Die Königin der Verdammten

ISBN: 3442098432
ISBN 13: 9783442098439
By: Anne Rice

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Anne Rice Currently Reading Fantasy Favorites Fiction Horror Paranormal To Read Vampire Vampires

About this book

Er ist schön wie ein gefallener Engel, doch sein Lebenselixier ist Blut: Lestat de Lioncourt, der ewige Rebell unter den Vampiren, der Jüngling mit den blauen Augen und dem blonden Haar. Seine unerhörten Taten haben die Liebe von Akascha, der Königin der Verdammten, geweckt. Sie, die Urmutter aller Vampire, bricht nach jahrtausendelangem Schlaf mit ihrem geliebten Prinzen Lestat auf, die Welt nach ihren eigenen archaisch-grausamen Vorstellungen zu gestalten. Bis Lestat erkennt, dass er sich zwischen seinem verzehrenden Verlangen nach Akascha und der Liebe zu den Menschen entscheiden muss.

Reader's Thoughts

Johnny Thief

This is the only book I've ever thrown against a wall. Repeatedly.Within the first five minutes Rice tells us about LeStat becoming a MTV rock star in language like your grandma talking about Elvis' pelvis. Really, TV rock star vampire? BAM! A week later, I pick it up while cleaning, & give it a second chance. Bam! Third chance. Bam! The last time, the thing that did it for me, is the first & most powerful vampire, so powerful she's practically marble & never feeds, never moves for anything that's happened in a millennia, rising from a 1000 year slumber because she watched MTV. BAM! And there it stayed, until I moved from that house. I think Rice channeled her own personal pain into a decent first novel, & then after that, had nothing to bring to the table. Of course now we have god damned sparkly vampires who carry your books. Do I get angry at the authors, or the vapid idiots who read it?

Danielle Tremblay

The third installment of the Vampire Chronicles starts off just about where the last left us. Lestat is preparing for his big moment, the first concert of his band The Vampire Lestat. It is at this concert that all Vampire hell is going to break loose as Lestat has awakened the oldest of them all...the Queen of the Damned.Anne Rice again provides us readers with lavish descriptions and immense action. The one problem I have with this novel is the amount of characters she has all wrapped up in this one text. It starts off from the point of Lestat, but soon you find yourself in the world from the point of view of at least seven other characters. This is one time where Rice seems to have taken on a bit more than she can handle. Because of the fact that there are indeed so many characters, one can get lost and find themselves not even caring what really happens to them. The only saving grace is that they do all link up somehow in the end.The only other complaint I have is the fact that, after all the years (6000 to be exact) that the Queen was dormant, the plan she comes up with is pretty weak. In a sense, its almost downright unbelievable (something most of Rice's characters are not).Overall this is a good novel and is well worth reading; especially if you're already into The Vampire Chronicles. It may seem rushed at times, as well as there being to much information for you to try and take in, but stay with it because it all comes together in the end.

Heather

I liked it well enough. There was a lot of skipping around. There was a lot of poetry in the beginnings of chapters written by "Stan Rice" who I assume is Anne's husband? I just skipped over all of that.There was a lot in the book that I thought was superfluous. Such as the story of Baby Jenks. It was merely an obstacle in my path to finding out about Akasha and the truth to the beginnings of all of Anne Rice's vampires. I liked the stories that involved Jesse and I liked the stories that involved Khayman. Khayman's story actually made me laugh as he sought to entertain himself by dressing up in the stereotypical outfits and such. The best part of the whole book was The Legend of the Twins. Anne Rice provoked my interest with the dreams. At first I had no idea what they meant, but I knew they had to be about the beginning. She teased me with these dreams being shared by all of the vampires whose stories we read in Queen of the Damned. And finally she gave them to me. But she gave them to me in parts. She interrupted the story of the Twins with Lestat and Akasha's adventures which were boring. Although I quite like how Akasha thinks. I like her grand design for the future and the reason she awoke. I was sad to see about her end, but I knew it was coming. Overall it was enjoyable. I put it down several times and picked it back up within only a matter of days. It was by no means as good as the previous two books -- Interview with the Vampire and The Vampire Lestat... but it did give us more insight into the character of Lestat which was a driving force for me. I quite like the character of Lestat. Do I recommend the book? If you like the series, if you liked the characters from the previous books... yes. It is an integral piece of the story and is an insight further into the minds of each of the vampires of Anne Rice's world. It is the story of how all vampires from this universe came to be and is therefore an important read if you loved this universe. But be aware that it has some serious downtime.

