Die Königin der Verdammten

ISBN: 3442098432
ISBN 13: 9783442098439
By: Anne Rice

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Genres

Anne Rice Currently Reading Fantasy Favorites Fiction Horror Paranormal To Read Vampire Vampires

About this book

Er ist schön wie ein gefallener Engel, doch sein Lebenselixier ist Blut: Lestat de Lioncourt, der ewige Rebell unter den Vampiren, der Jüngling mit den blauen Augen und dem blonden Haar. Seine unerhörten Taten haben die Liebe von Akascha, der Königin der Verdammten, geweckt. Sie, die Urmutter aller Vampire, bricht nach jahrtausendelangem Schlaf mit ihrem geliebten Prinzen Lestat auf, die Welt nach ihren eigenen archaisch-grausamen Vorstellungen zu gestalten. Bis Lestat erkennt, dass er sich zwischen seinem verzehrenden Verlangen nach Akascha und der Liebe zu den Menschen entscheiden muss.

Reader's Thoughts

Anna

To this day still my favorite Vampire fiction book. I may be biased as the Anne Rice Vampire Chronicles novels were my introduction the genre. But it has stood the test of time for me. First off this is a long book, but I still couldn't put it down, despite my usual dislike of novels over about 200-300 pages. It just covers so much ground in Vampire Mythos and I think it was well worth the length. Anne Rice's crowning achievement in my estimation, it really gave life to the vampire fiction genre that is all the craze today. First off Anne Rice's vampire's are the epitome of what makes a vampire a true vampire. She does not dumb down the raw nature of these creatures and really infuses her characters with such personality that you almost feel as if you know them. I think this is truly a delight for anyone that enjoys today's vampire mania but wants more. It definitely has that to offer.

Austin James

"The Queen of the Damned" is the third book in Anne Rice's vampire chronicles. Out of the three I read this was probably my least favorite. Don't get me wrong. It's not a bad book. It's just not as good as the previous two books.The story starts off where the last book (The Vampire Lestat) ends. I find Rice's books to be the best when they are narrated from the first person. Much of this book isn't done in first person. The story jumps around from character to character. Also, the core of the story isn't really about Lestat (A character I, like many others like very much). It's about Akasha (The Queen of the Damned) and two witches who lived in Egypt long ago. Never the less, it's still and interesting story and it was an enjoyable read. The next Anne Rice book I'm going to read is "The Mummy or Ramses the Dead."I would give this book three out of five stars.Originally reviewed on my blog at http://www.AustinJamesHere.blogspot.com

Stefan Yates

When I started this book, I really had problems getting into it. I think that the problem for me was that it skipped around quite a bit between characters in the beginning and tried to introduce several new ones only to kill off some of them immediatly. In essence, I guess it took me out of my comfort zone and I wasn't too sure that I liked it.But, perseverance paid off and after 150 pages or so, I found myself drawn deeply into this robust story. The book is well written, taking us between current events happening with our vampire friends and deeper into the vampire mythology than we have ever been. Most of this novel focuses on the creation of the vampire race and it certainly does not disappoint. Ms. Rice has created a rich, lush background for her version of the vampire species and by linking them to current events happening to her characters, she makes the history itself come alive...literally!

Nicola

I like books. I like reading them, writing them, sleeping with every word I have ever read staring down at me in a legacy of comforting language. I have only ever in my life put down two books without finishing them, and throughout this whole torturous affair I had to continuously remind myself that I don't want that figure to reach three. In short, this was slow, painful and pointless, more of an elongated love affair with Rice's beloved Lestat than any honest attempt to, y'now, educate or entertain her audience. I wish I hadn't started it, because then I could have read something else.Plot? There is effectively none. The whole thing is told through a series of side-stories and flashbacks, with the actual conflict resolved in a handful of pages at the back end of the book, about two or three hundred after I started actually, verbally yelling at the thing to get to the point already. Nothing at all is accomplished; Rice cleans up her mythology a little bit and injects a bit more vampiric superpowers into her fictional crush Lestat. This, more than anything, is what grates about the story. Every character spends far too much time worrying over Lestat. It is an elongated aggrandizing, a chance to reiterate just how attractive, devilish, powerful and irresistible the irritating little godlet is. Every other character spends far, far too much time worrying over him, and each mewling phrase sticks out of the narrative like a staple in a quiche. Even the titled Queen of the Damned herself, who at points showed the potential to be a well-realized character with a handful of villainous virtues and flaws, is inevitably defeated because Lestat is just too damned beautiful for anyone to resist. It's tiresome, it's awful, and it makes me angry - because there ARE hints, here and there, of surprising narrative potential, if only when the author pulls her head out of her own ass long enough to write a chapter that has absolutely nothing to do with her favorite dead, white masturbation fodder.Skip it; watch the movie if you must, it's shorter.

