Querelle of Brest (Faber Fiction Classics)

ISBN: 0571203671
ISBN 13: 9780571203673
By: Jean Genet G. Streatham

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About this book

Querelle of Brest is regarded by many critics as Jean Genet's highest achievement in the novel- certainly one of the landmarks of postwar French literature. The story of a dangerous man seduced by danger, it deals in a startling way with the Dostoevskian theme of murder as an act of total liberation, and as a pact demanding an answering sacrifice.Querelle is a young sailor at large in the port of Brest. His abrupt senior officer, Lt. Seblon, records in an elegant diary his longing for the young man. The policeman Mario, who frames his mates for stealing from the Monoprix, covets him. The brothel keeper's husband, feels entitled to possess him. The murderer in hiding, whom he nourishes, embraces him. Even the madam herself, despite her dispproval of his kind, becomes Querelle's mistress. 'His elaborate constructed novel about a sailor in Brest who murders and allows representatives of authority, like policemen and ponces, to act out their sexual fantasies on him is continuously vivid and varied...To ignore it would be a kind of treason to culture one inhabits' PUNCH 'In spite of the quality of the rapaciousness and lust-the corruption by both the establishment and the outsider, the characters in Genet's books all share a burning, tempestuous passion to live. For them, to do good or evil is part of the human condition-and to sin is better than to do nothing, because it means to exist. On the final count, Querelle of Brest stands for a great cry of affirmation on the side of life' THE SPECTATOR

Reader's Thoughts

Ser

I had been meaning to read this for years, especially after watching Fassbinder's 1982 film adaptation, but I somehow never got to it. Matthew McConaughey's character in the amazing Paperboy made me remember the book again.The story might be of interest only from a historic point of view more than anything else, as it's really daring for when it was written and it deals really blatantly with the themes of sex and violence. I found the writing rather messy, but there are passages that truly are magic. For me the most captivating thing is Querelle's psychology and how he approaches his relationships with other men. I felt the murdering instincts and general criminal activities were far less interesting and at points my mind actually drifted away.I am happy I've finally read it, but I don't think I'll read it again any time soon. It made me want to watch the film again, though.

Justin

"The movement arched his entire body and made his basket bulge under the cloth of his trousers. He had at that moment, despite his being cloistered, . . . the nobility of an animal which carries its whole load between its legs."

Morgan Gallegos

This book is beautifully written but is really really dense. It can be hard to keep up in the beginning but the story is fascinating. My only wish is that the narrative didn't jump around so much. The story lines become very confused which works well for the overall story but can be very difficult to read.

Jeff

Now that's what I'm talkin' about - page after page of brooding homoeroticism. Find yourself transported into the schemes, double-crosses, and deepest thoughts of the men in a French port city. And there's mansex, but it's not pansy sex, it's men performing sex acts with men, perfectly masculine stuff.A straight guy reading this is like a straight guy wearing pink - some people may think this means you're gay, but smarter people know it's really a validation of your confidence in your identity.

Ismael Schonhorst

A gay (literal and metaphorical sense) life prose-poetry: meaning, lessons and reflections about being.

tENTATIVELY, cONVENIENCE

Well.. After 33 yrs or so of reading Genet.. I reckon he just doesn't do it for me anymore. The things that I probably found energizing when I 1st started reading his bks, the criminal philosophizing, is mostly tedious to me now. &.. the cocks.. oh am I sick of the cocks.. Do we really exist in a society where people can think of little else other than cock size? How boring. Big cocks & little minds. I saw the Fassbinder film based on this bk when it came out, around 1982. Id' already seen other Fassbinder films. I was interested in him as a major German filmmaker. I didn't like his "Querelle" at all. I remember it as being highly stylized in a theatrical way that was a total turn-off for my more experimental tastes. In fact, truth be told, I've never liked Fassbinder much ANYWAY. Too depressing - even his comedies are just grim reminders of how base & repulsive most people are to me. At 1st, when I started reading "Querelle of Brest", I was reminded, once again, of what a WRITER Genet is, of how carefully he puts his words together, of how 'poetically' (as so many others wd have it) he tells his tale of this murderous sailor. Above all, over & above being gay, over & above being a criminal, Genet was a WRITER. It struck me that I've never run across Genet being referred to as a "crime fiction writer". He's too 'flowery', too philosophical. But, in a sense, he cd be compared to Patricia Highsmith. Querelle cd be compared to her character Mr. Ripley. Both Genet & Highsmith give more psychology than most. When I started reading "Querelle.." I thought I was finishing reading the last of Genet, the one last bk of his I hadn't read - getting closure. Then I saw that he has a play I haven't read: "Splendid's". GROAN. I'm somewhat of an obssessive-compulsive, a completist. After reading "Querelle" will I actually read another bk by Genet? Not anytime soon.. In the end I'd say "Querelle.." was 'interesting', well-written.. but I probably didn't really like it. I found it so tedious so quickly that I kept putting off reading it but, OC that I am, I forced myself to read the whole thing. But, as w/ my reactions to Fassbinder's films, I just found myself sickened by the characters & not really that impressed by Genet's religious hard-on for this form of male 'culture'. I'm the enemy of the mindless mental traps that these characters wallow in. After I finished the bk, I watched the Fassbinder film again to cap off the experience. I think I hated it even more this time than I did when I 1st saw it. As I recall, "Querelle" was Fassbinder's last film. It was different from the earlier ones - more theatrical, less 'realistic': theatrical lighting, melodramatic music, narration, intertitles, obvious sets instead of locations, 'unrealistic' intellectual monologues in the mouths of assholes - that sort of thing. &, yet, I understood in 1982, & I still understand now, Fassbinder's treatment: it's (mostly) faithful to the bk, it's faithful to what sets Genet apart from most writers who might approach his subjects. Still, I hated it. It was so tedious, I kept being tempted to fast-forward thru it. I stopped it halfway thru & took a short nap. It was practically unbearable.. but I knew I'd be writing this & wanted the film fresh in my mind. Fassbinder did change a few parts. He has Querelle dress Gil as Querrelle's brother Robert when he sends him out to rob Lieutenant Seblon. That was an interesting touch, it tied the plot even tighter. I wonder what Genet thought about that? He was still alive when the film came out.

Mikael Kuoppala

An intensely and beautifully erotic and poetically written novel that has its roots in existentialism.

A

1 star for being a disastrous editorial effort + 5 stars for its inimitably sexy style and transgressive genius = 3-star average.As with all Genet, I mostly had no idea what was going on (or why), yet I still was fascinated, aroused, and disturbed. Until Querelle, I had no idea a book could be both unreadable and captivating at the same time. Having now read the book, I can say that the deliciously surreal Fassbinder film of the same name) is unquestionably THE best, most "faithful" (and hottest) book-to-movie adaptation in the history of cinema.

Sue Tincher

Gay sex among the French sailors. Lusty, corrupt police. Drugs. Murder. Betrayal. Lots of muscular young bodies. Not really my thing...

Dominique Pierre Batiste

"Se brester, to brace oneself. Derives, no doubt, from bretteur, fighter: and so, relates to se quereller, to pick a fight"

Emily

I don't give out 5 stars lightly.the English translation of Querelle (originally French) is easily one of the best translations I've ever read. The lyrical beauty of the work remains wonderfully in tact. Querelle is super thick, rich, compelling, and dark. The filthy world of sailors and brothels lends itself to one of the queerest (here i meant "strangest" until I realized that it fully embodies both meanings of the word) things I've ever read. It's difficult, but so worth getting through. I feel bad on my 5 star ratings because I feel that nothing I could ever say would portend what lies between the covers of these books. But as of yet, its in the best 10 books I've ever had the pleasure of reading.

Mike

What can one say of Genet? He was one of the greatest writers of the 20th century, without a doubt, and possibly the greatest writer working in the French language since Gide to address issues of male sexuality in an unconventional, discursive, manner. However, a lot of his fiction to me is rather depressing—droll even in places—and this book was no different, though it did offer more realism and tangible detail than some of his other works. The port city of Brest is one of the more-gritty cities of France, a place always associated mainly with two things: military might (as a naval base) and crime. Genet well understands this and paints the city as the central character of the novel. With the city taking the lead, everyone else brings up the proverbial rear: sailors, naval officers, madames, et cetera. Petty crime and crime grand, it's all here. I'd certainly recommend this book to anyone interested in Genet or 20th century French literature, but I will admit it left me wanting in places. To write a literary whodunit or fiction that desires for nothing more than to be true crime, I would look to Hawksmoor, the 1985 novel by the British writer Peter Ackroyd. While we may not want Genet to be P.D. James, at times the crime aspects could have been played for more interest than they were. Or, perhaps it's just my own personal taste: I will say it's a powerful work and lacks none of all that makes Genet great, I just couldn't get into it as I've always desired to get into Genet's work.If you can read French, do read it in the French. Also, I expect if I read it over again, it will grow on me. There's a lot that's wonderful about this book but it's also trucated to me in places, and almost seems rushed sometimes. Still, it's Genet and could be no other.

Anu

I must admit that the plot was really mixed, but maybe I just should consider it as Genet's artistic style. The book is written so wonderfully that I can forgive the confusion caused by the plot. I loved the language and the way Genet describes his characters and their thoughts. Not to mention that Querelle himself is quite perfect, being sailor and a murderer and all.One of the best GLBT-books that I've read.

robert

Well, it is full of buggery, but it's so much more. And not just the notion that a body is nothing but scaffolding for a man's balls.

Syd

genet pushes boundaries in this novel as necessity and convention clash. the raw, bleeding tension and blatant disregard for the soft and fuzzy thrust deep inside me and kick started a hunger for faceless encounters in dark alleys.

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