James

After chugging my way through Interview with a Vampire and Vampire Lestat, I finally completed The Queen of the Damned, an interesting if somewhat bloated work by Anne Rice. Anne’s written plenty of books in her vampire chronicles but I think I’ll stop here and savor it. The Children of the Darkness have their “Baltimore Catechism” (as Anne says) in The Queen of the Damned. The book does a pretty good job of catching up the new reader, but it’s better to read Lestat first. As in Lestat, the books actually appear as characters in this very story. The characters are somewhat fleshed out such as Daniel , the original writer of “Interview” who wants to be a vampire himself, following Armand all over until Mr. A acquiesces.Other characters are introduced too such as Jesse, a redhead and apparent relation to the original Twins who dealt with the Queen way back 5000 B.C.The book tends to really be slow at the start: lots of explanation, what is happening to Louis, New Orleans, the mysterious organization Talamasca, and other supernatural craziness that was at times hard to follow.Queen: Finally things start rolling mid-novel when all the characters we’ve met gather in a cabin in Sonoma and plot what they will do about the Queen, who really just wants to kill pretty much the entire male side of the human race (since men are so evil, doncha know!). I found Anne’s prose in this respect very interesting. Lestat seemed at times out of character, acquiescing to his Queen and at times even joining in the carnage rather than protest against her. That was a disappointment.The ending, I will not reveal, but I felt the final confrontation was quick and disappointing after all the build-up. The final paragraphs were fun: Lestat with his new-found power is delighting in it, and Rice sets us up for the next book. Bottom Line: Entertaining in the end, but you need the patience of an Exorcist to get through to that point! Best character: Jesse, although she was pretty much dropped from the story early on. Worse would have to be Mael, who didn’t really have much of a role to play in the final act. Recommended.

Delicious Strawberry

Ordinarily, for a book I enjoyed so much, I would give it five stars. The Legend of the Twins was actually my favorite story arc in Queen of the Damned, and the Twins are two of my favorite characters. Infact, I'd say that this book is my favorite in the entire Vampire Chronicles.But the reason I take away a star is due to the abrupt ending. It is clear that Akasha is deluded in her thinking, and that what she believes is good for mankind is not. But I wonder after 6000 years of sleep, she would have the wisdom to see a better path, unless these 6000 years spent in silence (except for exceedingly rare occasions) served to warp and twist her mind. This in itself is an entirely believable character.However, the very ending left me flat. I had to read the last chapter several times to make sure that I hadn't missed anything. I wish that Ms. Rice had put more of Mekare in future books, perhaps learning about modern society and getting used to her new role as Queen. The ending was far too abrupt and not well-thought out for a tale that was incredible.

Debra

After listening to The Vampire Lestat, which I enjoyed well enough, I couldn't very well stop there. I needed to know what happened to Lestat after his concert. So of course I picked up Queen of the Damned immediately after finishing that one.My god, there were a lot of characters in this novel. Thank god for a good narrator of this audiobook (the wonderful Simon Vance). He helped keep up with all the various characters with an impressive array of voices. The story itself was interesting, in that while it told Lestat's story (intertwined amongst a number of others), the vast majority of this particular novel was told from a variety of others' points of view, which helped keep it interesting. [image error]I enjoyed this novel, but I'm not sure I'll delve into the rest of the Vampire Chronicles for a while yet. Perhaps if Random House Audio continues to put out new recordings narrated by Simon Vance, I might be convinced. I'm not sure I could muster the attention span to sit and read them, though.

