Las Peliculas de Mi Vida: Una Novela

ISBN: 0060559403
ISBN 13: 9780060559403
By: Alberto Fuguet

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Genres

Chile Chilean Literature Currently Reading Fiction Latin America Latin American Latin American Literature Read In Spanish Spanish To Read

Reader's Thoughts

Adam

I own the Spanish version of this, and practice reading it out loud sometimes--lots of dialog. I haven't read the English version, so I'm probably missing something.

Denise

This is hands down one of the best books I have ever read. Usually when I like a book, I fly through it. This one took me several weeks to read, and I think it's because I wanted to savor every word...and that I did. I would definitely recommend it.

Robert Beveridge

Alberto Fuguet, The Movies of My Life (Harper, 2003)A trick does not a book make, no matter how interesting it is. And the trick ehre is interesting; Fuguet takes the structure of a noted director (can't remember who, because my brain is swiss cheese; Elia Kazan?)'s autobiography and turns it into the story of a family trying to make it. The beginning works very well, being a series of emails between the narrator and someone he met on a plane about why he's decided to simply abandon his career and sit in a Los Angeles hotel room writing this, and the structure is intriguing, but beauty is only skin-deep. Once you scratch beneath the surface, you find another Oprah's Book Club candidate ripe for the plucking, a dysfunctional family with no qualities to make it stand out from the rest of the dysfunctional family pack so popular in today's publishing world.If you like dysfunctional family novels, this will probably be right up your alley. The rest of you can safely avoid it. (zero)

Orly

Terrible

Bonnie Jeanne

The Movies of My Life by Alberto Fuguet (2003)

Maria Paula Lorgia

Primer Libro de Fuguet, me encantó.

Rodrigo

Curioso libro: ambientada en dos mundos diferentes, pero a la vez muy parecidos - la california de Nixon y el santiago de Pinochet - una novela sobre dos mundos, dos idiomas.

Lize

It's a coming of age tale about a Chilean seismologoist who, on the way to Tokyo for a conference, stops over in LA and decides to hole up in a hotel room and write about his childhood and adolescence in Chile, Los Angeles and back to Chile, with each chapter headed by a movie he saw at the time as a trigger for his memories. It's a neat trick, and since the main character was born in 1964, a lot of the films he references are from a time I remember as well. And it's also how I happened to know something about Chile's earthquake history when the latest one hit over the weekend.

Mariana

Entertaining.

Valeria Wicker

As well as being the first book I read by Fuguet, the back flap of the cover was the first reference to McOndo that I have ever heard. Judging by the brief definition of the genre, I was expecting a work that blatantly attacks Gabriel García Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Isabel Allende and other writers of magic realism while celebrating McDonalds and Coca-Cola. After all, McOndo declares the death of magic realism, a literary staple among the fiction genres of Latin America. What I found was a work that agrees wholeheartedly with the uniqueness of Latin American and Chilean culture but is speaking from a different generation. As well as being the first book I read by Fuguet, the back flap of the cover was the first reference to McOndo that I have ever heard. Judging by the brief definition of the genre, I was expecting a work that blatantly attacks Gabriel García Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Isabel Allende and other writers of magic realism while celebrating McDonalds and Coca-Cola. After all, McOndo declares the death of magic realism in Latin America. What I found was a work that agrees wholeheartedly with the uniqueness of Latin American and Chilean culture but is speaking from a different generation.After guessing wrong at the tone of the book, I repeated the mistake after taking a look at the format. Flipping through the pages, the format looks like a list of movies that the protagonist has seen. I got excited thinking that maybe I would read an intellectual perspective on several classics. As it turns out, this is not the case at all. Rather, the narrator uses the films, many of them forgettable B flicks, to locate the times in his life where formative events occurred. Many times the lighthearted, escapist mood of the film is juxtaposed with the gravity of the estrangement and exile the author experiences. The list has nothing to do with building a relationship with the reader and is completely introspective and therefore autobiographical. There are no obvious ovations made to the reader, the ending is neither epic nor moral.This is an exhorbing portrait of a Chilean adult looking back at his life and past passions. I get the sense that many of the events described come straight from Fuguet's own experiences, but at this point I don't know enough about the author to be sure. In a way, it is not representative of all or even most young Chileans. The narrator spends most of his childhood in California and holds a PhD in seismology. But it has a very subtle and captivating style that keeps the reader turning the pages and enjoying what she finds.

Silvio Curtis

Tiene esa tema favorita de las novelas realísticas, una familia que por razones completamente triviales no es feliz. El protagonista narra su experiencia como un niño en ese familia en el formato de comentarios sobre las películas que veía. Por cada película, cuenta qué pasaba en su vida cuando lo vio y quiénes fueron las personas que lo vieron con él. (¡Yo podría hacer lo mismo con los libros que he leído!) Pero seguro ver las películas me hubiera aburrido menos que leer este libro.

Jonfaith

I read The Movies of My Life by Alberto Fuguet yesterday. Fuguet is one of the leading representitives of McOndo ( a pun on the mythic region of Garcia Marquez's Cien Anos) which is known for being hyperviolent, bilingual and self-referential. The book started strong, noting the mindest of the seismologist protagonist. It has an unconvincing turn and then the subsequent narrative appeared under-developed. That said, I remainc urious about this contemporary movement. I am unsure where to proceed next

Maria

I hated this book in the beginning, but it started to turn around by the second half. I read if for a book club. I didn't finish reading in time for the book club, but our discussion was interesting enough that I wanted to see how it turned out. In the end I liked it okay.

Avery

Alberto Fuguet é um chileno dedicado a criar um novo movimento nas letras latino-americanas, um movimento disposto a se contrapor ao realismo fantástico de Gabriel García-Márquez e que se chama... McCondo. Rarara.Fuguet escreveu um livro chamado "Os filmes da minha vida", que não causa surpresas estilísticas nem consegue inaugurar nada de novo, mas tem a capacidade de gerar lembranças em gente que viveu algo parecido. Eu, por exemplo, e minha infância na Venezuela.O fato de ter vivido noutro país, de conviver com duas línguas e se sentir estrangeiro onde quer que esteja é uma sensação que conheço bem, mas acaba aí. Os filmes que ele assistiu, também os vi - inclusive coisas obscuras interessantes, que pouca gente lembra - mas são coadjuvantes das ações do personagem principal e mal recebem uma análise superficial.O escritor parece tão disposto a comer um Big McCondo que esquece as tortillas, ignora vulcões e povos indígenas. Sua prosa é norte-americana mas não espere encontrar Dellilo, Auster ou Hemingway neste misto de pretensão vanguardista e ultra-americanismo chicano.

Donald Quist

Better left a blog entry. A disappointing effort from one of the leaders of one of the biggest literary movements in recent memory, Mcondo.

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