Salmon of Doubt

ISBN: 1402540434
ISBN 13: 9781402540431
By: Douglas Adams

Check Price Now

Genres

Currently Reading Fantasy Favorites Fiction Humor Humour Non Fiction Sci Fi Science Fiction To Read

About this book

"Łosoś zwątpienia" składa się z dziesięciu rozdziałów powieści, nad którą Douglas Adams pracował w chwili śmierci w maju 2001 roku, dwóch opowiadań oraz zadziwiającego zbioru przejawów jego twórczości, odzyskanych z twardego dysku jego ulubionego macintosha: od niezwykle "poważnego" traktatu poświęconego niestosowności noszenia krótkich spodni, do wykładów odzwierciedlających wyjątkowe zrozumienie przez Adamsa światów naturalnego, technologicznego i filozoficznego. W tomie znajdziemy także artykuły na tak różne tematy, jak religia, przetworniki prądu, które powodują całkowity bałagan w dziedzinie komputerów, litera Y czy miłosna afera z dwiema sukami w Nowym Meksyku.Zarówno dla miłośników Douglasa Adamsa, jak i czytelników, którzy go jeszcze nie znają, "Łosoś zwątpienia" jest niepowtarzalnym szwedzkim stołem, pełnym wariactw, produktów cywilizacyjnych i przedziwnych dzieł stworzonych przez życie, wszechświat i całą resztę.

Reader's Thoughts

Adam Heine

So, this is not my kind of book. The first two-thirds are basically a collection of blog posts, and well...there's a reason I don't buy blog post collection books. This was a birthday present :-) And the last third is a wonderfully written, but ultimately unfinished portion of a Dirk Gently novel which honestly makes me sad because now I'm left hanging. Forever.Adams' writing is hilarious, always. The fiction snippets, in particular, were everything I miss about him, but his "posts" were fun to read, too. The book just didn't stick with me because it's not the kind of blog I would have read: dated technology posts (it's not his fault they're dated, of course) and fingers-in-the-ears atheism. Douglas Adams seems like he was an awesome individual, and I would love to have met him, but clearly there are certain topics he and I would've had to avoid talking about, or else spent a couple of days talking about at great length :-)

Glenn

While many of the pieces included in this collection were, a) entertaining, b) somewhat informative, c) diverse, and d) well written peeks into the beliefs and personality of the author, the overall effect was also, e) incomplete. Of course that's to be understood, as it IS a posthumous gathering of magazine articles, interviews, and an unfinished 'Dirk Gently' story. One does wonder, however, if it was really necessary to publish "The Salmon of Doubt". Being as unfinished and maybe haphazardly thrown together as it sort of appears, do you think Mr. Adams himself would really have wanted to attach his name to this? For all the good intentions involved, and the glorious little bits of wisdom and humor contained therein, "Salmon" still feels more like a tease than a satisfying conclusion. It is understandable that fans of Douglas Adams may hunger for any scrap they haven't yet read by the man before his unexpected departure (Mr. Adams died suddenly, of a heart attack, in 2001), but overall, in my opinion, the assembly of the contents here feels rushed, desperately collected and lashed together, just so readers could feel as if it were that proper last goodbye. Is it? In my opinion, no. It is perhaps a sincere tribute put together by friends and admirers, but no, not a fitting conclusion.

Melissa Diaz

Published upon his death The Salmon of Doubt is Douglas Adams' final work. It is composed of various interviews, speeches, observations, short stories and the beginning of a new Dirk Gently novel. It is a combination of technology, science, fiction and humor. (It is also the title I assumed would be my fiftieth.) I liked the book, but think I would have liked it more had I heeded the advice on the back cover and not read it straight through. There's not enough continuity to make it that kind of book. (Apparently the fact that it's a compilation of items rather than a story was not a big enough clue for me.)Favorite Quotes:"I only knew that the Beatles were the most exciting thing in the universe. It wasn't always an easy view to live with. First you had to fight the Stones fans, which was tricky because they fought dirty and had their knuckles nearer to the ground.""Obviously the Sub Bug wins some points for being portable up to a point. You can take it on a plane, which you wouldn't do with a manta ray, or at least not with a manta ray you liked, and I think that we probably like all manta rays on principle really, don't we?""He moved his horse slowly forward and surveyed the small group of peasant huts that stood huddled together in the centre of the clearing, trying very hard at short notice to look deserted.""There is a particular disdain with which Siamese cats regard you. Anyone who has accidentally walked in on the Queen cleaning her teeth will be familiar with this feeling."Overall Opinion:Unless you're an Adams' fanatic and looking to read everything he ever wrote on any subject then take it slowly. Read something else at the same time and you'll enjoy The Salmon of Doubt more than I did.Rating:6