CHris.T.o.S

a book of miracles....unimaginably good...NO VAMPIRES HAVE WALKED THE EARTH OF IMAGINATION AS HERS....they re so glamorous the could be gods...I am happy cause i finally found out how Kerrigan and Akasha in DOTA were created...And i get it i do realize why the movie was so diabolically bad,it takes guts to write the things she wrote in that book, i mean when u speak about Akasha,Armand,Maharet or Marius there is a tragic higher sense to it WHO WOULD TAKE THE RISK TO FILM IT!?Anne is a very influential writer and has a very distinct way to write and up to this point i am such a fun... A MUST HAVE BOOK!

Ally

This is the first Anne Rice I ever read and I was in love. As a 16 year old who hated to read this book changed all of that. Her attention to detail and exquisite talent in building a whole other world, made me feel like I was in the world of the vampires. she created a history of vampires which I have never seen before, the side stories were just as amazing as the tale of the main Vampires. Now don't get me wrong this is not the first book I ever read, it was just the first book I ever wanted to finish and truly loved. I read it three times that summer, until college and life set in and I let a friend borrow it and never got it back. :( so then I decided to read some more Anne Rice, thanks to the history of the old ones it made all her vampire books more enjoyable. Rice's attention to detail makes you believe there really could be vampires out there, she and this book are that good.

Shelbielou

In this book you go on an adventure with the vampire Lestat, while he is lost in finding the meaning of immortality. He wakes from a 200 year sleep to find the world he knew so much more develop from what it was. He finds a liking to rock music and from it creates the biggest rock band in history. in the music he is open about being a vampire, this goes against all codes from being a vampire and angers all others. This created a whole new meaning of Lestats life, and opens doors for the amazing history of it.The Author used such great detail in this book. The pages are still vivid in my mind. Every thing that you ever wanted to know about the orgin of vampires Anne Rice gives it and much more.This books was fantastic but some of the details Dawdled and a few places it seemed as if the book would never end, I felt as if the author was ranting a bit, it was a bit tedious to get through.If you enjoyed this book I highly recommend all the the Vampire Chronicles, the story that go with each are simply amazing. But do not watch the movie Queen of the damned, The movie ruins the book by far and has little connection to anything.

Fangs for the Fantasy

Lestat has rocked the vampire world with his music and his book revelations. But his voice has reached far more than he imagined – it has come to the ears of Akasha, the first vampire, the Queen of the Damned. For the first time in millennia, she has woken upAnd she has plans – plans for Lestat, plans for the world of vampires and plans for all humanity.It falls for a few ancient vampires to try and stop her as she unleashes carnage to realise her vision of what the world should be.This book is 460 pages long. And like every Anne Rice books I’ve read to date it could easily be half that or less. I cannot even begin to describe the amount of redundancy and repetition there is in this book.Usually when we get a character, the author will describe a bit about them, give some insight into their background and let the rest develop as the story progresses. Not Anne Rice. In these books we get a character and before they do anything even slightly relevant we have to have their life history. Not just their life history, but if we’re really lucky, we get their ancestry back 3 generations (at least) as well. It’s boring, it’s dull, it’s utterly irrelevant to anything resembling the plot.I can’t even say there’s much in the way of coherent plot here anyway. A large part of the book involves recapping the last book. We have the dreams of the twins that just serve to be ominous foreshadowing – but are repeated and repeated and repeated and repeated over and over. I really can’t stress how repetitive this book is – this same dream is recounted not just from multiple sources but then multiple times from each source. And this is a theme throughout the books, we have multiple sources all thinking about Lestat and his music – but all thinking exactly the same thing about Lestat and his music. So we get the same thing over and overAnd when people finally gather together their grand plan is EPIC EXPOSITION. Seriously, people being slaughtered, Askasha raging away and the gang gathers to have 2 solid nights of storytelling. The most long winded, repetitive story telling imaginable. Face the enemy with long winded folktales!Then there’s the characters – all of who’s point of view we are treated to in ridiculous length – most of which are utterly irrelevant. At least Louis and Gabrielle and Armand have some history in the story and we don’t see too much from their POV, they’re recognised as being spectators. But the rest? What exactly was the point of Khayman? He just kind of sat in a corner and was ineffably sad. But we got pages and pages from his POV. Jesse? What did Jesse actually do? What was the point of her? What was the relevance of her Great Family? But she was there, her POV, her chapters worth of backstory was dragged up, we roped in the Talamasca for more pages of pointlessness – because none of it was relevant. None of it added to the overall plot. None of it added to the ending. None of her history or story was really relevant. And Daniel – another character inserted with a painfully long backstory and history with Armand who, like Louis and Gabrielle and Armand and Jesse, ended up being nothing more than a spectator for the – and I use the term loosely – action. These characters are not part of the story, they’re spectators, it’s like stopping a play in the middle so we can hear the biography of Mrs. Jones in the 3rd row of the theatre. It doesn’t matter, I have no reason to care, it’s pure paddingRead More

Anna

To this day still my favorite Vampire fiction book. I may be biased as the Anne Rice Vampire Chronicles novels were my introduction the genre. But it has stood the test of time for me. First off this is a long book, but I still couldn't put it down, despite my usual dislike of novels over about 200-300 pages. It just covers so much ground in Vampire Mythos and I think it was well worth the length. Anne Rice's crowning achievement in my estimation, it really gave life to the vampire fiction genre that is all the craze today. First off Anne Rice's vampire's are the epitome of what makes a vampire a true vampire. She does not dumb down the raw nature of these creatures and really infuses her characters with such personality that you almost feel as if you know them. I think this is truly a delight for anyone that enjoys today's vampire mania but wants more. It definitely has that to offer.

dragonhelmuk

** spoiler alert ** Kindled for £4.67. Amazing book. The age, the minds and the personalities of all of the characters are among the best thought out I've ever read of. And there is definitely something compelling and likeable, even fascinating about each of them. Sadly though, there are some problems the vampires frequently get completely distracted, and even faint from the power of their own thoughts all the time, and they are all as queasy and fashion conscious as Victorians. Also either Anne Rice's own logic is childish, or all her characters are as easily bedazzled by pretty arguments and sparkly things as Greeks. Witness their complete acceptance of the misandric queen's argument that, essentially, the world would be a better place with no men. Two quotes...(Meeting of the undead)“How many?” … Armand again had the lost expression, the expression that belonged to deep concentration, as if what he saw before him meant nothing at all. “Thirty perhaps,” he whispered in Daniel’s ear, “no more than that, and one or two so old they could destroy the rest of us in an instant.”…The name had done it, as names so often do. The creature had felt himself known, recognized. And Khayman had recognized the name at once, connecting it with the Mael of Lestat’s pages. Undoubtedly they were one and the same—this was the Druid priest who had lured Marius into the sacred grove where the blood god had made him one of its own, and sent him off to Egypt to find the Mother and the Father. Yes, this was the same Mael. And the creature felt himself recognized and hated it. After the initial spasm of rage, all thought and emotion vanished. A rather dizzying display of strength, Khayman conceded. He relaxed in the chair. But the creature couldn’t find him. Two dozen other white faces he picked out of the crowd, but not Khayman.…Khayman spied another intriguing figure, much younger, yet almost as powerful in his own fashion as the Gaul, Mael. Khayman sought for the name, but the creature’s mind was a perfect blank; not so much as a glimmer of personality escaped from it. A boy he’d been when he died, with straight dark auburn hair, and eyes a little too big for his face. But it was easy, suddenly to filch the being’s name from his newborn fledgling who stood beside him. Armand… And this meant the he was no more than five hundred years old, yet he veiled himself completely. Shrewd, cold he seemed, yet without flair—a stance that required no room in which to display itself. And now, sensing infallibly that he was watched, he turned his large soft brown eyes upward and fixed instantly upon the remote figure of Khayman.(About the Talamasca)“Talamasca.” The word struck Daniel suddenly as beautiful. Talamasca. He broke it down from the Latin, understood its parts. Somewhere out of his memory bank it came: animal mask. Old word for witch or shaman.…there were museums beneath the building, rooms crammed with mysterious objects connected with paranormal occurrences. There were vaults to which no one was admitted except the senior members of the order. Delicious, the prospect of secrets revealed only over a period of time.…the dignified furnishings, the stone fireplaces, the gleaming oak floors. Even the quiet civil members of the order appealed to her, as they greeted her cheerfully, then returned to their discussions or the reading of the evening papers, as they sat about the vast, warmly lighted public rooms. The sheer wealth of the place was startling. It lent substance to Lightner’s claims. And the place felt good. Psychically good. People here were what they said they were.…Then the history of the Talamasca itself proved powerfully attractive. Was this man telling the truth? A secret order, which traced its existence back to the year 758, an order with records of witches, sorcerers, mediums, and seers of spirits going back to that remote period?…“That painting of yours, The Temptation of Amadeo, the one in the Talamasca crypt...” “Yes?” “Wouldn’t you like to have it back?” “Ye gods, no. It’s a dreary thing, really. My black period, you might say. But I do wish they’d take it out of the damned cellar. You know, hang it in the front hall? Some decent place.” I laughed. Suddenly he became serious. Suspicious. “Lestat!” he said sharply. “Yes, Marius.” “You leave the Talamasca alone!”(Sadly none of Anne Rice’s characters are yet old or wise enough to argue against her own biases.)“What if the women divide along principles of masculine/feminine, the way men so often divide if there are no females there?” “You know that’s a foolish objection. Such distinctions are never more than superficial. Women are women! Can you conceive of war made by women? Truly, answer me. Can you? Can you conceive of bands of roving women intent only on destruction? Or rape? Such a thing is preposterous. For the aberrant few justice will be immediate. But overall, something utterly unforeseen will take place. Don’t you see? The possibility of peace on earth has always existed, and there have always been people who could realize it, and preserve it, and those people are women. If one takes away the men.”

Matthew Leeth

** spoiler alert ** I really liked this book and all the interwoven stories and characters. I actually liked Akasha until she kept blabbing on and on about her 'plan' of killing all the men of the world. I can see why they killed her... She should have just went along with them, maybe she would have lived longer. I liked Jesse a lot, her character was really interesting. The Claudia cameo was awesome, and the diary excerpt was cool. Kind of made me want Anne to write a full length Claudia diary. This book was a really good addition to the series. I wished Lestat's musical career would have lasted longer. Louis and Gabrielle being in this book was good also, I never get tired of those characters. They rank up there for me. I also liked Maharet and her twin sister was pretty bad-ass. All she had to do was push Akasha into a glass wall to kill her, the glass chopped her head off. Then... they ate her brain and heart to keep the vampires alive. GOOD GOOD book. I could write a whole lot more, but yeah.READ THIS BOOK!!!

Nicola

I like books. I like reading them, writing them, sleeping with every word I have ever read staring down at me in a legacy of comforting language. I have only ever in my life put down two books without finishing them, and throughout this whole torturous affair I had to continuously remind myself that I don't want that figure to reach three. In short, this was slow, painful and pointless, more of an elongated love affair with Rice's beloved Lestat than any honest attempt to, y'now, educate or entertain her audience. I wish I hadn't started it, because then I could have read something else.Plot? There is effectively none. The whole thing is told through a series of side-stories and flashbacks, with the actual conflict resolved in a handful of pages at the back end of the book, about two or three hundred after I started actually, verbally yelling at the thing to get to the point already. Nothing at all is accomplished; Rice cleans up her mythology a little bit and injects a bit more vampiric superpowers into her fictional crush Lestat. This, more than anything, is what grates about the story. Every character spends far too much time worrying over Lestat. It is an elongated aggrandizing, a chance to reiterate just how attractive, devilish, powerful and irresistible the irritating little godlet is. Every other character spends far, far too much time worrying over him, and each mewling phrase sticks out of the narrative like a staple in a quiche. Even the titled Queen of the Damned herself, who at points showed the potential to be a well-realized character with a handful of villainous virtues and flaws, is inevitably defeated because Lestat is just too damned beautiful for anyone to resist. It's tiresome, it's awful, and it makes me angry - because there ARE hints, here and there, of surprising narrative potential, if only when the author pulls her head out of her own ass long enough to write a chapter that has absolutely nothing to do with her favorite dead, white masturbation fodder.Skip it; watch the movie if you must, it's shorter.

Lauren

The Queen of the Damned is strikingly different in both form and substance from the first two books of The Vampire Chronicles. Several new characters are introduced, a number of truly old vampires we have only heard of up until now become part of the action, and the story is woven together into a mosaic much wider in scope from what has come before. This is essentially Lestat's book, but he is not really the focus of the tale; while he narrates his own role in events, much of the book is written in third person. This, plus the addition of so many new characters and the truly elaborate span that is covered, makes this novel much less cohesive than the first-person narratives of the first two books. The action is spread out over six thousand years from one end of the world to the other, with a lot of mythology and pondering taking the place of the thrilling energetic action of earlier novels.The book begins a week or two before Lestat's legendary rock concert and the ensuing mayhem that erupted outside the auditorium that night. We follow the paths of other vampires in the days prior to this, including Armand and Daniel, the young man from Interview With the Vampire. We also learn that the immolation of vampires that Lestat, Louis, and Gabrielle saw that night had actually begun several days earlier, as a number of covens were destroyed by Akasha, the newly awakened Queen of the Damned. After the story of her awakening is told, the book takes a somewhat mystical air. Almost all vampires are dreaming of two red-haired young women preparing to feast upon their dead mother, only to be taken prisoner by soldiers while their village is being destroyed around them. The true significance of the red-haired twins does not become clear until the final hundred pages of the book, for their tale is an integral part of the story behind vampirism's very existence. We already knew that Enkil and Akasha, ancient rulers of Egypt, were the first vampires. Now, the whole history of the King and Queen is revealed, including the curse that accompanied their transformation. Anne Rice goes out of her way to explain the beginning of vampires in a unique way, although the facts of the matter seem a little too elaborate and far-fetched to me.The only real weakness I find in the novel is Akasha's agenda. She is not exactly the altruistic type, and her mission to save mankind sounds ingenuous at best. It is also a rather laughable plan; having spent the past six thousand years in contemplative thought, I would have thought to expect a character of her strength and moxie to have come up with a plan much better than this one. The final conflict, one prefigured for hundreds of pages in the slow unveiling of The Legend of the Twins, ends so quickly I was forced to stop and make sure I hadn't somehow skipped a paragraph or two. Basically it's all over in one sentence. Even Lestat is not himself her; I actually enjoyed the stories of the other vampires and the history of the accidental birth of vampirism in Akash more than I enjoyed the action related first hand by Lestat. Certainly, Rice is to be commended for vastly expanding her vampire universe and having her characters deeply examine their lives and their purpose on earth, but I just could not fully connect with this novel. Still, it is an essential book for Anne Rice fans, as if offers up loads of information about the vampires who roam the world of her creation and explains the very origins of vampirism itself.

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