Sex, Drugs and DNA: Science’s Taboos Confronted (Macmillan Science)

ISBN: 1403993424
ISBN 13: 9781403993427
By: Michael Stebbins

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Genres

Biology Currently Reading Evolution Non Fic Non Fiction Nonfiction Philosophy Politics Science To Read

Reader's Thoughts

George Dimitrov

The only chapter worth reading was chp. 1. The rest is arrogant leftist propaganda justified by scientific excuses.

Nathan

However entertaining the haranguer, one can only stand a harangue for a short period of time. Stebbins is entertaining on the failures of American politicians to understand what they're regulating, but I wearied of it by the end.

Broodingferret

Data driven and abrasive, Stebbins' diatribe on the woeful state of science education in the U.S. is amusing and depressingly detailed. Stebbins really communicates the hair-pulling frustration many scientists feel with the willful embracing of scientific ignorance in politics, the media, and among many of the people themselves. Written during Bush Jr.'s second term, Stebbins relies heavily on then-relevant issues, which date the work and can somewhat obfuscate its continued relevance; he would have done better by cataloging instances across several decades that demonstrated the steady decline of scientific knowledge rather than focusing primarily on the early 2000's. It's also clear that his expertise is in science and academia, as some of the solutions he puts fourth for some of the problems are superficially appealing, yet would be clearly problematic to even a novice student of economics. As Stebbins' primary goal, however, is to present the sorry state of science literacy in America, this book definitely qualifies as an engaging success.

Tory

Great book about the U.S. governments policies on scientific topics. Dr. Stebbins makes it easy for everyday people like me to understand scientific topics (like stem cell research), what the facts are and what the potentials are.

BAKU

" Lipopaxia. Your ticket to normal sized underwear " ( and then today ' Lorquess is approved by the FDA , ha ! )

Azadeh

For those of you who want to pull your hair out every time you hear the media, politician or pundit hijack and abuse science for their own personal gain, this book is for you.I'm only a couple chapters in but this book has made me laugh and given me insight into the complex world of scientific research.

Jessica

He tackles some controversial issues, thankfully with some humor and common speech. It is understandable, without advanced degrees, and still gets the information across. I found it very interesting, informative and his writing style to be witty. In a very smart manner of course. My favorite line? "Some of the most important information we have about the biology of sexual orientation comes from sheep." Ha! Go figure!

Jolene

The first chapter was okay, except the whole hypothetical science student analogy made me feel a little lost between the actual narratives. I just couldn't bring myself to finish the next chapter. However, I do like the way Stebbins inserted a bunch of swear words whenever applicable.

Nordia

The first chapter was great... and then it slowed down. Slowed way down.

Chuck

So far, so good! Pretty entertaining!

C Rocker

If you want to be educated on what's happening in America that directly affects you, TODAY - READ THIS.Every word in this book is deeply intoxicating, mind blowing, and is something every American should read!At a first glance I thought it would be daunting - however, it was the farthest thing from it - a very quick read!

Karen

Rant against government/religion meddling with science. Funny and interesting at times, a bit dry in others.

David

This book was not a "scholarly tome" written in a language convoluted to those who don't know scientific jargon. It's a call for attention to the problems with science and science education in America today. Unfortunately, many of the people who should read this book never will. Great points and some unusual arguments. Good book.

tyrel

please, everyone read this.. even if you're not a scientist

Don

Good book with a lot of information. A couple negative issues I have with this book is nothing is referenced, ever, and the author's arguments are backed up with generalized information, no information directly from the source. It would be helpful for the reader to be able to look into these issues more closely if there was more specific information. Sometimes the autor uses seemingly random comparisons to force the reader into a specific thought. The only example I can think off of the top of my head is comparing the similarties of the opinions of Christians to the uneducated regarding stem cell research. This book, along with any other piece of information you pick up, should be taken at the readers discrection; don't just follow the author's opinions but try to validate his arguments.

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