Salmon of Doubt

ISBN: 1402540434
ISBN 13: 9781402540431
By: Douglas Adams

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About this book

"Łosoś zwątpienia" składa się z dziesięciu rozdziałów powieści, nad którą Douglas Adams pracował w chwili śmierci w maju 2001 roku, dwóch opowiadań oraz zadziwiającego zbioru przejawów jego twórczości, odzyskanych z twardego dysku jego ulubionego macintosha: od niezwykle "poważnego" traktatu poświęconego niestosowności noszenia krótkich spodni, do wykładów odzwierciedlających wyjątkowe zrozumienie przez Adamsa światów naturalnego, technologicznego i filozoficznego. W tomie znajdziemy także artykuły na tak różne tematy, jak religia, przetworniki prądu, które powodują całkowity bałagan w dziedzinie komputerów, litera Y czy miłosna afera z dwiema sukami w Nowym Meksyku.Zarówno dla miłośników Douglasa Adamsa, jak i czytelników, którzy go jeszcze nie znają, "Łosoś zwątpienia" jest niepowtarzalnym szwedzkim stołem, pełnym wariactw, produktów cywilizacyjnych i przedziwnych dzieł stworzonych przez życie, wszechświat i całą resztę.

Reader's Thoughts

Aaron

I loved this. Not all of it, but the parts at the beginning. This is not a book, or rather, it is not a coherent story. Douglas Adams was working towards a book called the Salmon of Doubt when he died. This is a collection of writing, which includes many of the things he had written which may, or may not have ended up on his book. There are also many writings by other people, people who know Douglas Adams. I laughed and I cried many times as I listened to this. This book will do little or nothing for someone who has little or no experience with Douglas Adams. If you want to experience what I have experienced, and get the full effect of this book, you must first listen to the BBC radio recordings of the Hitchhiker's Guide series. Then I'd recommend watching the BBC TV show, then I would read or listen to the novels, and finally, watch the movie. If I am not mistaken, this is the order in which he wrote them, although I am not convinced he actually had much to do with the TV show. There are also the Dirk Gently books, which you can read or listen to at any point, as long as they are after the radio broadcasts and before this book. We lost a genius when we lost Douglas Adams. If you are a friend of mine, I am sure you've had some experience of Mr. Adams, but perhaps you haven't had the full experience. I highly recommend it.

Michael Sentman

It is unfortunate that there are not more books by Douglas Adams. I would love to be able to read more novels, to be surrounded by his humor, intelligence, and imagination but his works are more spread out between different medias than just books. This book is a collection of mostly random letters, anecdotes, and the beginning of an unfinished novel put together posthumously. Some of the stories are very interesting, lending a perspective into Douglas' life and interests and closes it with a reminder of how brilliant his writing was, even when it was unfinished. The book is quick to read as none of the individual works that comprise this collection are very long and it has its insights and wisdom like his other works. While the book is pervaded by Adam's unmatched wit and humor, finishing the novel left me sad, but only because I know that there is no more to be read.

Traummachine

3.5 stars:This posthumous release was a fun hodgepodge of Adams material. A lot of it is non-fiction: articles and essays about his work, his love of technology and gadgets, his nose, and more. If I remember right, there are only 2 fiction pieces included: a version of the short "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe" and his incomplete novel The Salmon of Doubt."Young Zaphod Plays It Safe" has been included in several Hitchhiker's collections, but apparently the version here is more explicit about who Adams means at the end. The Salmon of Doubt is obviously a work in progress but still fun and still obviously Adams. He said it felt more like a Hitchhiker story to him and that he planned to rewrite it as one, but I really enjoyed it as a Dirk Gently story too. Like the rest of this collection, the version here is a mishmash.The non-fiction was interesting and fun too. Every word is definitely Adams, even when he's talking about decisions Apple made that he's unhappy with, and personally I enjoyed every minute of it. I take that back, the Editor's Note, Prologue, and Forward were by other folks, but I think the very fact that there was an Editor's Note as well as a Prologue as well as a Forward felt very appropriate for Douglas Adams.He'll definitely be missed.

stormhawk

A book by Douglas Adams. Well, it's not actually by him, except in the sense that they were words that he wrote, mostly in that order. But he was dead when it was published. Collection of some previously published essays and the fragments of his final novel, which was harvested in bits from filing cabinets and from the hard drive of his computer, including some bits that weren't meant to be seen by the general public, as they were deleted, but someone foolhardily recovered the bits and slapped them back together to make money. Adams died so young that my sense of what is right in the world insists that I cling to a conspiratoratical hope that he was a very shy and private man thrust into too many spotlights because of his fame and having failed at politely asking people to just go away and leave him alone, he had to resort to publishing notices of his death so that he could quietly live on the considerable savings from his books.Come on, haven't you read Christopher Moore and wondered about the possibility?

Glenn

While many of the pieces included in this collection were, a) entertaining, b) somewhat informative, c) diverse, and d) well written peeks into the beliefs and personality of the author, the overall effect was also, e) incomplete. Of course that's to be understood, as it IS a posthumous gathering of magazine articles, interviews, and an unfinished 'Dirk Gently' story. One does wonder, however, if it was really necessary to publish "The Salmon of Doubt". Being as unfinished and maybe haphazardly thrown together as it sort of appears, do you think Mr. Adams himself would really have wanted to attach his name to this? For all the good intentions involved, and the glorious little bits of wisdom and humor contained therein, "Salmon" still feels more like a tease than a satisfying conclusion. It is understandable that fans of Douglas Adams may hunger for any scrap they haven't yet read by the man before his unexpected departure (Mr. Adams died suddenly, of a heart attack, in 2001), but overall, in my opinion, the assembly of the contents here feels rushed, desperately collected and lashed together, just so readers could feel as if it were that proper last goodbye. Is it? In my opinion, no. It is perhaps a sincere tribute put together by friends and admirers, but no, not a fitting conclusion.

Nick Fagerlund

A kind of poor book which just happens to be filled with awesome. I'd really like a well-organized and indexed collection of all of Douglas Adams' short writings. Round up all the columns and editorials he wrote, the text he did for his websites, everything, and get it all tied up with a bow and some context. Salmon isn't that collection; the writings are just tossed into poorly-defined buckets with no real TOC to speak of (and let us not speak of indexes), and there's no real way to tell what's missing or what's even important. There's some occasional interesting serendipity to be had, but eh.On the other hand, it's Douglas Adams, bringer of joy and wry, good-natured English despair, and even inferior collections of his work are crucial.

Melissa Diaz

Published upon his death The Salmon of Doubt is Douglas Adams' final work. It is composed of various interviews, speeches, observations, short stories and the beginning of a new Dirk Gently novel. It is a combination of technology, science, fiction and humor. (It is also the title I assumed would be my fiftieth.) I liked the book, but think I would have liked it more had I heeded the advice on the back cover and not read it straight through. There's not enough continuity to make it that kind of book. (Apparently the fact that it's a compilation of items rather than a story was not a big enough clue for me.)Favorite Quotes:"I only knew that the Beatles were the most exciting thing in the universe. It wasn't always an easy view to live with. First you had to fight the Stones fans, which was tricky because they fought dirty and had their knuckles nearer to the ground.""Obviously the Sub Bug wins some points for being portable up to a point. You can take it on a plane, which you wouldn't do with a manta ray, or at least not with a manta ray you liked, and I think that we probably like all manta rays on principle really, don't we?""He moved his horse slowly forward and surveyed the small group of peasant huts that stood huddled together in the centre of the clearing, trying very hard at short notice to look deserted.""There is a particular disdain with which Siamese cats regard you. Anyone who has accidentally walked in on the Queen cleaning her teeth will be familiar with this feeling."Overall Opinion:Unless you're an Adams' fanatic and looking to read everything he ever wrote on any subject then take it slowly. Read something else at the same time and you'll enjoy The Salmon of Doubt more than I did.Rating:6

Maggard

This makes a good case for NOT publishing everything found around the house after an otherwise-brilliant author kicks the bucket.

Johnny

In early 1998 (or was it ‘97?), I experienced one of the most heady experiences of my life. A literary idol approached me at a conference we were attending in France (it was in Cannes, but it was a media festival rather than the more famous annual event), invited me to join him at dinner and debate the existence of God. Douglas Adams, self-proclaimed radical atheist, wanted to consider God’s existence (or lack thereof) with me. As a minister, I’d like to write myself in as the hero and claim that I at least put a dent in the famous atheist’s armor. We had a fascinating conversation and I’d like to think that I pushed him into rethinking his position, but that’s not very realistic. Hang on! This does relate to this collection of Adams’ writing in his last years, especially those reprinted in The Salmon of Doubt.In our discussion, I pulled out the well-worn rubber duck of apologetics. I told him that he was dishonest in calling himself an atheist instead of an agnostic. I didn’t realize that this was the most offensive opening I could try. I hadn’t read his interview with American Atheists where he asserted that Agnostic did not adequately express his position because he was “convinced that there is no God.” (p. 96) But I blundered into the conversation with my classic approach that it is intellectual arrogance to claim to “know” that there is no God by appealing to an illustration in one of Rudy Rucker’s books on multidimensionality. This took my literary hero off guard because “multidimensionality” was a great fascination for him. I told him that certainty of the non-existence of God might well be trying to decide a multidimensional issue via the limited dimensions we have discovered in our empirical science. Then, I conceded that being “convinced” was different than “knowing,” but that it wasn’t objectively any better than a person of faith being “convinced.” I scored the opening round a stand-off. I’m not sure what Adams would have scored it. He must have been somewhat satisfied because he shifted gears.He told me that there was no rational need for the existence of God. This, of course, is a different question. Unlike my typical sermon, I opted to walk the tightrope of suggested that God is a useful concept—EVEN (don’t be horrified at my speculation, true believers) if a personal God didn’t exist. I told him that I personally believe in a personal God, but for purposes of discussion, we should consider whether there really was no rational need for the existence of God. I asserted that, contrary to Adams’ hero Richard Dawkins for whom I expressed admiration for his science and reservation for his assertions which went beyond the acceptable evidence, the idea of God was more helpful than harmful.Adams was skeptical (duh!) and attempted two analogies which I found interesting. He pulled some British currency out of his wallet and suggested that burning it wouldn’t warm you, eating it wouldn’t feed you, and wearing it wouldn’t cover you, but that it had purchasing power because the state stood behind it. But, he suggested that you need the assurance that the state exists in order for the currency to have any effect whatsoever. I countered (maybe a feeble parry at best) that, for the bulk of the British population, they had no idea of the nature of money supply, national deficit, budget viability, and governmental oversight of that currency but had an essential faith in the government. One doesn’t have to have all of the economics behind the currency explained satisfactorily in order to use the money. In the same way, one doesn’t have to understand everything about God in order to benefit from the idea of God. Therefore, there may well be a rational need for God. Before I explain the next analogy, imagine my amazement to see the late 1998 speech from Adams that was reprinted in The Salmon of Doubt: “Money is a completely fictitious entity, but it’s very powerful in our world; we all have wallets, which have got notes in them, but what can these notes do? You can’t breed them, you can’t stir-fry them, you can’t live in them, there’s absolutely nothing you can do with them, other than exchange them with each other—and as soon as we exchange them with each other, all sorts of powerful things happen, because it’s a fiction that we’ve all subscribed to. …if the money vanished, the entire cooperative structure that we have would implode.” (p. 140) Did our discussion bear fruit? Adams didn’t change his mind about the existence of God. He merely recognized the utility of the concept of God. Egotistically, I had thought to convince him one step at a time, but perhaps, I merely pushed him to fortify and develop his philosophical position to allow for a utilitarian (he called it “artificial”) God. The conversation was still stimulating, especially so when Adams began to expound about Feng Shui. Now, maybe I wasn’t listening, but I thought he was expressing skepticism about Feng Shui, so I said that it wouldn’t really make any different that he and I don’t believe that dragons exist, but that the concept of the dragon may help people design more comfortable and functional living spaces even if no dragon ever sets foot in the dwelling (and presumably they would not). Therefore, I suggested that even if I was wrong about the personal God whom I serve, my life may be better and more meaningful as a result of my conceptual idea of God’s involvement in my life. Now, admittedly, Adams’ hero of evolutionary arrogance (Richard Dawkins) wouldn’t concede this as said individual perceives the very concept to be harmful due to the fundamentalist extremes which have wreaked havoc in human history, but it seemed like the approach caused Adams to pause. Again, that could be arrogance on my part. I WISH I had impacted Adams and this could merely be wish-fulfillment. However, I was delighted to read on p. 146: “You figure out how the dragon’s going to be happy here, and lo, and behold, you’ve suddenly got a place that makes sense for other organic creatures, such as ourselves, to live in.” Do I think I won a debate with this man who was, in so many ways, my intellectual superior? Naaah! I just like to think that our conversation pushed him in a direction he was already considering. Do I wish I could have convinced him of the existence of a personal God who cared about Him and wanted to be involved in his life and life’s work? Absolutely! Do I still admire him as a person and his creative output? Absolutely!There were a few other lines that I really enjoyed in this book of essays, interviews, introductions to books, albums, and concerts, speeches, and rambling thoughts before I got into what I really procured the book to read, the last Dirk Gently story. I loved his line about art when he said, “I think the idea of art kills creativity.” (p. 158) And, I loved the story about his awkward experience in the train station with the cookies (pp. 150-151). It appears that he was sharing a table while waiting for a train. He had his coffee and a packet of cookies along with his morning newspaper. As he was reading his paper, the fellow reached over, opened the bag of cookies, too one out and began to eat it. Some British reserve kept him from confronting the man for his effrontery, so they actually ate the cookies in uncomfortable silence one-for-one. When the man left, Adams moved his paper and discovered an identical, but unopened bag of cookies under his paper. He was amused that he had thought so ill of the man while he was erroneously consuming the other man’s cookies. And he knew why this had occurred, but the other man never discovered the punch line. In the U.S., of course, there would have been a loud vocal confrontation at the very least. As for the title piece, the bare-bones portion of the unfinished Salmon of Doubt, it was delightful—even in its admittedly unpolished form. I followed the tortured logic of the cabbie who assumed that since people said, “Follow that cab!” in the movies and he, having had a long tenure as a cabbie had never heard that phrase, he must indeed have been the cab that all other cabs were following (pp. 249-250). I rolled my eyes with empathy when Dirk discovered a freezer cabinet full of “old, white, clenched things that he was now too frightened to try to identify.” (p. 226) I chuckled at the description of Gently’s office that was “old and dilapidated and remained standing more out of habit rather than from any inherent structural integrity” (p. 238) I really loved the slam on typical airline personnel speak (Airline Syllable Stress Syndrome—p. 253). I was sad that the book wasn’t complete, even in its current form.

MJ Nicholls

A collection of essays, speeches, ramblings unearthed on his hard drive(s), one short story culled from a BBC annual, and the titular unfinished Dirk Gently novel. The essays are breezy and witty, often lacking focus when discussing science and technology, but comprise (realistically) the most readable of his non-fiction output. There are some readers, yours included, who feel Adams spent himself on the Hitchhiker’s books: although the Dirk Gentlys were absurdist romps sutured with awesome logic, they didn’t hang together as novels. The short excerpt from The Salmon of Doubt, however, might prove me wrong: the usual warmth and humour is present, although in nascent form, (the narration even slips from third into first person, a sign of Adams’s dissatisfaction). But all in all, nobody who loves Adams could resist reading this book, despite snoozing through the travel/nature pieces to get to the stuff they want. It’s a pleasing gallimaufry. Savour it, because there is no more.

DDog

This was a fascinating book. It took me forever to read it as I only picked it up a few pages at a time, but that allowed me to savor the enjoyment. I hD never read any of Adams' essays or interviews that I can recall, only the fiction, so it was interesting to get another look at the way he thought. Reading things he wrote about computers in the '90s was especially fun, because we're living a lot of his predictions now. In the end the book has an appropriately unfinished feeling; you don't want it to end, yet it does, on a peculiar note and too soon.

Adam Heine

So, this is not my kind of book. The first two-thirds are basically a collection of blog posts, and well...there's a reason I don't buy blog post collection books. This was a birthday present :-) And the last third is a wonderfully written, but ultimately unfinished portion of a Dirk Gently novel which honestly makes me sad because now I'm left hanging. Forever.Adams' writing is hilarious, always. The fiction snippets, in particular, were everything I miss about him, but his "posts" were fun to read, too. The book just didn't stick with me because it's not the kind of blog I would have read: dated technology posts (it's not his fault they're dated, of course) and fingers-in-the-ears atheism. Douglas Adams seems like he was an awesome individual, and I would love to have met him, but clearly there are certain topics he and I would've had to avoid talking about, or else spent a couple of days talking about at great length :-)

Jenn

I highly recommend this book for any Douglas Adams lover!This book is an amalgam of several of Douglas Adams works, including letters and article he wrote during his lifetime. Made me nostalgic for what could have been if he had lived longer and gave us more.

Mpr

This work is unpolished, unfinished, and it's totally obvious. It cuts off as abruptly as the final piece of Bach (BWV 1080), leaving a vague disappointment and a void that won't ever be filled. I never met Douglas Adams, and I'll never have a chance to, but perhaps one day I'll visit his grave.Douglas Adams was unique in his ability for existential satire. From his portrayal of transgalactic airports to the way Norse gods would act in modern London, all his work shows a delightful talent for combining the surreal and the mundane. He mixes them, like a fancy drink, garnishes it, and offers you one of the most pleasingly different word cocktails that you'll ever taste.The Salmon of Doubt didn't contain this in the same density as his other novels, and perhaps if I were reading it without the necessary context of his writings I would be left confused and underwhelmed. But knowing Adams' oeuvre makes it almost-make-sense, in the way the first cut-off half of an absurdly complicated mystery novel might. I'm rating this five stars regardless of the unpolished writing because of the emotions it instills in me- the guaranteed sadness, the sense that I lost someone important to me before I'd ever even met him.

Frank

An enjoyable but utterly pointless book.I'm a huge Douglas Adams fan but sadly this book doesn't deserve his name. It's not that it's filth, or worthless. In fact this is has some lovely moments in the book and that's what gets it 2 stars from me.But the issue is it's a book that shouldn't exist. This should be free on the internet, or some other format. You get a large amount of articles, a few random chapters from a book, a book that no one even knows what series it belongs to exactly, and that's about it. The only author I felt worse about passing was Micheal Crichton, and his posthumous book was an almost finished manuscript, this unfortunately is just the building blocks.The worst book in the world would be one you talk about with the author, read all the chapters out of order, and piecemeal, read a rough draft, read an almost final version, and read the final copy. This is just the second step by itself, and because we all know there won't be a final book, it feels like a hollow last hurrah in my mind. I'll always miss Douglas Adams, but I'll honor him with his classics. Not what probably should have remained unpublished and unnecessary tidbits of his life.

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