Las Peliculas de Mi Vida: Una Novela

ISBN: 0060559403
ISBN 13: 9780060559403
By: Alberto Fuguet

Check Price Now

Genres

Chile Chilean Literature Currently Reading Fiction Latin America Latin American Latin American Literature Read In Spanish Spanish To Read

Reader's Thoughts

Bonnie Jeanne

The Movies of My Life by Alberto Fuguet (2003)

Maria Paula Lorgia

Primer Libro de Fuguet, me encantó.

Silvio Curtis

Tiene esa tema favorita de las novelas realísticas, una familia que por razones completamente triviales no es feliz. El protagonista narra su experiencia como un niño en ese familia en el formato de comentarios sobre las películas que veía. Por cada película, cuenta qué pasaba en su vida cuando lo vio y quiénes fueron las personas que lo vieron con él. (¡Yo podría hacer lo mismo con los libros que he leído!) Pero seguro ver las películas me hubiera aburrido menos que leer este libro.

Heather Mize

Alberto Fuguet goes out of his way to alienate his reader, which made me wonder why he thought a reader would care enough to read his memoir. I felt like his title "the movies of my life" was also deceiving. While there is a list of movies it is essentially meaningless in the scheme of the stories. They have little or nothing to do with the movies, and the impact they had on his life, but rather are used like markers in a timeline. A more realistic title would be the "years of my life" and his stories could be seperated by years instead of movie titles. I despise this kind of trickery in books, feeling as if it's a marketing technique but clearly Fuguet needed some kind of trick as I am still wondering why he would feel someone would be interested in his story. I didn't connect or relate to him, and found him to be rude, self-pitying, empty, and arrogant.

Donald Quist

Better left a blog entry. A disappointing effort from one of the leaders of one of the biggest literary movements in recent memory, Mcondo.

Pablo Paz

muy bueno. me encantó la breve aparición del paz y el vicuña en el juanchos.. muy chevre

Aurora

il libro si legge velocemente e se non fosse che - giustamente - cita solo film degli anni 70, beh... darebbe anche un po' di spunti.è molto interessante vedere come certi schemi si ripetono al di là delle nazionalità, dei luoghi dove si vive, dei rapporti sociali che si hanno. ovviamente invece altre cose non sono assolutamente ripetibili, e certi dolori, certe strutture sociali sono vissute solo in quel luogo, in quel tempo, da quelle persone.idea non banale, scrittura buona. "l'orrore dello sradicamento è mitigato quando le condizioni di vita di là, nel nuovo paese, sono sensibilmente migliori. quando il nuovo paese ti offre qualcosa che il tuo non poteva darti: lavoro, libertà, amore, conoscenza. ma il cile non offriva niente di tutto ciò. non a me, almeno."

Jonfaith

I read The Movies of My Life by Alberto Fuguet yesterday. Fuguet is one of the leading representitives of McOndo ( a pun on the mythic region of Garcia Marquez's Cien Anos) which is known for being hyperviolent, bilingual and self-referential. The book started strong, noting the mindest of the seismologist protagonist. It has an unconvincing turn and then the subsequent narrative appeared under-developed. That said, I remainc urious about this contemporary movement. I am unsure where to proceed next

Valeria Wicker

As well as being the first book I read by Fuguet, the back flap of the cover was the first reference to McOndo that I have ever heard. Judging by the brief definition of the genre, I was expecting a work that blatantly attacks Gabriel García Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Isabel Allende and other writers of magic realism while celebrating McDonalds and Coca-Cola. After all, McOndo declares the death of magic realism, a literary staple among the fiction genres of Latin America. What I found was a work that agrees wholeheartedly with the uniqueness of Latin American and Chilean culture but is speaking from a different generation. As well as being the first book I read by Fuguet, the back flap of the cover was the first reference to McOndo that I have ever heard. Judging by the brief definition of the genre, I was expecting a work that blatantly attacks Gabriel García Marquez, Alejo Carpentier, Isabel Allende and other writers of magic realism while celebrating McDonalds and Coca-Cola. After all, McOndo declares the death of magic realism in Latin America. What I found was a work that agrees wholeheartedly with the uniqueness of Latin American and Chilean culture but is speaking from a different generation.After guessing wrong at the tone of the book, I repeated the mistake after taking a look at the format. Flipping through the pages, the format looks like a list of movies that the protagonist has seen. I got excited thinking that maybe I would read an intellectual perspective on several classics. As it turns out, this is not the case at all. Rather, the narrator uses the films, many of them forgettable B flicks, to locate the times in his life where formative events occurred. Many times the lighthearted, escapist mood of the film is juxtaposed with the gravity of the estrangement and exile the author experiences. The list has nothing to do with building a relationship with the reader and is completely introspective and therefore autobiographical. There are no obvious ovations made to the reader, the ending is neither epic nor moral.This is an exhorbing portrait of a Chilean adult looking back at his life and past passions. I get the sense that many of the events described come straight from Fuguet's own experiences, but at this point I don't know enough about the author to be sure. In a way, it is not representative of all or even most young Chileans. The narrator spends most of his childhood in California and holds a PhD in seismology. But it has a very subtle and captivating style that keeps the reader turning the pages and enjoying what she finds.

Ryan

So I wasn't too crazy about this one. It started off with some intrigue as you get to know the main character and begin to wonder how he got so intense, lonely and estranged from his family. I started to wonder, perhaps he felt that his intelligence alienated him from everyone else and he sought the kind of solace you can only get from a physics book. Perhaps there was a terrible tragedy that befell his entire family and he was the cause. Perhaps a he caused a terrible accident and has been guilt stricken ever since.Turns out, he's the son of immigrants who move back to Chile. Now, I don't mean to belittle the plot; this book may well speak to many people. I half expected it to speak to me, as I've often felt like a wanderer myself, but I just couldn't relate.It was a fast read, mostly because it's arranged in bite-sized chunks centered around movies, but I didn't feel any momentum. It wasn't really heading anywhere, and I grew impatient with the meandering.

Adam

I own the Spanish version of this, and practice reading it out loud sometimes--lots of dialog. I haven't read the English version, so I'm probably missing something.

Bria

Meh, I didn’t really understand the connection between the movies, earthquakes and the character’s up-brining. They seemed more of a throw away device rather than something integral to progressing narrative. I didn’t find myself very interested in the character’s life nor did I understand the significance of LA and why he did not continue on his travels at this point. Was this to do with happy memories of his childhood and parent’s marriage before they returned to Chile? Many of the secondary characters seemed undeveloped and sometimes I even lost track of the various relationships.

Pabloamn

Creo que esta novela es la mejor lograda de Fuguet. A pesar de sus tintes autobiográficos, los cuales son itinerantes en cada creación de este escritor, es interesante el recorrido que hace el autor desde los sesenta ambientados en California hasta los ochenta de Pinochet en Chile. Se viven esos periodos desde otra perspectiva. Como siempre creo que esos datos hacen más rica a la historia, y hacen que uno se adentre en la novela.

Maria

I hated this book in the beginning, but it started to turn around by the second half. I read if for a book club. I didn't finish reading in time for the book club, but our discussion was interesting enough that I wanted to see how it turned out. In the end I liked it okay.

Rodrigo

Curioso libro: ambientada en dos mundos diferentes, pero a la vez muy parecidos - la california de Nixon y el santiago de Pinochet - una novela sobre dos mundos, dos idiomas.

Share your thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *