Thoreau: Walden And Other Writings

ISBN: 055314488X
ISBN 13: 9780553144888
By: Henry David Thoreau

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Reader's Thoughts

Bridget

Walden isn't an easy read - the first section in particular is long, dense, and occasionally annoying. But it's also very quotable, and later sections are filled with wonderful images. I'm not usually one for descriptive writing, but I've marked passages in this book just for their loveliness. In short, it's worth the attempt. Even if you don't get far, you'll get to read some great stuff.

Adam

If Edgar Allan Poe was the original goth, Henry David Thoreau was the original obnoxious vegan. His tone at the beginning of the book is like a know-it-all kid in his first year of self-employment: smarmy and convinced he's cracked the code on the only right way to live. As the book goes on, he mellows out a little. I guess living in the woods was good for him. While still being condescending of his neighbors (“…his little broad-faced son worked cheerfully at his father's side the while, not knowing how poor a bargain the latter had made”), it’s the side-stories, like meeting fishermen, ice-cutters and packs of free-roving hounds, and the native american legends of the lake, that make up the parts worth reading. I wanted to like this book, because I appreciate how it’s inspired some people I respect (Don Henley?), but it was so difficult to read, it put me to sleep every time I tried to read a page until I switched to the audio version.

Andrea

Love Walden!! It makes me laugh how everyone perceives Thoreau to be a serious writer....but if you really read what he is saying he is very sarcastic and witty. I laughed so hard. He also has a lot of really great insights about life and people. For example, he only spent six weeks of the year working to make money to suppport him for the rest of the year. Sign me up for that work schedule!

Russ

Walden is a series of essays that are best appreciated through repeated readings over an extended period of time. While I've finally read them, the density of the individual pieces are such that I'm not sure I can say I fully understand them, let alone appreciate them. This is a book I expect to come back to from time to time.

Jenifer

From an old journal entry of mine; "Interesting that just now developers are trying to buy Walden Woods for the purpose of building apartments or office buildings or something of the sort. Some popular singing artists, headed by Don Henly are trying to save the woods. I listened to an interview of Mr. Henly recently in which he said that Thoreau was in fact one of our first "environmentalists" and that saving the symbol of this important movement should be first on our list of actions to be taken. It took me awhile to catch on to Thoreau's philosophy and style of writing. I would like to read "Walden" again, especially taking notes of some of his striking comments for quotes."

Lydia

I was actually drawn to reading Thoreau, after I discovered a quote of his. I went to my school library, and checked this book out. It is hard sometimes to focus on what you're reading, it's easy to forget what you've read. None the less, his writing is very beautiful and something everyone should at atleast attempt to read!

Shana

I've begun this book nearly three times since my 18th birthday and I'm determined to keep it on my night table until I finish it. Not because I'm terribly compelled by it or it's language, but because my fictional main character has read it. :-/ Also, for my own sanity, I am interested to see what philosophical avenues early Americans walked, and perhaps where they've led to today.

Ashley

If you'd like to read more about what I thought of Walden, visit my blog, Books from Bleh to Basically Amazing.I'm giving this 3 stars, although I feel it probably deserves a 2.5 or so. I was not impressed with Thoreau. I felt that his writing was presumptous and self righteous. He seems to condemn everyone and really speaks sometimes with this annoying air of superiority. I felt that there were many times he rambled on about nothing of importance, and that the 300+ pages could have probably been better written in 100. That being said, I would like to try and reread this book in a few years. There were several little kernels of wisdom that struck me, and a few times that I was really interested in what I was reading, but for the most part, it bored me and I fell asleep or dozed off reading this book far more than any other book I have ever read. Hopefully the next time will be better. I really wanted to like this one!I haven't read all of the other writings in the book, although I've read parts. I should get to those soon. Who knows, maybe starting smaller (Civil Disobedience wasn't so bad...) will be helpful.

Jon

This is a classic bit of lit from Mr. Thoreau. I'm only about halfway through Walden, but you get the picture of a stubborn, bitter, sarcastic but brilliant writer who saw through all the technology and modernism of his day. At times, Thoreau waxes quite spiritual, quoting from the Bhagavad Gita and other Eastern texts. If you can muddle through his tangents on Philosophy, excesses of modern man, condemnation of the lack of education, etc. and imagine yourself sharing his airy home on Walden Pond, you will thoroughly enjoy this book!-JR

Barrett Brassfield

Have to agree with E.B. White (author of Charlotte's Web, among other things) who once said that every high school senior should be given a copy of Walden upon graduation. Many of course will choose not to read it but for those who do, and make it through the slog that is the first chapter, Thoreau's timeless classic offers much wisdom on thoughtful living. Why thoughtful living? Because Walden is full of what of what buddhists refer to as the fire of attention. Each chapter, even the dreadful first, Economy, is full of an intense attention to detail both philosophical and practical. Walden may have been written by a 19th century New Englander but it's implications travel far beyond that limited scope of time and space. At the very least, readers of Walden in any age will be encouraged to forgo the way of the lemming and instead give a little thought to each step taken in life, as opposed to just mindlessly stumbling off the proverbial cliff of life.

Christopher Daniel Miles

Though I read this once when I was in my teens, and again later in college, it continues to be a revelation to me. Thoreau as a philosopher and commentator challenges all of our assumptions, and sees as relevant today as in 1854. Thoreau is the true heir to the ancient Stoic philosophers, Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius.

Enamul Haque

In Walden, Thoreau wanted to get the most from his life by determining what was really important, and he did that by removing himself somewhat from the normal life of Concord, Massachusetts in the 1840's. Thoreau focuses a lot on details in his writing. Every sentence the reader reads is filled with captivity. The words he puts on paper come to live as one reads his book. It seems as though he sometimes gets carried away when writing about something, because it almost gets boring, however, the point the he is carrying across is intellectual, and inspirational. Thoreau’s view on life’s necessities being frivolous is almost extreme; however, if one thinks about it, Thoreau is right. Reading about Thoreau and his transcendentalist experience really changed my perspective on a lot of things. There are so many things each person has, half of them that they don’t even need. Thoreau’s experience teaches people a lesson and gives them something to be thankful for without taking anything for granted.

Kathy

I heard a lot about our Mr. Thoreau and wanted to see what he was all about, so my wonderful husband bought me this book.All I can say is I only read the first, extremely long, chapter. I got tired of him patting himself on his genius back and talking about how wrong society was. He has some great ideas, but most of the time I feel his views on life are a little twisted and spoiled. I did not like this book at all and would not recommend it!

Ammie

I did not finish this book. I made it a third of the way through, all the while hoping that perhaps he would begin to talk about actually living in the woods instead of just complaining about how everybody should live in the woods, and then I stopped. Maybe he does later on. But seriously, I got tired of all the whining about other people. Blerg.

Jen

Well, I FINALLY finished this, and I'm glad I did. I had a preconceived notion of Henry David Thoreau as some sort of god of philosophy, with whose every word I would, of course, agree with. Uh-uh. While I did enjoy his writing about nature, I found his tone in the philosophical sections condescending -- especially the part where he's telling a farmer whose house he stops at how wonderful his life would be if he just lived like Thoreau. I agree with his ideas about living life simply and doing one's best to enjoy it, but wow, was he a curmudgeon.

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