديقه عن سبب خوضه للحرب !غرقت معهم في الطوفان وفي اكتشافات أورسولا وتوقفت عند هذه العبارة حين وجدت ما فقدته فرناندا اكتشفت أن كل فرد في العائلة يكرر كل يوم دون وعي منه التنقلات نفسها والتصرفات نفسها بل ويكررون تقريبا الكلمات نفسها في الموعد نفسه وعندما يخرجون عن هذا الروتين الدقيق فقط يتعرضون للمجازفة بفقدان شيء ما !وهذا حقيقي جدا إننا نكرر ما نفعله كل يوم وعندما نخرج من روتيننا المعتاد نضيع !أما عن تشبيهات ماركيز فالحقيقة أنه لم تمر علي تشبيهات بهذاالجمال والدقة وحسن التعبير ورقة الإحساس حين يقول كان نحيلا وقورا حزينا كمسلم في أوربا أو كان يمضي مع التيار بلا حب أو طموح كنجم تائه في مجموعة أورسولا الشمسية هل قرأتم تشبيهات بهذا العمق !وما يثير ضحكي جدا هو مجموعة الأطباء الغير المرئيين لقد أبحر ماركيز في خيالاته السحرية في هذه الرواية إلى كل الإتجاهات تركني ألاحق خيالاته ياه كم سأفتقد أجواء هذه الرواية سأفتقد جرعات الجنون المركزة داء الأرق الطوفان شجرة الكستناء الأطباء الغير المرئيين السمكات الذهبية حفلات العربدة والولائم الصاخبة حتى النمل والعث لم أتمنى أن تنتهي تلك الأسرة ولا تلك النهاية ودار في رأسي كل خيالات ماركيز في القرية وكل أرويليانووكل خوسي أركاديو لقد رحلوا جميعا ويجب أن أعود إلى الواقع أخيرا !

Jacey

This was the first book I'd ever read where the end was as good as the beginning and middle, that's to say -- excellent. A circular story of a family through the generations, through the banana trees, through the political turmoil. Magical realism at it's best.If it helps, by the time you get half way through the book you shouldn't have to look at the family tree at the front of the book anymore.

Marmor Owais

حينما بدأت بقراءة تلك الملحمة ظننت أن المشكلة التى ستواجهنى هي صعوبة الأسماء الأسبانية ، لكننى لم أدرك أن الصعوبة ليست فى الأسماء لذاتهاولكنها فى تكرارها .. ما هذه العبقرية ! سلالة بالكامل تمدد مائة عام تحملاسمين فقط هما خوسيه أركاديو وأوريليانو .. تلك الرواية لا تستطيع أن تصف أحداثها -على الأقل أتحدث عن نفسى- لكنك تستطيع أن تصف إحساسك بها.هي بالتأكيد عبقريةومذهلة ومبهرة وغريبة فى نفس الوقت .. غريبة بأساطيرها السحرية كداء الأرق وذنب الخنزير دليل على الخطيئة وتجول الأموات.. واختلاط أوريليانو الثاني بخوسيه أركاديو الثاني فعاش كل منهم باسم الأخر، وياللسخرية عند موتهما اختلط التابوتان ودفن كل منهم فى قبر الآخر .. ! لا أستغرب إصابة ماركيز بالخرف فى أواخر حياته فهو بالتأكيد كان يهذى عندما كتب هذه الرواية. كيف استطاع الإتيان بتلك الحبكة الدرامية والعبقريةفى التعبير والإحساس ..يرسم بالكلمات واقع تلك القرية "ماكوندو" التى أنشأها خوسيه أركاديو بوينديا حتى دمرتها الرياح منهية تاريخ تلك السلالة.. "أول السلالة مربوط إلى شجرة وأخرهم يأكله النمل" ما هذه الجملة العبقرية التى تلخص الرواية والتى كتبها ميليكادس فى رقاقه التى تركها .. وكأن الرواية كتبت نهايتها قبل البداية. كنت أود لو لم تنتهى تلك العزلة التى قضيتها بين صفحات تلك الرواية.

Tim

I had a magical AP English teacher my senior year of high school, who had an ethereal, almost magical (sort of a whisper, sort of a song) voice and a flourish and passion for reading. She assigned us Garcia-Marquez' "100 Years Of Solitude," it was one of those (i'll admit and hope it doesn't sound lame or cheesy) life-changing moments.I can't say what it was at that moment that so moved me, but I attribute this as the book that made me love reading...love words. I hadn't come across any authors whose words could move deftly from the grounded, the sublime, and the real to the super-natural, the magic, and the surreal. The chapters almost blew off the pages like maple-wings from a tree (hey, I can visualize it)...and literally from that point on I learned how to look beyond what you can see in the everyday to peer into the beyond.This is the only novel that I have read multiple times, and I could pick it up again today and read it cover to cover.

Christina White

Torture. This book seemed like it would NEVER end. I didn't enjoy this book... and here are some reasons I came up with:1. I'm not Colombian2. Magical realism makes my head hurt3. Incest is disgusting4. Everyone had the same name and the characters kept dying... therefore I had no investment in the relationships and no sense of a plot that I cared to follow through to the end.Maybe I'm just not intellectual or smart enough to enjoy this book... There are so many reviews of praise. I totally missed the boat on this one.

Paul

Well Mr Marquez may have a Nobel Prize for his mantelpiece and a pretty good imagination for writing what with the levitating women and babies made of ice cream but he has no imagination at all when he is thinking of his characters names which are like to drive you entirely insane in this novel, will you please look at this. There are five people called Arcadio, ,three ladies called Remedios, two ladies called Amaranta and there’s a Pietro and a Petra which look quite similar, and there are 23 people called Aureliano (17 of them sons of an Aureliano, so this father has as much lack of name imagination as Mr Marquez). It does give a reader brain ache trying to remember who is who and why they are levitating and which one lives to be 530 years old. I think this is a very good novel for people who like to go into trances for hours at a time.

Share your thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *