The Salmon of Doubt (Dirk Gently, #3)

ISBN: 0345455290
ISBN 13: 9780345455291
By: Douglas Adams

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Genres

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About this book

"Łosoś zwątpienia" składa się z dziesięciu rozdziałów powieści, nad którą Douglas Adams pracował w chwili śmierci w maju 2001 roku, dwóch opowiadań oraz zadziwiającego zbioru przejawów jego twórczości, odzyskanych z twardego dysku jego ulubionego macintosha: od niezwykle "poważnego" traktatu poświęconego niestosowności noszenia krótkich spodni, do wykładów odzwierciedlających wyjątkowe zrozumienie przez Adamsa światów naturalnego, technologicznego i filozoficznego. W tomie znajdziemy także artykuły na tak różne tematy, jak religia, przetworniki prądu, które powodują całkowity bałagan w dziedzinie komputerów, litera Y czy miłosna afera z dwiema sukami w Nowym Meksyku.Zarówno dla miłośników Douglasa Adamsa, jak i czytelników, którzy go jeszcze nie znają, "Łosoś zwątpienia" jest niepowtarzalnym szwedzkim stołem, pełnym wariactw, produktów cywilizacyjnych i przedziwnych dzieł stworzonych przez życie, wszechświat i całą resztę.

Reader's Thoughts

Michael Sentman

It is unfortunate that there are not more books by Douglas Adams. I would love to be able to read more novels, to be surrounded by his humor, intelligence, and imagination but his works are more spread out between different medias than just books. This book is a collection of mostly random letters, anecdotes, and the beginning of an unfinished novel put together posthumously. Some of the stories are very interesting, lending a perspective into Douglas' life and interests and closes it with a reminder of how brilliant his writing was, even when it was unfinished. The book is quick to read as none of the individual works that comprise this collection are very long and it has its insights and wisdom like his other works. While the book is pervaded by Adam's unmatched wit and humor, finishing the novel left me sad, but only because I know that there is no more to be read.

Karen Terrell

Ohmygosh. I found myself grieving at the end of this book - all teary-eyed and sniffling - it felt like I was saying a final good bye to a dear friend. This was Adams's last book - compiled and arranged in the year after his death by his friends and editors. Coming to the end of Salmon of Doubt, and realizing there'd be no more words written by Adams, was really hard for me. I loved this book. The humor, the whimsy, Adams's unique take on the world - it was all there. I wish I'd gotten to know his writing while he was here with us - and I'm so sorry he no longer is.

Aaron

I loved this. Not all of it, but the parts at the beginning. This is not a book, or rather, it is not a coherent story. Douglas Adams was working towards a book called the Salmon of Doubt when he died. This is a collection of writing, which includes many of the things he had written which may, or may not have ended up on his book. There are also many writings by other people, people who know Douglas Adams. I laughed and I cried many times as I listened to this. This book will do little or nothing for someone who has little or no experience with Douglas Adams. If you want to experience what I have experienced, and get the full effect of this book, you must first listen to the BBC radio recordings of the Hitchhiker's Guide series. Then I'd recommend watching the BBC TV show, then I would read or listen to the novels, and finally, watch the movie. If I am not mistaken, this is the order in which he wrote them, although I am not convinced he actually had much to do with the TV show. There are also the Dirk Gently books, which you can read or listen to at any point, as long as they are after the radio broadcasts and before this book. We lost a genius when we lost Douglas Adams. If you are a friend of mine, I am sure you've had some experience of Mr. Adams, but perhaps you haven't had the full experience. I highly recommend it.

Ippino

Passata l'iniziale diffidenza verso questo genere di operazioni, che mi sembrano sempre molto commerciali e prive di amore verso gli autori scomparsi, mi sono trovato davanti qualcosa di gradevole e gustoso.La prima metà, saggistica, è buona, con articoli ed aneddoti su vari aspetti dell'ingegno umano e dell'umana condizione, che fanno riflettere, sorridere, interrogarsi. Certo, alcuni sono un pò sottotono, ma tutti hanno il pregio di farci conoscere meglio questo autore, le sue idee ed il suo modo di pensare.La seconda parte contiene un breve racconto dell'universo della Guida Galattica ("Sicuro, sicurissimo, perfettamente sicuro") ed i primi capitoli de "Il salmone del dubbio", nuova avventura del detective olistico Dirk Gently, incompiuta.Questa parte è tanto meravigliosa, nella misura in cui amate questo autore: se la Guida Galattica vi ha lasciati indifferenti, non troverete nulla di interessante. Se Dirk Gently non vi è piaciuto, odierete lo spreco di pagine dedicato alla sua nuova avventura, anche se incompiuta.Ma se viceversa li avete apprezzati, troverete "pane per i vostri denti": storie e personaggi assurdi, stravaganti, a tratti follemente divertenti.Personalmente ho gradito molto la parte saggistica, perchè mostra l'uomo, prima dello scrittore. Un uomo arguto e sagace, raffinato nell'intelletto, dannatamente "british", capace di tratteggiare situazioni ed idiosincrasie del nostro tempo.Viceversa il racconto incompleto di Gently, proprio perchè incompleto lascia l'amaro in bocca.

Buck Ward

The Salmon of Doubt is a collection of Douglas Adams’ writings gleaned from his hard drive by his friends and family and published after his untimely death. If you are an Adams fan, I’m sure you will enjoy this.I heard the audiobook version which started with eulogies from some of his notable friends. Most of the book is essays and musings written in the nineties, some of which are clever and amusing. Adams had a penchant for electronic devices, computers and gizmos and he wrote copiously about such things. Unfortunately they are quite a bit dated, being from two decades ago. He would have loved smart phones and iPads.There are two works of fiction towards the end of the book. The first is an inane story having something to do with spaceship beings and lobsters. (This is the only science fiction in the book, and I use that term advisedly.) The second is The Salmon of Doubt, a story with Adams’ character Dirk Gently, an inept private detective. It wasn’t particularly good.

Eric Hendrixson

Okay, the three star rating requires an explanation. The idea behind this book was to publish an unfinished novel and a number of Adams' uncollected writings in a collection for the fans. This is not a book for casual readers of Adams but for people who have read everything Adams wrote and want more. It was exactly what I thought I was buying, so why the mediocre rating?There was nothing wrong with the writing. It's Douglas Adams, so the writing was good. My issue was with the collection and editing. There are short stories included in the collection that have already been published elsewhere. I know I read "Young Zaphod Plays it Safe" in the leatherbound "More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy." Another problem is the republished interviews in which Adams gives extremely consistent answers to similar questions. I don't fault Adams for this. It makes him very credible, but it makes the book repetitive. This repetition makes it a book useful only to Adams completists. However, I guess this is exactly the audience for whom the book was compiled. Had someone told me this beforehand, I still would have picked up a copy of the book.

Tracie

I enjoyed the forwards and short stories that were in this book. But I was also saddened by the ending when I could no longer put the fact that Douglas Adams death was not just a fictitous vicious rumor but the cold truth. After reading so many of his wonderful creations I feel as though I have lost a close friend. I am saddened by the fact that his words, the ones that don't grace pulped pages, are no longer coming. The world was a better place with Douglas Adams in it.

Alan

Douglas Adams was brilliant—and it pains me to have to put that in the past tense. His novel-in-progress, The Salmon of Doubt, was cut short by Adams' untimely death in 2001. But this posthumous collection of miscellany from his computer's hard drive, also called The Salmon of Doubt, showcases Adams' brilliance, and is a worthy addition to his canon.There's not much of the planned novel here—just a few chapters, and that's not what impressed me most about this collection anyway. The things that amazed me most about The Salmon of Doubt were: first, the breadth and depth of Adams' interests, as revealed here particularly in his discussions of Last Chance to See, written with Mark Carwardine, a serious attempt to document and, perhaps, even save some of Earth's vanishing species. And, second, the evidence of Adams' prescience when it came to computing and the Internet. Far from being just a comedic writer, the interviews and excerpts included here show clearly that Adams had his finger on the pulse of the Internet, more so than many self-acclaimed pundits and insiders. He foresaw the importance of wirelessness, for example, and the utility of thumbs for texting, well before such things were common knowledge.The Salmon of Doubt isn't a complete novel, and never will be now—and that is tragic. But The Salmon of Doubt is one last amazing glimpse into Adams' mind, and for that I am grateful.

MJ Nicholls

A collection of essays, speeches, ramblings unearthed on his hard drive(s), one short story culled from a BBC annual, and the titular unfinished Dirk Gently novel. The essays are breezy and witty, often lacking focus when discussing science and technology, but comprise (realistically) the most readable of his non-fiction output. There are some readers, yours included, who feel Adams spent himself on the Hitchhiker’s books: although the Dirk Gentlys were absurdist romps sutured with awesome logic, they didn’t hang together as novels. The short excerpt from The Salmon of Doubt, however, might prove me wrong: the usual warmth and humour is present, although in nascent form, (the narration even slips from third into first person, a sign of Adams’s dissatisfaction). But all in all, nobody who loves Adams could resist reading this book, despite snoozing through the travel/nature pieces to get to the stuff they want. It’s a pleasing gallimaufry. Savour it, because there is no more.

Lena

This is a delightful and maddening book. This collection of essays, columns, speech transcripts and random musings was culled from Adams' computers after his tragic death at the age of 49. The collection offers new insight into one of the world's most gifted humorists, and there is both pleasure and education to be had in reading his thoughts on such diverse topics as music, atheism, evolutionary biology, conservation and computers.The last section of the book contains the beginning of an unfinished Dirk Gently novel tentatively titled The Salmon of Doubt. Though Adams was an avowed atheist, the frustration I felt at having this tale end so abruptly was enough to make me wish he's wrong about the afterlife and hope some trance channel will track him down in the ethers so we can all find out just who was sending Mr. Gently those wire transfers and what, exactly, the rhinoceros was doing on the highway to Santa Fe.

Sherry

This book was a most enjoyable collection of Douglas Adams' essays, short stories, lectures, and ten fun chapters of a sort-of Salmon of Doubt novel. The lecture "Is there an artificial God?" was chocked full of Adam's unique sense of the absurd, and I liked it an awfully lot. Since these writings were gathered posthumously, it sure made me want to finally get around to reading all of his novels that I haven't read, yet, cuz there'll be no mas. Sad. I'm definitely going to read those Dirk Gently novels now. Life, the universe and everything as explained by Douglas Adams ... "provoking thoughts you didn't know you had."“All opinions are not equal. Some are a very great deal more robust, sophisticated and well supported in logic and argument than others.” ― Douglas Adams, The Salmon of Doubt

DDog

This was a fascinating book. It took me forever to read it as I only picked it up a few pages at a time, but that allowed me to savor the enjoyment. I hD never read any of Adams' essays or interviews that I can recall, only the fiction, so it was interesting to get another look at the way he thought. Reading things he wrote about computers in the '90s was especially fun, because we're living a lot of his predictions now. In the end the book has an appropriately unfinished feeling; you don't want it to end, yet it does, on a peculiar note and too soon.

Nathaniel Chew

tragically interrupted :'(

Tortla

Douglas Adams was a clever, intelligent man. This compilation of his essays, short stories, interviews, and what they could scrounge up of the work-in-progress "The Salmon of Doubt" (unfinished due to his untimely death in 2001) makes for a nice homage to the man. Also, it's amusing to see his name abbreviated to DNA in interviews.

Jenn

I highly recommend this book for any Douglas Adams lover!This book is an amalgam of several of Douglas Adams works, including letters and article he wrote during his lifetime. Made me nostalgic for what could have been if he had lived longer and gave us more.

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