Love to Eat, Hate to Eat

ISBN: 0736914382
ISBN 13: 9780736914383
By: Elyse M. Fitzpatrick

Check Price Now

Genres

Biblical Counseling Christian Christianity Currently Reading Faith Gospel Non Fiction To Read To Read Counseling Women

About this book

More than 80 percent of all Americans have been on a diet at some point in their lives. Isn't there a better way to break the cycle in the battle of the bulge? This title helps them: identify destructive eating habits; break the vicious cycle of emotional eating; and, develop a flexible plan suited to unique situations.

Reader's Thoughts

Jacqui

This is not a good book. Elyse's theology has obviously taken a big turn since she wrote this and I don't recommend this book. Her later work is much better and more comforting. Basically the major error she makes in this book is trying to fix someone's failure at keeping the law with more law. No Gospel comforts to be found here ladies. She sticks the gospel in here and there but there is no connection between it and the law everywhere else in the book and therefore it becomes ineffective at helping the reader to find the solution to their idolatry.

Mschenk

A biblical view of a mindset towards food. It changed my world because it opened my eyes to see my sin in the area of food and it gave me hope to change. It is practical and good to read by yourself or with a friend!

Molly

The most Biblical view I have ever read about food and eating and the heart issues that surround them. Changed forever how I approach a meal.

Mindi

From the title you know the book is all about eating. Well, it is, but it's also about so much more. This helps you determine destructive eating habits and what causes them, even though you desire to be in control. If you truly struggle with food, this book takes the biblical approach to help you understand why food is such a big component of your life. Scriptures are provided throughout the book to help you along the way. You can really expect to be on the path to change once you begin reading and as chapter one states, there is hope for you. As always, this change will not happen simply by reading this book, you have CLAIM the change and make it happen! For those who know the difficulties of struggling with weight issues, I think this is journey that can be shared. In some cases, you might prefer to take this spiritual journey alone. I did. I am on the path towards change and I know it! As long as I move forward, I am headed in the right direction.

Butch

Though written to women, Elyse Fitzpatrick does a great job of outlining the spiritual battle that is behind our struggles with food. Very helpful. There are also some broadcasts with her that can be found on FamilyLife Today at www.familylifetoday.com. Search for past broadcasts by Elyse Fitzpatrick.

Sarah Voth

You don't have to struggle with destructive eating habits to gain valuable insight from this book. If you have ever felt "guilty" for eating ... if you have ever felt "pure" or "virtuous" by eating (or avoiding eating) certain foods, this book is for you. Elyse Fitzpatrick does a wonderful job of presenting scriptural answers to the question, "What does God say about my eating habits?" Not just disordered habits (bingeing, purging, restricting) but also the habits we might consider honorable (eating carefully, avoiding certain foods, being "good"). The book can be summed up by one question, "In my eating and drinking, am I glorifying God?" I particularly loved the biblical definition of gluttony: "Gluttony is more than overeating. In its association with drunkenness, it describes a life given to excess. [...] As long as what you eat dominates your affections, thoughts, and behavior - even if you are eating small potions, starving yourself, or insisting on eating only "healthy foods" - your eating is gluttonous because your life is focused on food." Gluttony is not defined by weight, but defined by the heart!I really wish this book had integrated Intuitive Eating principles from a biblical perspective, and rejected the dieting/weight loss mentality all together. Fitzpatrick did a rockstar job of getting to the heart of eating issues; after all, it's not really about the food at all, is it? However, it would've been nice to see her take scripture a step further in practical application. I use Intuitive Eating (IE) principles every day in counseling; I find them so helpful. For a quick list of these IE principles, see http://www.intuitiveeating.org/conten...Certain parts of the book made my nutrition-therapist red-flags go up. For instance, I would completely disregard the section about "daily allotment of calories" on pp 128. The caloric totals she presents are way, way too low. And if you are trying to recover from destructive eating habits, I would implore you to stop counting calories all together. There are other ways of meal planning that do not involve counting calories and fat grams!And while food journaling can be a useful tool, I would caution against journaling daily calories for longer than a few days. It can quickly evolve into its own source of bondage. Journaling emotions, on the other hand, can be super helpful and revealing about our attitudes about food. In this, the book is very good about encouraging. And the scripture that she provides in each chapter is wonderful. But on the whole, I really appreciated this book. I will be reading it again.

Paul

Although the author writes for women I'm sure that men are at least as bad if not worse than women when it comes to self control in the area of eating at least judging by the external evidence.The writer provides an extensive case for the need for discipline in this as well as other areas as a fruit of the Spirit in the life of the Christian. She supports her case with extensive scripture references and careful application. Helpful practical tips are also included.

Amy Kannel

Hugely convicting and beneficial for me--though I have never struggled with being overweight, I've absolutely had out-of-control eating habits and a sinful relationship to food. Elyse doesn't mince words, but she saturates the book with the gospel so that you're led from your sin to the beauty and mercy of God. I've revisited this more than once.

Lindsay Hall

I bought this book because I have trouble saying no to sweets. I was really hoping it would help to illuminate what goes on in my spirit when I indulge in emotional eating, and it did. Although I do not have an eating disorder, I greatly benefitted from the way Fitzpatrick broke down how patterns of eating can be sin. The Scripture she used and the common sense she used was really helpful in identifying my own eating patterns that are sinful, and she does a good job of offering practical help for breaking those patterns without prescribing a dieting plan. For those who do have eating disorders, I recommend this book, and for those who don't but who have partiular eating habits they would like to break, I also recommend this book.

Brielle

Love to Eat, Hate to Eat is a very good book for addressing not only eating disorders, but even just the common phobias of fat-ness and pre-occupation with appearance. It doesn't deal with just practicals, but zooms out to deal with bigger heart issues.

Alexis Neal

Meaty, convicting, and hard hitting. Not sure whether I will actually have the discipline to put her principles into practice, but her analysis of the issues is spot-on. She keeps the gospel in view at all times and does a good job both challenging and encouraging the reader. The book targets women who struggle with sinful eating habits, but I would recommend this book to anyone--male OR female--who's ever wrestled with bringing any desire under the lordship of Christ.

Debra Lara

Loved it! We need to glorify God with the way we treat our bodies.

Stevie

I was very encouraged when reading this book. I felt like the Lord was telling me to stop being lazy with my thought life and rigorously guard what I thought upon.

Stephanie

A friend is going to be starting a book club and this is the first book. Can't wait! She's my kind of gal! (and a left-hander!) Bought this for Kindle.

Jackie Gilliam

Good resource with applications beyond the battle of proper views of food.

Share your thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *