The Dhammapada: The Sayings of the Buddha

ISBN: 0609608886
ISBN 13: 9780609608883
By: Gautama Buddha Thomas Byrom

Check Price Now

Genres

Buddhism Classics Currently Reading Favorites Non Fiction Philosophy Religion Spiritual Spirituality To Read

About this book

The Dhammapada is one of the most popular and accessible books of Buddhist scripture. Undoubtedly one of the greatest teachers in history, the Buddha has had an immeasurable influence on the human race. He taught that our suffering stems from desire and that the only way to remove desire is to purify the heart. Dhamma means law, discipline, justice, virtue, truth -- that which holds things together. Pada means way, path, step, foot. So, The Dhammapada is the path of virtue, or the way of truth. Thomas Byrom’s lyrical and aphoristic rendering of the Buddha’s teaching reveals its practical and timeless simplicity.Bell Tower’s Sacred Teachings series offers essential spiritual classics from all traditions. May each book become a trusted companion on the way of truth, encouraging readers to study the wisdom of the ages and put it into practice each day.

Reader's Thoughts

Steve Woods

This is the primary text of the Buddhas teachings. A good translation with a very thorough introduction by the author that taught me a lot I didn't know. The texts can often be a bit meaning less for westerners who have no context within which to place them This one is pretty profound, I use it by simply reading one chapter everyday, it helps keep me pointed in the right direction and it's great to have enough familiarity to be able to source the teachings of others on the path whose books I read. Gotta get it if Buddhism has any appeal for you

Cassandra Kay Silva

Very good edition. The text is beautiful. The message is good. This is the kind of thing that can be read and reread throughout your lifetime and will bring different meanings at different places in your life. I got a copy at the library. I will be looking for a personal copy to keep for my own. So beautiful. I really appreciated the accompanying notes.

Roxana Saberi

Just reread this. Little and big gems of wisdom throughout.

Janie Cakes

This is a book filled with Buddhist quotes, and only quotes. These quotes are meant to inspire, and to teach a person morals. Some of these quotes were religiously biased, and some quotes were too repetitive. Pretty much, you'd have the same quote for a whole page, or up to 2 pages i.e. "'He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me' -- in those who harbor such thoughts hatred will never cease." "'He abused me, he beat me, he defeated me, he robbed me' -- in those who do not harbor such thoughts hatred will cease."...notice how only a few words change? There are plenty of quotes that do that in this book. There are even a few quotes that are just too old for this time period, very old fashioned. Despite all that, every 6 quotes i could find 1 or 2 really amazing quotes. Those quotes are enough to make you keep on reading and hoping to stumble upon the next one. I recommend this if you are trying to be a better Buddhist [FYI I'm not Buddhist], but you could read it just to gain some insight to life.here's a couple of my favorite quotes,"let the wise man guard his thoughts, for they are difficult to perceive, very artful, and they rush wherever they list: thoughts well guarded bring happiness""a man is not an elder because his head is gray; his age may be ripe, but he is called 'Old-in-vain'"

Jesse Dixon

This edition of the Dhammapada contains a lot of extra information, the Dhammapada verses take up less than a third of the book. It contains an 86 page introduction by Eknath Easwaran which provides interesting background information to Buddhism. There are also chapter introductions by Stephen Ruppenthal for each chapter, or a pair of two chapters, which has insightful information for understanding the verses. This was an easy to read and inspiring introduction to Buddhism and the Dhammapada.There are 423 numbered verses in 26 chapters that provide spiritual guidance and inspiration. There are verses that encourage meditiation, some that show karma, cause and effect, and showing compassion and patience. Here is a small sample:1 Our life is shaped by our mind; we become what we think. Suffering follows an evil thought as the wheels of a cart follow the oxen that draw it.2 Our life is shaped by our mind; we become what we think. Joy follows a pure thought like a shadow that never leaves.125 If you harm a pure and innocent person, you harm yourself, as dust thrown against the wind comes back to the thrower.223 Conquer anger through gentleness, unkindness through kindness, greed through generosity, and falsehood by truth.

Abailart

To read forever.

Arun Divakar

There are books to be read and books to be comprehended. The second class is like learning to ride a bike : you climb on it to fall down & you keep repeating the gesture until at least shakily you can move forth a few feet unaided. What is contained in this book while at a first read is absurdly simple in its spartan-ness is a very difficult set of guidelines to live with.The inspiration to know more about the Buddha was an unlikely source, a little trinket I bought. It was a resemblance of the Ashoka Pillar. After glancing at it for long minutes during which it refused to do anything at all, I started checking the internet for the Buddhist Emperor and found it very amusing. A wildly passionate follower even drew a comparison saying that Alexander would have been but a Thug against the leadership practices of Ashoka. Everywhere resounded but one principle behind this legend of a man : Buddhism. Scouring this water body of information named the internet, I came up with the name of this book. There is but one foundation that underlies Buddhism that I could comprehend even with what little reading I have on this topic. This is about suffering (in Buddhist terms Dukha ). The identification of pain or suffering, the cessation of pain and the path to the cessation of pain is what this entire belief system seems to be based out of. It is very easy to read a book that speaks to you on letting go of your desires but to implement that in practice would need more steel than even an army training camp can instill in you. There are many parallels here to the Hindu & Eastern Mysticism schools of thought. For eg : There is mention of life lived without an eye to victory or loss for a life of tranquility. With a few modifications here and there, Krishna suggests the same to Arjuna during the discourse of the Bhagavad Gita. If memory serves me right, it was about the need to perform one's duties without a thought of victory or loss for it is such thoughts that lead one to sorrow. Then again many a teaching here are akin to the ten commandments in that all time bestseller as well.The translation as offered by Glenn Wallis is interesting and insightful to read. I in fact spent more time going through his notes than reading through the core text. The next time around I would want to stick to the core text and take it in little sips as a hot brew on an extremely cold and wretched day. In short : It is an energizer !Something from the text which bears an uncanny resemblance to the society we belong to now as it was centuries ago : Atula, this is from long ago, it is not recent: they find fault with one who sits silently, they find fault with one who speaks much, they find fault with one who speaks but little. There is no one in this world who is not faulted.

Chris Corbell

This is my favorite little book in the world.

Naliniprasad

Very good translation of original pali version by Eknath aswaran.Full of wisdom for leading our everyday life painlessly.One of the simplest interpretations of the Buddhist classic.Planning to read it again.Includes exvcellent introduction and commentary by the author.

tighe

Very reflective and wholesome moral truths for living, quite a fresh read in the world of inconsequential candy reads. While one might not agree with every Buddhist principle for living, as I myself don't, the general truths that you pick up and contemplate throughout the day are hard to escape. Easy and quick, yet full of substance and worthy of review time and again.

Greg

I really appreciate the accuracy of S. Radhakrishnan's translations. His translation of the Upanishads is excellent as is his translation of the Gita. This particular volume is an excellent rendition of the Dhammapada. As a philosopher, he wrote a lengthy introduction to the doctrines of Therevada Buddhism. He also deals with some of the problems related to the historical Buddha. This volume also provides not just an accurate translation, but also the transliterated Pali text. It is helpful for the advanced student of buddhism for checking up on some of the key concepts.

Paul

It's not up for review.

Warun

this was a spiritually fulfilling book.it helped me understand the life of the Buddha and the reasoning behind his actions and spiritual life decisions.Siddhartha is the son of a Brahmin's sun who ventures of because he wanted to live the life of samana who are wondering monks who live their life with our possessions and try to find eternal peace.he romeos the earth and ends up running into this man they called the Buddha ,which means enlightened one .he has lived for centuries and will finally be one with the universe.as every other samana so did Siddhartha.on the path of enlightenment Siddhartha faces life's many deadly sines such as lust, gluttony, greed, sloth , wrath , envy ,pride.and he over came them all and at the end of the book he sees that all these adventures took him in a complete circle and he finally reaches enlightenment.my favorite quote is "knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom".p.124because it makes you really think about and you finally see that its is true and very wise.i that this was a very wise and spiritually satisfying. I would want to spend the rest of my life listening to the teachings of the Buddha.

Rachel Cotterill

This is one of the world's most influential philosophical texts, and lies at the heart of Buddhism, so it's not surprising that it was an interesting read with plenty to think about. The translation is quite old (hence being freely available online) and it isn't always perfectly clear. There are some ambiguities of language, for example in several places reaching Nirvana is defined as being above good and evil (amongst other things), and yet requiring the avoidance of evil (and sin) to achieve it. I fear I'm missing something here, and possibly the original text has subtly different words for different concepts, but my language skills aren't up to reading this in the original!

David Withun

The Dhammapada, a collection of sayings of the Buddha, is certainly a book filled with wisdom from a very wise man. It was great to read it and, as a Christian, to be able to appreciate his insights into human nature and into the nature of reality. Buddhist spirituality has always deeply impressed me and I was certainly not disappointed by reading this book. Easwaran's notes are generally very helpful, though his constant need to compare Christianity and Christ, neither of which he seems to understand very well, with Buddhism and the Buddha was a bit annoying at times. Overall, I think this is a book from which much insight can be gained and I recommend it to others as well.

Share your thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *