Star Wars: Episode VI – Die Rückkehr der Jedi-Ritter

ISBN: 3442352509
ISBN 13: 9783442352500
By: James Kahn George Lucas Lawrence Kasdan

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About this book

It was a dark time for the rebel alliance...Han Solo, frozen in carbonite, had been delivered into the hands of the vile gangster Jabba the Hutt. Determined to rescue him, Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, and Lando Calrissian launched a hazardous mission against Jabba's Tatooine stronghold.The Rebel commanders gathered all the warships of the Rebel fleet into a single giant armada. And Darth Vader and the Emperor, who had ordered construction to begin on a new and even more powerful Death Star, were making plans to crush the Rebel Alliance once and for all.Features a bonus section following the novel that includes a primer on the Star Wars expanded universe, and over half a dozen excerpts from some of the most popular Star Wars books of the last thirty years!

Reader's Thoughts

Don Gubler

Novelizations of movies are not really very helpful.

Becky

The dialogue was truly awful in places in this one. Once I gave myself permission to skip entire sections of dialogue of certain characters, I began to enjoy it a little bit. There was much to suffer through in this one, but, it had a few scenes that made it all worth while! The writing I felt wasn't wonderful, if these books in the trilogy weren't movies, I'm not sure they'd be anything fantastic to recommend them, to make them classics.

Lorien

Another brilliant adaptation of the movie. There are moments that couldn't be in the films, such as when Vader is Anakin once more, and looks on his son for the first and last time; or when Luke is being seduced to the dark side, in the most subtle, overwhelming ways that really make this book. The difference is great, and makes this a phenominal book. Truely enjoyed it and can't wait to see VII, and read it's book!

Megan

James Kahn is a former emergency room doctor who should never have been permitted to write. His version of ROTJ comes off like bad fanfiction written by a twelve-year-old: ludicrous in places, offensive in others, usually cheap, never worthy of the film he attempts to capture.

Jesse Booth

Again, great story, but not portrayed very well through the writing style. I did appreciate the opportunity to get in Luke's head a bit. It was interesting to see the battle within his mind over the light and dark side. Strangely enough, I felt a little sad reading about Yoda's death. He's the iconic Jedi. Simply awesome.

Beau Johnston

Not as dark as Star Wars: From the Adventures of Luke Skywalker, or The Empire Strikes Back, but still entertaining.

Richard Houchin

I read a lot of Star Wars novels in Jr. High. It took a few dozen books before I realized many of them just weren't all that stellar. Ah, well, I'll squirrel away the memories on the internet and free up a book shelf.This one was better as a movie.

Tom

This was then end of the Star Wars saga, or so I thought. Now I understand that there are both prequels as well as sequels. For example, there are three books on Han Solo. I guess I be doing some more Star Wars reading.

Mark

The last two books in the original trilogy series, "The Empire Strikes Back" and "Return of the Jedi," were the weakest of the movie novelizations. This one in particular had several passages that read like they were written in the dark on a steno pad by someone in a theater watching the movie at the time.

Sebastien

Après avoir lu le livre de l'épisode IV j'ai demander à mon père si son amis avait le livre suivant. Il s'informa et comble du malheur, il ne l'avait pas. Je suis dons aller à la bibliothèque et comme je n'avais pas vue les films depuis longtemps et qu'il ne repasseraient pas avant janvier 1993 (ils les passaient toujours dans ce coin là), j'ai demander à la bibliothèque d'avoir le livre qui était après La Guerre des Étoiles. Le commis me sortie alors Le Retour du Jedi. À cette époque je n'avais pas les films sur cassette (ils étaient rare et j'attendais la prochaine diffusion pour avoir une copie) donc dans ma tête j'avais oublier qu'en fait la suite était L'Empire Contre-Attaque. J'ai donc pris la décision de partir avec le livre et m'empresser de le lire par temps libre.Je commence alors la lecture et mon dieu que je trouvais qu'il manquait de background. Han Solo était emprisonner avec Jabba et Luc allait à sa rescousse. Bien que l'auteur décrivait bien en résumer ce qui s'était passé avant, je trouvais l'écart un peu abrupte. J'ai donc continuer sans poser de question, mais quand je suis arriver à la scène avec Yoda, j'ai tout de suite compris que j'avais passer un livre. Je suis donc aller à la bibliothèque pour me rendre compte que le commis ne connaissait pas la série et qu'il pensait qu'il y avait juste 2 livres et qu'ils n'avaient pas le deuxième livre.J'ai donc mis le livre sur pause le temps de revoir les film et ensuite j'ai terminer de lire le livre, qui est à mon avis à la hauteur du film avec les détails en plus. Le film rend très bien le livre et on voit que le livre fut écrit après le film, mais comme l'oeuvre entière de La Guerre des Étoiles, ce livre est un chef d'oeuvre pour les enfants et les ado. Les adulte y trouve aussi leur compte, mais doivent laisser tomber la logique un peu.Donc recommander à toute personne voulant découvrir la science fiction, n'oubliez pas cependant qu'il y a trois livre dans la série de La Guerre des Étoiles.

Christopher Rush

I wanted to do 4.5 stars, but I had to round up. This was a surprisingly enjoyable book. I didn't expect it to be bad, mind you - I was just pleasantly surprised by a lot of details in Kahn's book that aren't in the movie. At times Kahn does go a bit overboard: there's a few "from the depths of this" and "the uttermost that" and some more superlatives that detract more than they add, but they can be easily forgiven and excused. There aren't any new scenes like in the first book, and not a lot of rather drastic differences such like Yoda's description in the second book, but as I said Kahn does add quite a few character description scenes that flesh out the characters quite a bit in a very impressive and enjoyable way. In the Yoda and Luke scene, Kahn's additional dialogue clarified how foolish and wrong Luke was to leave Dagobah and try to save his friends in TESB. Thinking about it, Luke doesn't do anyone any good. It's exactly as Yoda says: he didn't save anyone, they had to save him; he wasn't ready to hear Vader was his father, he wasn't ready for that burden, and having left Yoda and gotten caught up in rescuing Han before completing his training, he couldn't complete his training the best way and instead had to carry that burden alone. Having seen the movies so many times growing up, before I started being what some people would call a "thinking person," it never occurred to me Luke was wrong at the end of TESB. He was totally wrong and suffered grievously for it. Kahn gives us a good deal of Luke's internal struggles throughout the book that don't always come out as well in the movie - Kahn has him dally with the Dark Side a lot more than he appears to in the movie, which makes sense while reading it (and also gives some credence to Dark Empire I and II).Han also gets a great character treatment here. In just a few pages, Kahn clearly lays out the path Han has gone through from the beginning of episode IV to the middle and end of episode VI: looking back at the movies, it's there, but the rapid pace of RotJ doesn't always allow for the internal perspectives Kahn presents, and thus the book is a great supplement, especially for fans of Han. One key scene that gets an extended treatment is the Ewok conference. Instead of just listening to C-3PO and welcoming them in, the Ewoks at first reject them (sort of like a bizarre reversal of the novel/movie version of the Ents in the Two Towers). Han then gives a passionate speech about how he used to be only for himself, and now the friends he has in the rebellion have awaken him to more important things beyond himself. Leia also gives a brief request - she also gets some fine character development, explaining her growing awareness of the Force and her connection to people, nature, and the universe in general. Wicket also gets to make a rousing speech about their necessity for joining the Rebellion. It's a fine scene and not nearly as corny as I've made it out to be (though some wastrels out there will no doubt disparage it, showing us more about their personal mediocrity than about the book itself).Kahn manages to streamline big battle scenes on the moon and in the sky rather well: with rapid dialogue and brief descriptions, we get all the key points of the conflicts without an inundation of details, while still bringing out emotional losses of the Ewoks and fighters. The Ewoks as a whole are treated rather well in the book. Far from being furry little nothings to please only 4-year-olds, Kahn treats the Ewoks will great respect, a very pleasing aspect of the book. They are brave, intelligent, sacrificial, and courageous.Darth Vader also gets important character elaboration in the book. Kahn's paragraphs about the mental workings of Vader are almost essential in understanding the movie (or rather, the whole story of Return of the Jedi). Here's another incident of me not thinking enough about the events and dialogues in the movies. If Vader really wants Luke to help him overthrow the Emperor at the end of ESB, why does he stop Luke from striking him down in RotJ? Kahn explains Vader does want Luke to kill the Emperor, but not until he is fully seduced by the Dark Side. If he kills him too soon, Luke could still return to his friends: Vader needs Luke to wait until he is fully Dark. Makes sense now, really. The final goodbye scene between Luke and Anakin is remarkable. Kahn gives us a great look into the mind of Anakin returning to control for a few brief moments: we experience with him genuine memories, both good and bad, pleasing and heartbreaking. Kahn even tells us about the lava that destroyed Anakin (one of the few continuity bits that makes sense ... unlike Leia's feelings/images about her real mother who apparently died four seconds after she was born). It's a great scene. Anakin feels genuine regret and love for Obi-Wan and his family. It's a remarkable scene, all together: neither Luke nor Anakin says "I love you," which is what you'd expect. Instead, the crux of their resolution is saving Anakin - and now that it is accomplished, and Anakin's good side returns even for a brief moment, Luke was truly right about him: there was still some good in him. Nothing else needs to be said between these two. Kahn humanizes Vader remarkably well in such a short space.A couple of two disappointments, though: 1) Luke does not say "Father, please, help me!" when he is being tortured by Palpatine, which I miss, since it helps cement the relational aspect of Vader's break from the Dark Side (fortunately there isn't Darth Vader shouting "NO!" so it is an aggregate win; 2) instead of seeing Yoda, Ben, and Anakin in their Force images at the end, Luke only imagines he sees them in the firelight at the Ewok celebration. This was more disappointing, but the movie did it right (and by "the movie" I refer, of course, to the original theatrical release with Sebastian Shaw).Despite these two bits, I really enjoyed this book. It moves quickly, just like the movie, but it is a good experience. The characters get fleshed out - even Jerjerrod gets more time, and Lando gets more attention than he does in the film - and generally things make a lot more sense. Even if you are a casual Star Wars fan, you should read this book. You'll be glad you did.

Butterflykatana

I had this book sitting in the toy box for years before finally one summer deciding to read it. Well I had one over my friends on reading the movie. But it had real killer spots where it hit a wall for its ill written spots.

John Yelverton

Not quite as good as the other adaptations that I have read, but it's still a fun read.

Mark Oppenlander

I hadn't read this book since my teens. It was eye opening to revisit it now. I agree with the other reviewers who have complained about the writing in this, the novelization of the third Star Wars film. I doubt I noticed how bad the writing was at the age of 13. I don't know who James Kahn is or what else he has done, but he seems like a bit of a hack. He writes some of the most inane prose I have ever read and his attempts to spell out Chewie and Artoo's dialogue are ugly. His work with characters like Lando is painfully one note and he throws in the names of the various minor characters ("Logray!" "Weequay!" etc.) as if he is shilling for Mattel.On the other hand, Kahn does some nice work with the Luke and Vader characters, especially as they both struggle with the Light and Dark side of the force. Some of his flashback sequences and inner monologues for these two characters are actually quite well written. And he certainly catches the speed and verve of the movies, telling this story in a mere 180 pages. The scenes fly by, and you can almost hear the John Williams score in the background.So at the end of the day, an OK but uneven read. I recognize that the three stars I have given it are as much for the entertaining nature of the original story and my memory of the feelings it produced in me as an adolescent as they are for anything inherently good about the book itself.

Adam K.

Adequate and satisfactory novelization. I've read almost all the Star Wars novelizations thus far (only have episode III) to go. It's always interesting to see the details the authors add, I presume from early copies of Lucas' scripts or storylines. There is a bit more menace and culture to the Ewoks in Kahn's novelization. Yes, they're cute and cuddly, but their fireside council in which they make Luke, Han, & co. "part of the tribe" is considerably more weighted with their own tribal philosophy. Han's "friendship is magic" speech at said council was also a very interesting touch, although I'm glad the finished film didn't use it. It takes away some of his swagger, and I always enjoyed the mystique of whether Han might still be in it for the fortune and glory or whether he'd discovered the greater purpose. The tension between the two was always the best part of his character. I guess I hadn't considered before reading this how much time may have passed since Empire Strikes Back. When Luke shows up, he's obviously a much more mature Jedi. The novel covers this. He's been hiding out on Tatooine, making sure all the pieces are in place, working on his mad skills and building a new light saber. I'm sure there are some in-between-episodes novels out there somewhere, and I'd be interested in what all Luke was up to in that time. Did he return to train more with Yoda, perhaps? It always bugged me that the series left me feeling he had only seen Yoda twice, and the second was at Yoda's death. Anyway, good stuff. A quick read, and it only adds to my love for the films. BTW, this is completely tangential, but Terry Brooks' novelization of Episode I is fantastic. I'm biased toward Brooks, anyway, he being my first favorite author. His fond memories of writing the book, contrasted with his horrible memories of novelizing Spielberg's "Hook," might redeem Lucas in the eyes of some haters. Lucas gave him a lot of artistic license, whereas Spielberg & Co. left Brooks completely in the dark and denied him access to much of the material (like scripts, sets, etc.) Brooks would need access to in order to write a decent novelization.

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