Wendie Collins

This is my favorite Anne Rice book! Akasha, the goddess- my goddess! :) How can you not love a vampire queen gone mad and taken to killing all the men in the world??... ah yes save for one the brat prince! Sounds like a great plan to me! That was left out of the movie! Among many many other things! Speaking of the movie, although I thought it was a pretty good vampire flick and Aaliyah is perfect for Akasha, besides the names, there wasn't much resemblance to the book. I was disappointed with how far it fell from from the story line. Anne Rice truly captivates me in this tale however and this book is gripping. How she describes Akasha & Enkil and ties their existence to the Egyptian legends of Isis and Osiris is awesome! She explains a story of creation for her vampires that is incomparable! It is truly captivating, and believable! This book is a MUST read for all Lestat and/or Anne Rice fans.

Matthew Leeth

** spoiler alert ** I really liked this book and all the interwoven stories and characters. I actually liked Akasha until she kept blabbing on and on about her 'plan' of killing all the men of the world. I can see why they killed her... She should have just went along with them, maybe she would have lived longer. I liked Jesse a lot, her character was really interesting. The Claudia cameo was awesome, and the diary excerpt was cool. Kind of made me want Anne to write a full length Claudia diary. This book was a really good addition to the series. I wished Lestat's musical career would have lasted longer. Louis and Gabrielle being in this book was good also, I never get tired of those characters. They rank up there for me. I also liked Maharet and her twin sister was pretty bad-ass. All she had to do was push Akasha into a glass wall to kill her, the glass chopped her head off. Then... they ate her brain and heart to keep the vampires alive. GOOD GOOD book. I could write a whole lot more, but yeah.READ THIS BOOK!!!

Sophie Elizabeth

** spoiler alert ** (I warn you, this review contains spoilers, though it doesn't really ruin the storyline, I don't think!)The introduction to this book is, as in all the other books with Lestat as a narrator, fantastic. I love the way he always introduces himself, the vain bastard that he is. And of course (because I'm a sad little girl with no life who develops attractions for literary creatures) I hang on each line, wondering "Oh, what did you do THIS TIME?!" To be very honest, when I started the book, I wasn't entirely enamored with it. The multiple view-point aspect of if confused me just a little (perhaps because for months and months before I had been reading countless first-person narratives). Although, from the moment that Jesse walks into the story I was drawn in, hook, line and sinker. Maybe it was the idea of this mysterious Maharet lady, or perhaps it was the idea of a supernatural investigations group (any "X-Files" fan would fall for the idea of the Talamasca, surely)that fetched me and I was utterly involved with the story. I was INSIDE the novel. You couldn't get me out. I read it from breakfast until dinner time one Saturday when I had leave to get away with it.Jesse seems to be key in a lot of my favourite scenes in this book - we get this fantastic piece of insight into the mind of Claudia when Jesse finds her diary (the diary calls out for another novel entirely - only Claudia would have told the truth about what actually happened between those two bitter men who like to spite each other in their respective autobiographies). Claudia loved Lestat as much as she hated him, and I think that her love for him was a little bit more desire-based than her love for Louis which was need-based... Anyway, the fact that she wanted him in a very non-childish way is perhaps a good reason for her to hate him... Jesse is also the key character in my very favourite scene in all of fiction - (save perhaps the "Midsummer's Day" passages of "I Capture The Castle" by Dodie Smith) - the scene where the Brat Prince is onstage, a 1980's rock star to put Jon Bon Jovi and Axl Rose to shame, and she jumps up to him. I swear, no character in any novel has ever come across sexier than the vampire rockstar. It's a superficial enough reason to love that passage of a book, but what can I say, I love fiction, I love music! (The song I have soundtracked for that scene is "March Of The Black Queen" by the band Queen - it sounds exactly like the band The Vampire Lestat sounds in my head... Just by-the-by).Anyway, after the concert scene the story takes on a whirlwind life of its own. Several plotlines string together seamlessly - which makes this novel perhaps one of the deftest pieces of complex storytelling that I have ever read. Suddenly Armand, Daniel, Marius, Louis, Gabrielle, Mael, Khaymen, Eric, Santino, Maharet and Jesse are all in a room together. The sheer idea of it amused me - it was like the Teddy Bears' Picnic for vampires. Meanwhile Lestat is whisked away on a killing spree with an ancient and evil vampire!In alternate pieces we are given what basically translates as to being the Book Of Genesis for vampires and the tale of a stupid blond idiot who runs away with a strange woman and finds that she's not quite what she seems. We also get to meet my favourite female character in all of the Chronicles: Maharet. A vampire who was made after she had a child. A vampire who has spent her eternity watching over each of her direct descendants. I'm from rural Ireland and I always make the analogy that "If she wasn't a blood-drinker, Maharet would invite you in for a cup of tea!" She's truly a wonderful character - perhaps the only character that Rice has ever created that was truly kind and without a malevolent streak.The history of the vampires, set in ancient Egypt is truly compelling - but then again, ever since childhood, I've loved the idea of Ancient Egypt. Akasha is an interesting character, though she bears some similarities with our fateful storyteller: Lestat. She is essentially his personality except of a different time: bratty, with an idea that she is entitled to all that she desires. Although, he is not a megalomaniac.Eventually the two storylines collide containing one of my favourite quotes of late (said by Lestat as he looks upon all the vampires who are gathered together): "Finally, those you love are simply... Those you love." It kind of describes my own mismatched family.And the ending is hilarious. Marius makes up the "new rules" and promptly Lestat decides to go out and break them, tossing his hair and asking Louis to tell him that he's bad, just because he loves to hear it. Classic!

Debra

After listening to The Vampire Lestat, which I enjoyed well enough, I couldn't very well stop there. I needed to know what happened to Lestat after his concert. So of course I picked up Queen of the Damned immediately after finishing that one.My god, there were a lot of characters in this novel. Thank god for a good narrator of this audiobook (the wonderful Simon Vance). He helped keep up with all the various characters with an impressive array of voices. The story itself was interesting, in that while it told Lestat's story (intertwined amongst a number of others), the vast majority of this particular novel was told from a variety of others' points of view, which helped keep it interesting. [image error]I enjoyed this novel, but I'm not sure I'll delve into the rest of the Vampire Chronicles for a while yet. Perhaps if Random House Audio continues to put out new recordings narrated by Simon Vance, I might be convinced. I'm not sure I could muster the attention span to sit and read them, though.

Fangs for the Fantasy

Lestat has rocked the vampire world with his music and his book revelations. But his voice has reached far more than he imagined – it has come to the ears of Akasha, the first vampire, the Queen of the Damned. For the first time in millennia, she has woken upAnd she has plans – plans for Lestat, plans for the world of vampires and plans for all humanity.It falls for a few ancient vampires to try and stop her as she unleashes carnage to realise her vision of what the world should be.This book is 460 pages long. And like every Anne Rice books I’ve read to date it could easily be half that or less. I cannot even begin to describe the amount of redundancy and repetition there is in this book.Usually when we get a character, the author will describe a bit about them, give some insight into their background and let the rest develop as the story progresses. Not Anne Rice. In these books we get a character and before they do anything even slightly relevant we have to have their life history. Not just their life history, but if we’re really lucky, we get their ancestry back 3 generations (at least) as well. It’s boring, it’s dull, it’s utterly irrelevant to anything resembling the plot.I can’t even say there’s much in the way of coherent plot here anyway. A large part of the book involves recapping the last book. We have the dreams of the twins that just serve to be ominous foreshadowing – but are repeated and repeated and repeated and repeated over and over. I really can’t stress how repetitive this book is – this same dream is recounted not just from multiple sources but then multiple times from each source. And this is a theme throughout the books, we have multiple sources all thinking about Lestat and his music – but all thinking exactly the same thing about Lestat and his music. So we get the same thing over and overAnd when people finally gather together their grand plan is EPIC EXPOSITION. Seriously, people being slaughtered, Askasha raging away and the gang gathers to have 2 solid nights of storytelling. The most long winded, repetitive story telling imaginable. Face the enemy with long winded folktales!Then there’s the characters – all of who’s point of view we are treated to in ridiculous length – most of which are utterly irrelevant. At least Louis and Gabrielle and Armand have some history in the story and we don’t see too much from their POV, they’re recognised as being spectators. But the rest? What exactly was the point of Khayman? He just kind of sat in a corner and was ineffably sad. But we got pages and pages from his POV. Jesse? What did Jesse actually do? What was the point of her? What was the relevance of her Great Family? But she was there, her POV, her chapters worth of backstory was dragged up, we roped in the Talamasca for more pages of pointlessness – because none of it was relevant. None of it added to the overall plot. None of it added to the ending. None of her history or story was really relevant. And Daniel – another character inserted with a painfully long backstory and history with Armand who, like Louis and Gabrielle and Armand and Jesse, ended up being nothing more than a spectator for the – and I use the term loosely – action. These characters are not part of the story, they’re spectators, it’s like stopping a play in the middle so we can hear the biography of Mrs. Jones in the 3rd row of the theatre. It doesn’t matter, I have no reason to care, it’s pure paddingRead More

Francisco

Tercera parte de las Crónicas Vampíricas. Agotada totalmente la creatividad, se suman vampiros y vísceras hasta llenar un montón de páginas innecesarias. Superflua.

Johnny Thief

This is the only book I've ever thrown against a wall. Repeatedly.Within the first five minutes Rice tells us about LeStat becoming a MTV rock star in language like your grandma talking about Elvis' pelvis. Really, TV rock star vampire? BAM! A week later, I pick it up while cleaning, & give it a second chance. Bam! Third chance. Bam! The last time, the thing that did it for me, is the first & most powerful vampire, so powerful she's practically marble & never feeds, never moves for anything that's happened in a millennia, rising from a 1000 year slumber because she watched MTV. BAM! And there it stayed, until I moved from that house. I think Rice channeled her own personal pain into a decent first novel, & then after that, had nothing to bring to the table. Of course now we have god damned sparkly vampires who carry your books. Do I get angry at the authors, or the vapid idiots who read it?

Delicious Strawberry

Ordinarily, for a book I enjoyed so much, I would give it five stars. The Legend of the Twins was actually my favorite story arc in Queen of the Damned, and the Twins are two of my favorite characters. Infact, I'd say that this book is my favorite in the entire Vampire Chronicles.But the reason I take away a star is due to the abrupt ending. It is clear that Akasha is deluded in her thinking, and that what she believes is good for mankind is not. But I wonder after 6000 years of sleep, she would have the wisdom to see a better path, unless these 6000 years spent in silence (except for exceedingly rare occasions) served to warp and twist her mind. This in itself is an entirely believable character.However, the very ending left me flat. I had to read the last chapter several times to make sure that I hadn't missed anything. I wish that Ms. Rice had put more of Mekare in future books, perhaps learning about modern society and getting used to her new role as Queen. The ending was far too abrupt and not well-thought out for a tale that was incredible.

Nicola O.

I kept waiting for it to get interesting but it never did. It got stupider and stupider until I thought my brains were leaking out. If I were on a desert island with nothing to read but this book, I would scratch out old 80's pop lyrics with a twig in the sand before trying to read this dreck again.

Daniel McGill

Much better then "Interview With the Vampire" This combined with "The Vampire Lestat" forms the best part of the Vampire Chronicles series and details the core mythos of Anne Rice’s vampires. In this book unlike the others in this series there are several narrators all with very interesting view points who each tell their own part of the story until the plot lines converge. If you intend to read any of Anne Rice’s Vampire novels (except possibly "Interview") make sure you read these first and are not trying to figure things out based on what you read in "Interview", Louis knows so little and his perspective is so skewed that he doesn't provide a very good introduction to this world. At least that's the literary version, in truth I suppose that Anne Rice hadn't made all of the world building decisions she needed to make yet and changed her mind on several points as well when she decided to take the vampires concept and run with it.

James

After chugging my way through Interview with a Vampire and Vampire Lestat, I finally completed The Queen of the Damned, an interesting if somewhat bloated work by Anne Rice. Anne’s written plenty of books in her vampire chronicles but I think I’ll stop here and savor it. The Children of the Darkness have their “Baltimore Catechism” (as Anne says) in The Queen of the Damned. The book does a pretty good job of catching up the new reader, but it’s better to read Lestat first. As in Lestat, the books actually appear as characters in this very story. The characters are somewhat fleshed out such as Daniel , the original writer of “Interview” who wants to be a vampire himself, following Armand all over until Mr. A acquiesces.Other characters are introduced too such as Jesse, a redhead and apparent relation to the original Twins who dealt with the Queen way back 5000 B.C.The book tends to really be slow at the start: lots of explanation, what is happening to Louis, New Orleans, the mysterious organization Talamasca, and other supernatural craziness that was at times hard to follow.Queen: Finally things start rolling mid-novel when all the characters we’ve met gather in a cabin in Sonoma and plot what they will do about the Queen, who really just wants to kill pretty much the entire male side of the human race (since men are so evil, doncha know!). I found Anne’s prose in this respect very interesting. Lestat seemed at times out of character, acquiescing to his Queen and at times even joining in the carnage rather than protest against her. That was a disappointment.The ending, I will not reveal, but I felt the final confrontation was quick and disappointing after all the build-up. The final paragraphs were fun: Lestat with his new-found power is delighting in it, and Rice sets us up for the next book. Bottom Line: Entertaining in the end, but you need the patience of an Exorcist to get through to that point! Best character: Jesse, although she was pretty much dropped from the story early on. Worse would have to be Mael, who didn’t really have much of a role to play in the final act. Recommended.

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