stormhawk

A book by Douglas Adams. Well, it's not actually by him, except in the sense that they were words that he wrote, mostly in that order. But he was dead when it was published. Collection of some previously published essays and the fragments of his final novel, which was harvested in bits from filing cabinets and from the hard drive of his computer, including some bits that weren't meant to be seen by the general public, as they were deleted, but someone foolhardily recovered the bits and slapped them back together to make money. Adams died so young that my sense of what is right in the world insists that I cling to a conspiratoratical hope that he was a very shy and private man thrust into too many spotlights because of his fame and having failed at politely asking people to just go away and leave him alone, he had to resort to publishing notices of his death so that he could quietly live on the considerable savings from his books.Come on, haven't you read Christopher Moore and wondered about the possibility?

Eric Hendrixson

Okay, the three star rating requires an explanation. The idea behind this book was to publish an unfinished novel and a number of Adams' uncollected writings in a collection for the fans. This is not a book for casual readers of Adams but for people who have read everything Adams wrote and want more. It was exactly what I thought I was buying, so why the mediocre rating?There was nothing wrong with the writing. It's Douglas Adams, so the writing was good. My issue was with the collection and editing. There are short stories included in the collection that have already been published elsewhere. I know I read "Young Zaphod Plays it Safe" in the leatherbound "More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy." Another problem is the republished interviews in which Adams gives extremely consistent answers to similar questions. I don't fault Adams for this. It makes him very credible, but it makes the book repetitive. This repetition makes it a book useful only to Adams completists. However, I guess this is exactly the audience for whom the book was compiled. Had someone told me this beforehand, I still would have picked up a copy of the book.

Tracie

I enjoyed the forwards and short stories that were in this book. But I was also saddened by the ending when I could no longer put the fact that Douglas Adams death was not just a fictitous vicious rumor but the cold truth. After reading so many of his wonderful creations I feel as though I have lost a close friend. I am saddened by the fact that his words, the ones that don't grace pulped pages, are no longer coming. The world was a better place with Douglas Adams in it.

Aaron

I loved this. Not all of it, but the parts at the beginning. This is not a book, or rather, it is not a coherent story. Douglas Adams was working towards a book called the Salmon of Doubt when he died. This is a collection of writing, which includes many of the things he had written which may, or may not have ended up on his book. There are also many writings by other people, people who know Douglas Adams. I laughed and I cried many times as I listened to this. This book will do little or nothing for someone who has little or no experience with Douglas Adams. If you want to experience what I have experienced, and get the full effect of this book, you must first listen to the BBC radio recordings of the Hitchhiker's Guide series. Then I'd recommend watching the BBC TV show, then I would read or listen to the novels, and finally, watch the movie. If I am not mistaken, this is the order in which he wrote them, although I am not convinced he actually had much to do with the TV show. There are also the Dirk Gently books, which you can read or listen to at any point, as long as they are after the radio broadcasts and before this book. We lost a genius when we lost Douglas Adams. If you are a friend of mine, I am sure you've had some experience of Mr. Adams, but perhaps you haven't had the full experience. I highly recommend it.

Karen Terrell

Ohmygosh. I found myself grieving at the end of this book - all teary-eyed and sniffling - it felt like I was saying a final good bye to a dear friend. This was Adams's last book - compiled and arranged in the year after his death by his friends and editors. Coming to the end of Salmon of Doubt, and realizing there'd be no more words written by Adams, was really hard for me. I loved this book. The humor, the whimsy, Adams's unique take on the world - it was all there. I wish I'd gotten to know his writing while he was here with us - and I'm so sorry he no longer is.

Maggard

This makes a good case for NOT publishing everything found around the house after an otherwise-brilliant author kicks the bucket.

Jon

Readers beware: The Salmon of Doubt is not a single novel, but rather a collection of goods pulled from Adams' computer after his death--including a draft of the first few chapters of his next Dirk Gently story (also titled The Salmon of Doubt, thus the larger part of this collection's title). Also enclosed in this volume are a series of short stories, essays, travelogues, and other random snippets, some of which date back over a decade, and most of which have little to do with the next entry, except they were all written by Adams.How, then, to review this book? How does one go about commenting on a collection of miscellanea the author never intended to exist in single-volume form? How does one offer criticism on a draft of an unfinished novel? Indeed, how does one offer any insight into a bricolage of material that, pessimistically, smacks of the publishing industry's frantic attempts to make one last posthumous dollar off of a popular writer?I answer through a personal narrative. Any review ever published is, of course, subjective. This one is more so than even most. There's your grain of salt.My wife bought me this book for my birthday, and I took it with me when I flew home (alone; my wife wasn't able to accompany me) the next week to visit my parents. I read the entire book in one day as I shuffled between airplanes and ticket counters, fast-food stands and uncomfortable plastic seats. Much of what appeared in Salmon... was completely new to me, as I'd somehow never read Adams' shorter works--only his novels. But in short, I was both entranced and maddened: the former at the brilliant intelligence and humor that marble-streaked its way through the pages; the latter at the frustratingly incomplete Dirk Gently novel (imagine if Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had only written the first half of "The Hound of the Baskervilles" before suddenly perishing, or if Shakespeare had never completed "Romeo and Juliet"). I saw in Salmon... sides of Adams both familiar to me, as in his intelligent satire, and unfamiliar, as in the extemporaneous and atheistic speech he delivered at Cambridge, sections of which forced me to close the cover temporarily while I pondered my own thoughts about the nature of God. Most importantly, through all of these scattered scribblings I saw the inner workings of a man who truly, admirably loved life. And as I turned the last page and stared helplessly at the blank sheet before me, and realized that I had just read the last "book" Adams would ever "publish," I was overcome with a sadness so deep and painful that I've never yet been able to even pull Salmon... off of the shelf again, much less read it.Douglas Adams never knew I existed: we never met, exchanged correspondence, or even caught a glimpse of one another in a crowded airport. Yet I consider this man one of my dearest mentors, a man whose writing has shaped the last fifteen years of my life in areas too varied and extensive to number. How then to review a book like this? Simply put, I can't. I'm too close. Even now, five years after the only time I managed to read Salmon..., and six years after Adams' death, I'm too close.Why, then, do I give this book five stars?How could I not?

ringoallavaniglia

Potrei scrivere un fiume di parole su quanto apprezzi l'Adams scrittore e l'uomo, quanto condivida le sue idee (a parte sulla Apple, ma se vedesse cosa è diventata credo si schiferebbe anche lui)e su quanto la sua scomparsa mi rattristi molto più di quanto sarebbe lecito aspettarsi. Ma non è il caso.Questo libro raccoglie tante interviste, aneddoti ed idee che raccontano molto su chi era Adams; quindi se avete apprezzato i suoi libri e desiderate scoprire qualcosa su di lui è la lettura giusta.Inoltre contiene la prima bozza incompiuta del nuovo romanzo di Dirk Gently.. e accidenti non saprò mai che cavolo doveva combinare con quel rinoceronte!

Mpr

This work is unpolished, unfinished, and it's totally obvious. It cuts off as abruptly as the final piece of Bach (BWV 1080), leaving a vague disappointment and a void that won't ever be filled. I never met Douglas Adams, and I'll never have a chance to, but perhaps one day I'll visit his grave.Douglas Adams was unique in his ability for existential satire. From his portrayal of transgalactic airports to the way Norse gods would act in modern London, all his work shows a delightful talent for combining the surreal and the mundane. He mixes them, like a fancy drink, garnishes it, and offers you one of the most pleasingly different word cocktails that you'll ever taste.The Salmon of Doubt didn't contain this in the same density as his other novels, and perhaps if I were reading it without the necessary context of his writings I would be left confused and underwhelmed. But knowing Adams' oeuvre makes it almost-make-sense, in the way the first cut-off half of an absurdly complicated mystery novel might. I'm rating this five stars regardless of the unpolished writing because of the emotions it instills in me- the guaranteed sadness, the sense that I lost someone important to me before I'd ever even met him.

Nick Fagerlund

A kind of poor book which just happens to be filled with awesome. I'd really like a well-organized and indexed collection of all of Douglas Adams' short writings. Round up all the columns and editorials he wrote, the text he did for his websites, everything, and get it all tied up with a bow and some context. Salmon isn't that collection; the writings are just tossed into poorly-defined buckets with no real TOC to speak of (and let us not speak of indexes), and there's no real way to tell what's missing or what's even important. There's some occasional interesting serendipity to be had, but eh.On the other hand, it's Douglas Adams, bringer of joy and wry, good-natured English despair, and even inferior collections of his work are crucial.

Katherine Furman

If you love Douglas Adams this book is an absolute must read. It's got some great incite into the man who could make a pot of petunias think to itself, 'Not again.' A large part of my enjoyment was finding out about Adams as a person, and in turn finding out that I've got some stuff in common with him. I mean sure I haven't ridden a stingray like he has or written the funniest books of all time and granted I'm not British, BUT we do make our tea the same way, we're both have the same religious beliefs in our complete lack of having them (did you know atheists have conventions? I didn't), and, well I can't think of another one right now, but we're like peas in a pod. Trust me.Plus he recommends some great authors and tells some hysterical true stories. Damn it, I miss him. As much as you can miss someone you never met anyway, which believe me is a LOT.

Nathaniel Chew

tragically interrupted :'(

Share your thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *