North And South

ISBN: 0543904024
ISBN 13: 9780543904027
By: Elizabeth Gaskell

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19th Century Classic Classics Currently Reading Favorites Fiction Historical Historical Fiction Romance To Read

About this book

North and South depicts a young woman discovering herself, in a nuanced portrayal of what divides people, and what brings them together.Elizabeth Gaskell's compassionate, richly dramatic novel features one of the most original and fully-rounded female characters in Victorian fiction, Margaret Hale. It shows how, forced to move from the country to an industrial town, she develops a passionate sense of social justice, and a turbulent relationship with mill-owner John Thornton.

Reader's Thoughts

Kirstine

So many things to talk about, I don’t know where to begin. I’ll begin with Margaret Hale, arguably one of my favorite heroines of all time. She not only deals with the loss of family, fortune and status, she also has to leave behind the life she loved in the South and adapt to the new and harsh conditions of the North. She never loses her dignity or her compassion, and she stays ever true to herself. “I wish I could tell you how lonely I am. How cold and harsh it is here. Everywhere there is conflict and unkindness. I think God has forsaken this place. I believe I have seen hell and it's white, it's snow-white.”When entering Milton she embodies the softness of the south, and is very naïve and ignorant of the ways of life in the city. She is, at first glance, the opposite of Mr. Thornton who possesses all the steel, cold resolution and unforgiving ways of the north, and they immediately clash. However, on further inspection they appear quite similar. They are both hardworking and humble, they are loyal to friends and family, although both very capable of rational thought, Margaret is more passionate and open, where Thornton is closed off and logical. I’ve read that Elizabeth Gaskell wanted to name this novel after Margaret, and I understand perfectly why. She is after all the center of the novel. She bridges the gaps that others avoid, between femininity and masculinity, the modern and the traditional, the lower class and the upper class. She is a catalyst and a negotiator. She is in so many ways the most complex character of them all, forced by circumstance to take on situations and roles that aren’t ‘for women’, and that she herself is unsure she can accomplish, but finding she is more than capable of taking them on. “Margaret had always dreaded lest her courage should fail her in any emergency, and she should be proved to be, what she dreaded lest she was--a coward. But now, in this real great time of reasonable fear and nearness of terror, she forgot herself, and felt only an intense sympathy--intense to painfulness--in the interests of the moment.” She is young enough not to be stubborn in her beliefs, yet gifted with an introspective mind and enough self-awareness that she is unafraid to fight for the beliefs she deems worthy, often causing her to clash with Mr. Thornton (and earning his reluctant admiration). She is not immediately accepting of the north, but adapts faster and better than both her parents. She’s initially full of scorn for Mr. Thornton and his methods and beliefs, but eventually, as she gains friends and learns to appreciate the north, she comes to understand him. Mr. Thornton, on the other hand, is almost immediately taken with Ms. Hale and spends practically the entire novel madly in love with her,“If Mr. Thornton was a fool in the morning, as he assured himself at least twenty times he was, he did not grow much wiser in that afternoon. All that he gained in return for his sixpenny omnibus ride, was a more vivid conviction that there never was, never could be, any one like Margaret; that she did not love him and never would; but that she — no! nor the whole world — should never hinder him from loving her.” This is something I’ve noticed in Jane Austen novels as well, the men tend to notice faster than the women that they’re in love and both Elizabeth Bennet and Margaret Hale have the pleasure of being outraged at and heatedly turning down a marriage proposal. I wonder if it is a conscious thing, to give these men a softer disposition towards love. If maybe it was the 1800s way of making them vulnerable and putting them in a rare position of powerlessness. Or is it a way of asserting a given woman’s independence? Is this rejection of marriage – and financial stability and status – the best way to let your readers understand that she is free? Perhaps. Maybe it’s both. It’s an interesting thought, at least. Someone might try to sell you this book by calling it a romance novel, and you might be disappointed. It is, before everything, a novel about a young woman coming to terms with her own independence. Set during the industrial revolution it addresses the immense social changes that come with it. Financial success is more and more a product of hard work, but is correspondingly something you might quickly lose all over again. It is a novel of great changes and opposing ideals constantly conflicting. Anyone who doesn’t adapt won't thrive. This is yet another thing Thornton and Margaret have in common, they both adapt to their circumstances. Margaret adapts to her new life in the north, and Thornton adapts to the rapid industrial progress by cooperating with his workers, instead of merely commanding them. I know many of you will be reading this because of the romance, and I can’t blame you. As with Elizabeth Bennet, Margaret’s love for Thornton doesn't blossom until she has reached a complete understanding of him. Here it could end, but Gaskell takes another more progressive step, and it isn't until they meet as equals that her love is finally professed and his repeated. Beautiful. (It might be that the miniseries brought you here, but if it isn’t then I can only recommend you watch it. It is a truly excellent adaptation.)

David

An easy test of whether you'll like this book is whether you like Gaskell's contemporaries: George Eliot and Charles Dickens are the most obvious, though the plot borrows a bit of Jane Eyre and a bit of Pride and Prejudice. Gaskell writes closer to Eliot's style, but with a bit of Dickens's social consciousness. In the end, North and South ends up a romance, but the romantic obstacle course navigated by the romantic leads is not the most compelling element.North and South features as the protagonist 19-year-old Margaret Hale, whose father, upon having a crisis of conscience, quits his job as a country parson in idyllic southern England and moves his wife and daughter north to the industrial cotton-mill town of Milton. To say Margaret and her mother don't like their new home is an understatement — they hate it, and Margaret is certainly not enamored of the wealthy industrialist Mr. Thornton, who, undaunted by either her mannerly disdain or his mother's cold mercenary disapproval, is struck with love at first sight. (I felt this was one of the weakest parts of the book, as it's never explained just what made this prissy southern girl so irresistible to him.) He then spends the rest of the novel being in love with her despite resigning himself to not having a chance with her, and Margaret spends the rest of the novel denying that she feels anything but disdain for him, while constantly worrying about what he thinks of her.This thread winds it way through much more compelling and illustrative social dramas: workers' strikes and grinding poverty, the bustling but harrowing rise of English industry that made many people rich and many more people soot-covered beggars. Here, Gaskell stays more refined and less comical than Dickens; her poor are not grotesque caricatures, but hard and not always sympathetic people.Margaret is a well-educated country girl, and her mother is a typical upper-class housewife. The Hales aren't used to these northerners who speak bluntly, tell you exactly what they think of you, ask personal questions, and talk openly about money.Mostly we see Milton and its northern ways through Margaret's eyes, and Gaskell invokes some of the social issues of the time, as when a poor family Margaret befriends gets caught up in a millworkers' strike. At first, Mr. Thornton seems like your basic hard-hearted capitalist oppressing his workers, but Gaskell slowly draws out more nuanced arguments: Thornton is a hard, proud, mercenary man, but he's upright and honorable and he's earned his fortune the hard way. And the millworkers, while legitimately oppressed, are not exactly angels and they believe some really stupid things. The tone swings back and forth between pro-capitalist parochialism and a more humanitarian saga; Gaskell writes about economics and class warfare more convincingly than most of her peers. She doesn't have Dickens's sharp edge, but she isn't writing social satire.Honestly, I could have done without the obligatory Jane Eyre-ish happy ending altogether. And Margaret Hale, while she certainly has a voice and a personality, was a little too simpering at times (though not as bad as Fanny Price). I thought the social issues and the secondary characters were more interesting than the Lovestruck Capitalist and the almost-perfect protagonist. This was a fine novel - I'm only dinging it a star because Gaskell's writing didn't quite stand out enough to distinguish it from all the other books I've been comparing it to.

