Imajica: La Reconciliacion

ISBN: 8498002605
ISBN 13: 9788498002607
By: Clive Barker

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About this book

John Furia Zacharias, Judith Odell y Pai´oh´Pah prosiguen su viaje por dimensiones desconocidas, en busca de la verdad que se oculta en algún lugar de la misteriosa Imajica. Un universo poliédrico y oscuro, regido por leyes más allá de nuestro conocimiento; lejano pero, a la vez, a nuestro alcance. Una historia donde el erotismo y la pasión se entrelazan con el terror y la ambición.

Reader's Thoughts

Derek Brown

2nd in the series. I have the omnibus edition, so see my review of the first book. In a word, Brilliant.

Paul

Wow!! such an fantastic read, I'm a big fan of Barker's Weaveworld but this was even better, compelling characters woven in to a stunning plot. Excellent!!

Karyn

** spoiler alert ** Clive Barker's imagination is a thing of greatness. For the first time in recent memory I was unable to predict where a narrative would take me and I enjoyed the ride thoroughly.The only thing keeping this ending from 5 stars is the amount of unanswered questions bouncing in my skull: Why did Judith end up loving Sartori with no real motivation other than he said he loved her (and knocked her up when she thought he was someone else)? She'd heard that from COUNTLESS men over the course of the entire book but one faker who'd tricked his way into sleeping with her says it and suddenly she's ready to follow him to the ends of the earth? It seemed out of character--I found her very difficult to empathize with by the end, and her sudden (highly annoying) switch to "I don't need a man, I'll just hook up with one of the fish people to help raise God's granddaughter." lost me completely. Jude was so headstrong and determined before and the switch to cooing, bouncing-baby-on-lap mother seemed wrong for her.Why was the Tabula Rosa introduced if they were only going to be slaughtered like cattle and put up no real resistance or create any sort of true conflict? If the Reconciliation was so important, why did the death of about *5* people cause Gentle to quit, run, and hide for 200+ years? I was expecting something on the scale of mass genocide, not a handful of people dead in a small house in London.And most of all, with all the talk of completing the circle and that Creation was both male and female, isn't killing off the masculine God tipping the scales in the other direction? What about balance?But despite these criticisms, this was a fantastic journey and I'm so happy to have finally read it.

Jason

the first part of this was just okay ..the 2nd part got better but then the ending lost me. i would have liked this in 7th grade

Sharen

Imajica is one of my most favorite fantasy books, hands down. Love love love Imajica.

Debra

Stephen King recommended author. He said: "I have seen the future of horror, his name is Clive Barker."

Rachel Pollock

I think dividing Imajica into two books was probably a really excellent idea, but it also has made the structural flaws in the book much more clear. In the first volume, I found myself buoyed along for the ride by the rich madness of the world and the characters, and the towering, lush ambition of the concept. This second volume pretty quickly became a hard slog--lots of meandery drivel, some of the best characters in the first bit killed off or otherwise incapacitated/withdrawn from the story and really not much put into what came to take their places. No more of the ambitiously weird sex of the first volume, and not actually much of the fascinating yet repellant horror either. I wish the author had...i dunno, sat on the book for a while, taken more time away from it, or put more ruthlessness into its revisions. You could probably excise half or more of the second volume, and greatly improve the entirety of Imajica. So, the final verdict on rereading it (since my first time through, ten years ago, i loved it to distraction, categorically, because there just weren't many other books i'd read at the time that had much space or time for complicated women, goddesses, people of nonbinary gender as more than freaky set-dressing, etc.) is that i did enjoy the overall experience of the reread, and where Imajica succeeds, it succeeds so, so fantastically. But i can see it with a more critical eye now, and it--like perhaps everything worthwhile and genuine--is nevertheless a flawed thing.

Eric

(This review is for the whole of Imajica , since it really is a single story.)I liked this book tremendously. It has a very unusual take on the messiah story, and many likable characters. The language is absolutely inspired in places. It does sprawl a lot, which counts against it, but I didn't mind too much.

Jfish938

Was worth reading, but not quite as good as first book.

Charles

One of the best epic fantasy novels ever wrote.

Jenn

Not particularly great; not particularly horrible. The book never seemed to end and the continued over use of sex leaves a dry taste in your mouth. At the same time, there is enough substance and attachment to the character that you do not but the book back on the shelf.

Maria

Excellent Book. I loved it. Also, I liked that all the loose ends were tied up at the end. Even if the book didn't go into detail about everyone you at least knew what most of them got up to after the big event. I wish I could say more. I loved this book. It was magical.

Christine Quiampang Rader

ditto to Book 1.

Tara

Favorite QuotesPerhaps sunlight had always been luminous, and doorways signs of greater passage than that of one room to another. But she’d not noticed it until now.

Mark R.

I finished reading "Imajica" for the third time recently, and regretted that there had been so many years between this and my last reading.The first time I picked it up I only got to read the first volume, through absolutely no fault of my own. The first actual, full reading was a couple years later, and by that time, Clive Barker was my favorite author. I was familiar with his horror stories and novels, and had read some of his more fantasy-oriented books, but "Imajica" truly stands on top of everything else he's done. His newest series, "Abarat," offers a scope and story that's perhaps as ambitious as "Imajica" (it's too early to tell; there are three out of five books remaining to be published in that series); "Everville" and "The Great and Secret Show," both excellent books, also concern other worlds being discovered by regular people on Earth. But this is his best. As Barker states in the foreword, "Imajica" is an attempt at exploring ideas of theology, psychology, geography, through storytelling--and this even is an understatement. The themes that Barker takes on in this book are each enough for their own novel, and yet, it never feels too long, never gets tedious, and is always exciting.

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