Euthyphro/Apology/Crito (Theater of the Mind)

ISBN: 1887250050
ISBN 13: 9781887250054
By: Plato Albert A. Anderson Benjamin Jowett Donald Krueger

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Classics Currently Reading Default Greek Literature History Non Fiction Nonfiction Philosophy Plato To Read

About this book

An unabridged oral dramatization of Plato's dialogue in modern English. Professional actors play the characters of Socrates, Euthyphro, Meletus, and Crito. These dialogues are among the best known philosophical works of all time. In dramatic terms, they form a trilogy. The first shows Socrates in action as he enters the courthouse for his own trial. He meets Euthyphro, who has come to indict his own father for murder, and Socrates questions him about the nature of justice and his grounds for taking action against his father. Then Socrates' defense emerges as he answers the charges that he is an atheist and that he has corrupted young people through his kind of education. Finally, in the Crito Socrates is offered a chance to escape from Athens and avoid the death sentence imposed by his fellow citizens. He and Crito discuss the wisdom of going into exile and probe the ultimate foundations of law.

Reader's Thoughts

David Bonesteel

This slim volume collects Plato's dialogues that concern the death of Socrates. In "Euthyphro," Socrates engages the title character in a discussion on the nature of piety on his way to address the Senate. "Apology" is his powerful defense against charges of corrupting the youth of Athens. In "Crito," he explains to friends who would arrange his escape that, having benefited from the laws of the state in the past, he cannot violate them now simply because they inconvenience him.Obviously, these dialogues hold interest for anyone with an interest in the history of Western thought. I was also struck by the drama and humor in F.J. Church's translation. Socrates comes across as a brilliant iconoclast whose self-characterization as an ignorant seeker just trying to get at the truth by cross-examining anyone unfortunate enough to encounter him seems a bit disingenuous and understandably infuriating to the men who would one day condemn him to death. A telling (and funny) line from "Apology" reveals that Socrates was often shadowed by crowds of young men who delighted in his skewering of those complacent enough to think themselves wise.

Joshua

Euthyphro dialogue is the most important thing ever written, LDO.

Matthew

Plato's account of Socrates last days, a kind of Gospel According to Plato. Quite moving

Angela Pattrick

Required reading for my history degree. The unexamined life is no life for a human being to live.

Desaray Granzow

The Apology is really why I have this(not to leave out Crito and Euthyphro - but The Apology is THE work of Socrates whith,I think, the most impact).Learning about what we believe we know of Socrates and his surroundings at the time these works were written - the complex subtext is worth re-examining over the years. I also like to use this work as a learning tool for advanced high school Lincoln Douglas Debate students.

Maureen

In these dialogues, Plato reports on the trial and sentencing of Socrates, and in so doing, outlines his philosophy. Although The Apology is the most famous of the group, I recommend reading all three dialogues together for the most comprehensive overview of Plato's ideas. Socrates has been accused of impiety, and the first dialogue contains his discussion with Euthypro on the nature of piety and impiety. Since Euthypro is on his way to accuse his father of this crime, it is particularly relevant. The discussion highlights the subjective nature of this accusation, because Euthyphro is never able to give Socrates an adequate definition of (im)piety.In The Apology, Socrates stands before his accusers. Their accusations become a platform as much for him to examine their lives as for them to examine his. At one point, Socrates says, "Wherever a man's station is, whether he has chosen it of his own free will, or whether he has been placed at it by his commander, there it is his duty to remain and face the danger without thinking of death or of any other thing except disgrace." This is what Socrates does, though all those around him are losing their heads.After his inevitable sentencing, Crito comes to Socrates' cell, hoping to urge him to escape. Socrates convinces Cato that he, Socrates, should go to his death, in part because it would violate his philosophy of not just living, but living well, to do otherwise. Socrates would rather die than relinquish his philosophy of right thinking.The Phaedo, which is included in my copy, details his subsequent execution by the ingestion of hemlock. From the description, hemlock worked then much in the same way that lethal injection works today. There are a great many worthwhile ideas packed into this little book. If you have not read it, I urge you to do so.

Nicholas Turner

This book was truly interesting. It posed many moral questions and spiritual. Being my first Philosophy book it was a bit hard to understand what was going on at first. If I went back to read it now I'm sure I would rank it higher than a 3/5.

David B

This slim volume collects Plato's dialogues that concern the death of Socrates. In "Euthyphro," Socrates engages the title character in a discussion on the nature of piety on his way to address the Senate. "Apology" is his powerful defense against charges of corrupting the youth of Athens. In "Crito," he explains to friends who would arrange his escape that, having benefited from the laws of the state in the past, he cannot violate them now simply because they inconvenience him.Obviously, these dialogues hold interest for anyone with an interest in the history of Western thought. I was also struck by the drama and humor in F.J. Church's translation. Socrates comes across as a brilliant iconoclast whose self-characterization as an ignorant seeker just trying to get at the truth by cross-examining anyone unfortunate enough to encounter him seems a bit disingenuous and understandably infuriating to the men who would one day condemn him to death. A telling (and funny) line from "Apology" reveals that Socrates was often shadowed by crowds of young men who delighted in his skewering of those complacent enough to think themselves wise.

Rachel

Plato makes Socrates look like a real cool guy.

David

"...your zeal is invaluable, if a right one; but if wrong, the greater the zeal the greater the danger."

Brian

I read this book as a part of my required ethics course in college at the University of Scranton (good olde Jesuit liberal arts education). I love this book. As a result of reading this book and taking the class, I declared Philosophy as my second major. This is a must read for everyone...especially anyone interested in Philosophy or ethics!

Trinity School Summer Reading

An excellent way to meet Socrates, and Socrates is an excellent way to meet philosophy.

Erin

So boring had to read it for a class.

Brandon

The stories in this book follow Socrates as written by Plato. None of the stories are first hand accounts because Socrates felt that something was lost when a tale or argument is written rather than spoken. The main plotline concerns Socrates trial. Euthyphro contains a massive dialogue about the will of the gods and right and wrong, The Defence covers the actual trial of Socrates, and Crito contains a lengthy dialogue about abiding to law for the sake of not undermining the government system. Socrates is portrayed as both wise and arrogant. One cannot help but pity him. He is caught in an ethical dilemma. Does he follow the laws of man, or the laws of his God? The choice Socrates makes costs him his life as he is executed primarily for corrupting the youth.

matt

Still remember the cerebral stretches I underwent when going through the paces of "Euthyphro" as a mere Frosh...

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