Apatt

For some reason I confused this novel with the John Jakes book of the same title and I wondered why a young female Victorian author would have written a book about American Civil War. Any way, when I started writing this review I sat for minutes staring at the blinking curser wondering how I should begin. The first paragraph is often the hardest as there is no momentum to speak of. So I thought I would cheat a bit and have a look around other GR reviews for inspiration (or something to rip off). Interestingly practically all of them mention the BBC's 2004 TV adaptation. The BBC's mini-series is very popular and highly rated (see IMDB), it basiaccly brought North and South back in vogue. The only snag is I have not seen it so the novel just made a transition from my reading bucket list to my DVD one. OK, that is enough shoehorning of the BBC thing, I got my first paragraph.North and South is a social / romance hybrid novel, if Dickens had collaborated with Austen they may have come up with North and South, especially if Thomas Hardy e-mailed them some suggestions resulting in a number of deaths to put our protagonist through the wringer. The book starts off inauspiciously with some old ladies discussing desirable marriages. This Austenesq scenario almost sent me packing there and then but as I was only a couple of pages in I thought perhaps I should give Ms. Gaskell more of a chance. It is well that I did because North and South soon become much more meaningful and heartfelt.Our heroine Margaret Hale has much more to do in this story than looking for a suitable husband. She has to move with her parents from a picturesque agricultural town to a busy smoky industrial one. This requires considerable attitude adjustment. To make matters worse her nearest and dearest start dropping dead like flies. The only bright spots seem to be her meeting stuffy but interesting industrialist Mr. John Thornton and making some working class pals. Her eventful life in Milton includes inadvertently getting involved in a violent factory workers strike and almost getting stoned to death for her troubles, not to mention unintentionally causing stiff upper lipped Mr. Thornton to fall violently in love with her. What makes this book special is the characterization. The characters are very vivid, complex and believable. Starting with the protagonist Margaret Hale who is of the “still water runs deep” archetype; hardly an original characterization but she is so well developed that you cannot help but become emotionally involved in her plight. Then we have Mr. Thornton who seems to be a graduate of the Darcy School of Haughtiness. His mother is wonderful, a tough as nails lady with a heart of gold who I cannot help but visualize as looking and sounding Kathy Bates. There are too many characters to mention and every one of them come alive through Gaskell’s narrative. Equally important is the plot, the social aspect of the story. The trade off between profitability and the welfare of the workers. The communication failure and misunderstanding between employers and employees. Both sides are often at war because they assume the worst of the other and act on those assumptions without attempting negotiations. Such problems still exist today though they were much more severe in the 19th century.I suspect 90% of the trouble and heartaches in Victorian fiction would never occur if people, workers and lovers alike, would only speak their minds, make it their top priority to clear up misunderstandings. The only problem with that is that we would end up with nothing left to read. North and South is beautifully written and overflowing with pathos, be sure to have a box of Kleenex within arm’s reach should you attempt it. There are minor flaws in the plot contrivances such as several characters suddenly dropping dead in fairly rapid succession just to serve the plot, not from any contagion either. The romantic wrap up at the end is also a little too rushed given the very gradual buildup throughout the book.Still, I love books that push “the feels” button and this book does that beautifully. Read it and weep my friends.

Zeek

First- I watched the BBC miniseries for Gaskell’s North and South long before I read the novel and I have to say... I’m so glad I did! What an awesome thing to have the perfect cast that was BBC North and South running around in my head as I read this! Second- Richard Armitage portrayed Thornton perfectly- not a perfect match to the book- but perfectly how I would relate best to him. It was fun though, getting in his head a bit more- I actually believe all the feelings seen in the book were inside RA’s portrayal- he just expressed it through his eyes and silence. I’m serious- he spoke volumes when he said nothing at all- and Holy COW did it make the story all the richer.But we’re talking about the book- so here goes.Written in the 1850’s as a social novel on industrial class vs common worker- let’s face it, Gaskell is no D H Lawerance. And THANK GOD- (man I hated Lady Chatterly’s Lover). Unlike his work, I found North and South engaging AND it made a point- albeit better formed in the tv series. Sure it's no high brow novel, but I sometimes get tired of those stories that think itself rather important. So important it doesnt mind leaving behind the reader to make it's overblown point.Set in Milton, a fictional town in the North of England, North and South opens with our heroine, Margaret Hale, living in the peaceful south of England, but soon forced to leave her home for the dirty, smoky Milton. It’s harsh in the industiral North and utterly foreign to the life she once lived- even down to how a northerner welcomes a lady vs a southern way. Because she’s no shinking violet, despite her upbringing, she quickly finds herself in the middle of a clash between employers and workers- with her having “friends” on both sides. On the one hand, her first real friends are the lower class Higgons’ whom welcome her despite their differences. On the other hand- the Thorntons, led by Mr. Thornton, not titled, but a captain of the Cotton trade. He helps Margaret’s father settle in even as Mr. Hale, an educated man who left the vicarage on some vague matter of conscious, tutors Mr. Thornton, whom obviously values education. Despite this, immediately Mr. Thornton and Margaret clash, for he’s instantly attracted to her and she’s startled by his forceful opinions and attitudes toward the workers who have now become her friends.Misunderstandings ensue between them ala Darcy and Lizzie Bennet, even down to a rejected proposal, but, in the end, they soften each other and find a balance- both between their feelings for each other and differences between workers and employers around the time of the first organized strikes.Seriously, I enjoyed this book. I think the author did a fantastic job of making the reader feel sympathetic to the working poor by couching a romance in the midst of the turmoil.If you’re a romance lover but not into reading the classics, do yourself a favor and rent the dvd. You’ll thank me for it.

Myriam

I loved this novel.I loved the pace, the beautiful writing that was intricate and elegant, the way we were allowed insight into many characters without it ever feeling like too much. I loved the characters, flawed and relatable. I loved the conversations about class, workers, strikes and other matters related to business in a country that was rapidly changing. I loved how the novel contained just enough detail.A highly readable and enjoyable classic.You can watch my complete review here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FC-8x...

D.G.

Like some of my fellow reviewers, I've seen the BBC production and loved it but kinda hated Miss Hale - probably because I thought she was a snobbish, cold, b.... who in my humble opinion wasn't fit to even lick Mr. Thornton's boots - so I decided to read the book in hopes of redeeming her. Not that I got to like her but reading the book made me understand her better.I'm partial to passionate, brooding heroes so of course, I was quite taken with Mr. Thornton - both Armitage's and the book's. I relished the opportunity of getting into Mr. Thornton's thoughts and seeing what he really thought.One thing from the book that I don't think the BBC production really captured was Margaret's feelings for Mr. Thornton and how at the end, they were more on an even playing field. That is, she was as in loved (obsessed with him) as he had been with her. The BBC's Miss Hale remained a cold, somewhat condescending woman who doesn't seem to care for him very much. I really didn't get why she accepted him at the end.There is some similarity to Pride & Prejudice but this book is a lot darker and I could even say more 'relatable' (if that's a word) to modern sensibilities, with its comment on class strife and a very strong heroine (she has her good points, you know) who cares for others less fortunate than herself and despite her youth, deals with very painful circumstances with a lot of courage and aplomb.

Sherwood Smith

Reread yesterday. Gaskell is at her best with the tiny details of life that make the characters and the setting come to life: Margaret sitting on the worn carpet before the fire, the candles unlit until her parents appear. The observation about how two people, left alone in an enormous room, will speak in low voices as if "unwilling to awaken the unused echoes."Gaskell's side characters are delightfully rounded, even if her hero and heroine are a tad too uprightly conventional: Mrs. Thornton's conflicted character shows signs of the beautiful characterizations to come in Wives and Daughters. Ditto Fanny Thornton and Edith, Mr. Bell and Mr. Higgins.On the downside she is still using standard Victorian tropes--lingering sentimental deathbeds, wise suffering children (Bessie is very hard to take), sudden deaths as plot conveniences. It can be said that sudden death was a part of life at that time, but there are a lot of them here, and Mr. Bell's convenient appearance at the end (rather than when he should have come, before the Hales had to go to Milton in the first place) and his equally convenient death diminishes the dramatic impact even as it gives the requisite happy ending. Then there is the unconvincing Frederick/Leonards bit of violence, as if Gaskell shrank from convincing detail, whereas a scene I think was meant to be funny about boiling a cat to death is shocking and horrid--reminding us of very different attitudes of the time.One more observation, something I've noticed in Gaskell and Elliott and several other Victorian writers, how they go on and on about women's throats. Is this supposed to be covert sexiness? The arched and swan-like columned throats are peculiar but persistent through literature of this period. I should do a read to see if male writers use it as ubiquitously as female writers do.

Anneliese Bennion

On Sunday evening I finished reading Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South. It's the book they based the wonderful BBC movie on, in case you were wondering. It took me three weeks, maybe four to read this novel. I think that's the longest time I've spent with a book this year (not including when I've reread some of my favorites). A couple of years back I remember starting this book, but for some reason or another I didn't finish it. Just recently I came upon a website that posted pictures from the movie with captions either from the movie, different actors/directors and captions from the book. In going through these pictures and quotes, episode by episode, I felt a great need to try and read this book again.This time, I was much more thorough. I kept a yellow marker with me whenever I read it so that I could highlight my favorite parts - which mostly included anything romantic or anything that peaked my interest.I gave it 5 stars. It really was excellently written in beautiful style. I think it was as enjoyable and satisfying as any Jane Austen book. I just loved the language and images that she described. She originally wrote it for a magazine/newspaper that Charles Dickens edited. It was written like a serial. There are 52 chapters, each of which are never more than 10 pages long. I loved it because whenever I had time to sit down and read it, I could always finish a chapter.Now, into the story itself. It struck me how everyone around Margaret used her. She is portrayed as a strong, independent, beautiful woman. But for all that, her goodness was always taken advantage. First with her father. He tells her about his decision to leave the church. It was very hard for him to tell her and very hard for her to hear. However, he doesn't feel like he can tell his wife, so he asks/makes Margaret do it. Later on, Margaret is required to keep the secret of her mother's illness. Not only that, but she's also required to tend to her as well. Then, her brother, inadvertently uses her to cover up their involvement in the death of Leonards. Over and over, these things happen. Even her cousin uses her as a nurse maid for her children. I was frustrated for her. She should not have been put in those situations, especially if she was as strong and independent as she is described.It's interesting note the passing of time in this book. Margaret spent two years in Milton, in which both of her parents died and her good friend Bessy Higgins. Then she leaves and moves back to London. She is there for a year, in which Mr. Bell dies and in the end she accepts Mr. Thornton's proposal. When I watched the movie I was not aware of this movement of time.I loved reading the thoughts of both Margaret and Mr. Thornton. At first they were attracted to each other. Then Margaret is disillusioned with him and really doesn't give him any thought until the strike. Mr. Thornton on the other hand, is captivated from the beginning. However, like Mr. Darcy, he failed in courting her and thus his proposal was refused. It is after this refusal that Margaret starts thinking more about him. Then, when she lies about her brother, she cannot stand the fact that Mr. Thornton knew she was lying, but did not have the courage to dissuade him of this. Whenever she thinks about him she suppresses investigating all of her feelings. After the refusal Mr. Thornton tries to prove to the world that he is not pining over Margaret. He even tries to put himself in her company, to prove his self mastery to himself. While all of the time loving her more and more, even though hope of marriage has died. Then in the end when they meet up again as equals in each other's eyes - it's just magnificent. It was wonderful!As for the rest of the novel, it was quite enjoyable. I was interested in the workings of not only the commerce in Milton vs. London, but also in the societal differences as well. The characters were well written and each provided their own poignancy to the story. All in all it was a delightful read.

Emma Deplores Goodreads Censorship

Caution: Spoilers and Snark abound!I’m afraid this review will not be popular with fans of the author, or those who see classic literature as unassailable. But after slogging through this book (especially so soon after discovering Villette, a truly excellent classic!), I feel obliged to warn potential readers, and let those who were disappointed with the book but wary about criticizing a classic know that they aren’t alone.So, then: a recipe for North and South:- Add one romantic plotline borrowed straight from Pride and Prejudice, only the leads’ arguments are about labor relations. Also, after the disastrous proposal scene, don't let him write a letter and so keep the relationship on hold until the last two pages. (These reviews lay out many more similarities between the two books that I have not repeated here.)- Add some poor families/dying children borrowed straight from Dickens, only keep the deaths off-page.- Add at least 6 character deaths, almost all off-page. The deaths and subsequent grieving can substitute for a plot throughout the second half of the book.- Add 1 Mary Sue, otherwise known as Margaret Hale. Everybody must worship Margaret. Include sentences such as “Martha, like all who came in contact with Margaret.... felt it a pleasure and an honour to forward any of her wishes.” Ensure that even Lady Catherine.... sorry, Mrs. Thornton.... is melted by her lovely eyes and straightforward demeanor. Have characters berate each other for not singing her praises enthusiastically enough, then report the incident to Margaret with concern. (I am not making this up!) Also, describe her constantly. Like when she meets the leading man for the first time. Don’t describe him, describe her! Again!- Add many interior monologues by the leading man detailing his feelings for Margaret. Think you have enough? Try doubling that. We want to know EXACTLY how in love with her he is.- Add a handful of goofy, melodramatic scenes and startling coincidences. (I shudder when I think of that riot scene....) While these may threaten any feelings of authenticity the plot may have had, at least they'll keep it moving when you run out of deaths.- Add 4 cups of tedium. Mix well.- If you are Penguin Classics: sprinkle useless, spoiler-laden endnotes (such as, after Margaret shares her views of a subject in Chapter 1, “Margaret painfully revises her view of X after the deaths of A and B”) throughout. This is super easy to do because all you have to do is find really obvious points in the text and spell them out.Voila! North and South.In all fairness, and the reason I at least give 2 stars: there is some decent characterization here, particularly of the minor characters. There are some passages that make me think the author might have turned this into a decent social satire a la Jane Austen. And I’m willing to admit that the book might have been ahead of its time on some issues, like workers’ rights, although the bookjacket gave the impression there would be more of a social justice ethos, when it seemed to me just repackaged Dickens (who was its publisher) plus a strike. But was it ever a slog to get through! There just was not much tension in this book; even the romance wasn’t interesting until the last two pages, and by then it was too late.So: apologies to any who loved this book and were offended by my irreverent treatment, etc. As for me, I’ll just read more Jane Austen. Or better yet, Charlotte Brontë.

Dawn

I read this because I'd seen the BBC production, and wondered if Margaret Hale would be less silly in the book. North and South sounds like it should be about social and geographic divisions, but it's actually about finding balance amidst constant change. Although I found her character annoyingly reactive, the Miss Hale of the novel is decidedly less silly than she of the movie.I've read comparisons of Mr. Thornton to Jane Austen's Mr. Darcy, but I don't personally see much likeness--aside from a tendency to scowl. I actually preferred the BBC's Mr. Thornton, as he talked less and scowled more than Mr. Thornton in the book. Plus, he was played by Richard Armitage, which is never a bad thing.My favorite characters are Mrs. Thornton (Mr. Thornton's strict, severe mother), and Mr. Bell (Miss Hale's rich godfather). Mrs. Thornton has more sense and self-control than all the other characters in the book combined, and Mr. Bell is the only person with a sense of humor.Regardless of Miss Hale's silliness, I really enjoyed North and South. Miss Hale bounces back admirably from all the deaths and strife that the author inflicts on her. I would have appreciated more of Mr. Bell's levity, and a tad less angst from Mr. Thornton, but I was completely immersed in Miss Hale's world and find myself missing it now that I've finished the book.

Margaret

Elizabeth Gaskell was a friend of Charlotte Bronte and wrote at about the same time. The book was origonally published in parts in one of Dickons journals or magazines. After Charlotte Bronte read the first excerpt, she wasn't too keen on the story and thought it was just a discussion on religion. I don't remember what Bronte thought of the whole book, but the story received quite a bit of recognition when it came out.The storyline is more intense than Pride and Prejudice, but not as dark and twisted as Jane Eyre. However, the read itself is lighter and faster than a Jane Austen book.The best parts of the book for me were when the characters' reflections and thoughts were described in great detail (maybe a little overdone at times, though). I easily found myself sympathizing, laughing, and sighing with the characters.It's not as well written (in a literary sense) as Jane Eyre or Frankenstein, but it is a good story and has solid, relatable characters.

Carrie

Narrated by Clare WilleWhen North and South is mentioned these days, it is most likely in reference to the BBC miniseries based on the book, rather than the book itself. That’s not a bad thing, because the miniseries is superbly done. It takes a complicated story of love and life in industrial England in the mid-19th century, and makes it accessible to the modern viewer. But no matter how well done the TV adaptation is, the book is a gem worth pursuing for a patient reader, or better yet, a patient listener.Elizabeth Gaskell’s writing can be described as somewhat melodramatic, sentimental, and at times wordy, as was common for early Victorian writers. But the dated mode of writing doesn’t have to detract from the beauty of the writing or the enjoyment of the book. In fact, the style helps to immerse the reader in the time and place. North and South was, after all, written as a contemporary novel, and so shows authentic details, such as the language, dialects, and descriptions of daily life. The audiobook is read by Clare Wille, whose ability to manage not only the language of Gaskell, but also the many characters and dialects, is nothing short of amazing. Wille not only has to distinguish the male and female voice of the many characters, but she must voice the different manners of speaking between the social classes in the northern industrial town, as well as the differences in dialect between the characters from the south of England and those of the north. She does all this with skill and realism.The story is both simple and complicated. When Margaret Hale’s father, a vicar in the Church of England, decides he can no longer serve the church due to differences of faith, he moves his wife and daughter, Margaret, from the slow moving life of rural southern England to the industrial north, there to hopefully find employment as a tutor. Margaret, being raised on edge of gentility, finds the close association with manufacturers and “shop keepers” to be repugnant. She also finds the town of Milton to be dirty, noisy, and rough. There she meets both the successful manufacturers, such as Mr. Thornton who comes to be tutored by Mr. Hale, and the millworkers, such as Higgins and his two daughters, Bessie and Mary. Gaskell was heavily influenced by Austen’s Pride and Prejudice when writing the romance within North and South. The story of Margaret Hale and John Thornton parallels that of Elizabeth and Darcy on many levels. There is arrogance, ignorance, misunderstanding, and finally respect and understanding. Like Austen’s book, North and South shows the complicated lattice of social interactions and how class restrictions influence relationships and limit choices. Unlike Austen, however, Gaskell’s tale takes on the social problems of the day. The industrialization of England is elevating the middle class and straining the class structure of English society. Along with the changing social structure, Gaskell also explores the plight of the millworkers and struggles of the mill owners to stay competitive in a volatile market.Gaskell’s romantic notions go farther than getting the main couple together in the end. She also sets about getting another “couple” together-- the mill owner, Thornton and the union supporter, Higgins. As complicated as the misunderstandings are between Margaret and Thornton, they are nothing compared to the wall of prejudice and mistrust between the mill owners and their workers. Gaskell ideal was to see the two sides finally acknowledge their interdependence and work together to better the lives of the workers and the profits of the owners.It should be noted that religious faith plays a large part in the book. Several characters struggle with faith and belief is openly discussed in several conversations. Even so, this is in no way an “inspirational romance.” Gaskell instead explores the different approaches to faith at that time, using the experiences of each character’s life to illuminate their struggles. The part religion plays in the book is very much in keeping with its importance in the culture of the time, and is there for debate rather than for proselytizing. Clare Wille’s narration of Gaskell’s enduring story of love and struggles in industrial England is a rare treat. If you’ve enjoyed Pride and Prejudice and have a little patience with a writing style that is out of fashion, you will be rewarded with an awe-inspiring listening experience. Gaskell’s beautiful language and emotional story-telling coupled with Wille’s perfect narration is truly not to be missed.Reviewed for audiogals.net.

Christopher H.

I just finished reading North and South. I had immediately preceded my read of Gaskell's North and South with a reading of Charlotte Bronte's Shirley; as they both tend to address the issues of life and love in the north of England and the interactions and differences between the gentry, the manufacturers, and the working class. Both novels involve quite serious romantic themes between gentlewomen and generally self-made Middle-class men struggling to forge prosperous businesses in the age of industrialization. Shirley is set somewhat earlier; near the end of the Napoleonic wars and the Luddite Riots; while North and South is probably set some 20 years later.In comparing the two novels, I believe that Ms. Gaskell has painted the more complete portrait of the class and social issues of life in an industrial town in northern England. I think it is fascinating that Gaskell chose to use the eyes of the young, well-educated, Miss Margaret Hale to illuminate, for the reader, the initial strangeness of the fabric and peoples of industrial Milton; a landscape as foreign to Miss Hale as it is to the reader. Margaret, her mother and father, and their house-keeper relocate from a quiet little rural village in southern England to the smoky and bustling northern town of Milton; a veritable beehive of factories, business and commerce, and extreme conditions endured by the workers and families that man the factories. As one reads the first quarter of the book it is almost as though the reader must shift their viewpoint from that of 'living' technicolor of the pastoral south to an almost noir-ish and starkly black and white of the industrial brick and mortar north. It is almost jarring and unsettling; but I quite imagine that it was a quite realistic portrait of the differences between these two disparate regions.Another important reason that I wanted to read North and South is that I have heard that this novel is also Austenesque; and not having read the novel until now, I simply took it as a truism. In my opinion, I think nothing could be further from the truth. Let me explain my thinking.First, the overall tone of the novel is darker, by far, than anything Austen wrote, including Mansfield Park. North and South is realistically bleak and mainly addresses social conditions across all walks of life in northern England. Austen rarely delves into the social and cultural conditions associated with people running businesses or working for a living. Austen tends to focus on the inter-personal relationships between her characters; and, to my knowledge, does not spend many words on the backstory of any of the servants, laborers, or farmers that briefly appear in her novels. The Mrs and Miss Bates (Emma) and Fanny Price's family in Portsmouth (Mansfield Park) is about as lower class as Austen goes in her novels. In comparison, in North and South Ms. Gaskell brings us, front-and-center, into the gritty and very difficult lives of the Higgins family and the orphaned Boucher children. Elizabeth Gaskell spends a lot of time in the novel describing the horrific working and living conditions of the working class in Milton, and it is not a pretty sight. Austen never does this.Second, politics is another relatively taboo subject for Austen in her novels; but not so for Gaskell. Elizabeth Gaskell weighs in with a gusto in describing the politics of the time that lead to, in her opinion, many of these gross social injustices that she is writing about. She is concerned about working conditions in the factory (Bessy Higgins and the 'fluff' disease), the use of child labor, the role of unions, strikes, and strike-breaking, etc. The closest that Austen comes to addressing anything political are some very subtle and oblique references to the abomination of slavery (Sir Thomas Bertram's properties in Antigua in Mansfield Park), and the occasional, also oblique, references to the inability of women to obtain an education and employment and inheritance issues. Austen never dwells, in any detail, on these social injustices or inequities though; while Gaskell takes 'em on, one after the other.Finally, Gaskell's portrayal of the growing romance and relationship between Mr John Thornton and Margaret Hale is handled completely differently than any romantic entanglement described by Jane Austen. Gaskell's portrayal can be sentimental, maybe a little maudlin, sometimes raw, abrasive, and almost uncomfortable at times as Mr. Thornton and Margaret interact day-by-day in Milton and come to know each other. Austen's relationships, even those doomed with 'bad' men, are orchestrated more like a graceful and elegant pas-de-deux. Style, grace, manners, and gentility mean everything to Austen. While gentility and manners are also clearly important to Gaskell (and Margaret and John Thornton!), honesty and unrefined emotion are always apparent. Disgust and hurt are easily portrayed on Gaskell's character's faces, and sharp words can easily follow. In some respects, Gaskell's relationships of Margaret and Mr Lennox, and Margaret and Mr Thornton felt maybe more accurate and realistic; whilst Austen's feel more idealistic. One is not better than the other, they are just different approaches to describing the deep-felt emotions associated with courtship and establishing a romantic relationship between a woman and a man.In summation, the main observation I make in comparing North and South to the work of Austen is that Gaskell uses the relationship between Margaret and John Thornton to help guide the reader through an emotional and moral evaluation of the social and cultural issues that she is addressing in the novel. Austen, in contrast, uses her romantic relationships to address the natural and normal interpersonal communication issues of the people around her that she knew so much about. Austen's is a much more narrowly focused and personal novelistic point-of-view. Gaskell's point-of-view is much more Dickensian, broad and panoramic.In closing, I enjoyed reading North and South! It was wonderful companion to Charlotte Bronte's Shirley, and it was loads of fun to think through my own comparisons of Gaskell's romances to those of Jane Austen's. In my opinion, this novel is well worth reading and is an important brick in the wall of literary Victoriana.

FlibBityFLooB

As usual, it is my fault for not reading an annotated version of the novel, but instead electing to read the novel straight from the Gutenberg Project’s website. This is especially naughty of me because I actually have a paperback version of the book sitting on my shelf at home. Tsk tsk tsk! For those of you who haven't read this novel, I highly recommend the BBC production of North & South from around 2004-2005. It is one of my favorites, and it is the reason that I chose to read this novel :)The basic premise of the story? An exhibition of social class differences between factory owners and workers, as well as Northerners and Southerners in Victorian England. The story is excellent in that it shows how we are not all that different from one another and love can prevail all.Quirky language/passages that stood out to me in the novel:What is a mushroom rival? It makes me think of one of those goombas from Nintendo’s Super Mario: “[i:]f Margaret had not been very proud she might have almost felt jealous of the mushroom rival.” Shoppy people. Margaret says she does not like them. Do they work in shoppes? Apparently, they have a lot of pretense. Margaret also has a prejudice against butchers, bakers, and candlestick makers. Hehehe . I figure shoppy people are tradesmen, but I could be wrong… “I don't like shoppy people.” Very strange – when Miss Hale suffers her wound to the head during the mill mob, Mrs. Thorton bathes Hale’s head with eau de Cologne. I don’t know what kind of medicinal treatment that would support --- making her wound smell better? Perhaps there’s alcohol in the cologne to cleanse a wound? Not sure.My favorite passages:Dixon, the one servant of the Hale family, had some very interesting insight into her love for the mother/children in the Hale family, or more specifically, her lack of love for Mr. Hale: “'Bless her!' said Dixon. 'She's as sweet as a nut. There are three people I love: it's missus, Master Frederick, and her. Just them three. That's all. The rest be hanged, for I don't know what they're in the world for. Master was born, I suppose, for to marry missus. If I thought he loved her properly, I might get to love him in time.” Sexy Mr. Thorton finally assumes ownership of the revolting workers at the Mill: “But without waiting for her answer, he went slowly down the steps right into the middle of the crowd. 'Now kill me, if it is your brutal will. There is no woman to shield me here. You may beat me to death--you will nevermove me from what I have determined upon--not you!'” This is also the first time that Thorton realizes he is in love with Miss Hale. Yay!!!! :) “'Oh, my Margaret--my Margaret! no one can tell what you are to me! Dead--cold as you lie there, you are the only woman I ever loved! Oh, Margaret--Margaret!' Inarticulately as he spoke, kneeling by her, and rather moaning than saying the words, he started up, ashamed of himself, as his mother came in. She saw nothing, but her son a little paler, a little sterner than usual. Motherly insults to Margaret: “'Why, Margaret, you must not be hurt, but he was much prettier than you were. I remember, when I first saw you in Dixon's arms, I said, "Dear, what an ugly little thing!" And she said, "It's not every child that's like Master Fred, bless him!"” And finally, I loved the oxymoron in the ending when Margaret is being shown the rose by Mr. Thorton: “'You must give them to me,' she said, trying to take them out of his hand with gentle violence.”

Tea Jovanović

Prelepi klasik po kome je pre nekoliko godina snimljena nova serija koja je bozanstvena, onako kako samo Britanci umeju da urade serije i filmove po svojim klasicima... Ova autorka je kod nas uglavnom ignorisana od izdavaca ... Ali ko zna... mozda se i to promeni jednog dana... cuda su moguca... :)

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