Transmetropolitan, Volume 10: One More Time

ISBN: 1840238259
ISBN 13: 9781840238259
By: Warren Ellis Darick Robertston Rodney Ramos

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About this book

Spider is close to finally nailing US President Callahan, whose attempts to hide his 'unusual' passions have left a bloody trail in his wake. But time is short: the President has declared martial law and his death squads are closing in on Spider.

Reader's Thoughts

Sara Gray

Much funnier and more prescient than I anticipated, Transmetropolitan was a funny, scathing read, but I found myself distracted by the comic book violence and rather pat, easy answers to difficult questions. (Child prostitutes? It's mommy's fault! Not endemic poverty!) That said, Ennis confronts apathy and the news in ways that are startling and intelligent. It feels more and more that we're living in Transmet's world, and Ennis saw it coming.

Donald Armfield

This comic series is an insane world that Warren Ellis explains so engrossing. Darick Robertson the main artist really knows how to draw out the bizarre mind of Spider Jerusalem and the strange world that Warren Ellis brings us.The series is about a lunatic journalist who hates the world around him. The president is his main target who he tries to pretty much take a dump on. With his filthy assistants by his side its a read you will never forget

Trin

Okay, I have to take back all the mean things I said earlier this year about Warren Ellis. I still don’t get what the big deal with The Authority is, or why his runs on Iron Man or Hellblazer are so great, but this—this I get. This I love. Spider Jerusalem is fucked up and sexy and brilliant—my first real comics crush in years (and guys with too many tattoos are going to have a much better chance with me until it wears off, so thank Ellis for that, boys). Channon and Yelena, his filthy assistants, are awesome, too, so check check check, you’ve got real characters that change and grow. And plot! Fantastic plot! Not to mention pretty superb world-building—I believe in this weird, technologically explosive, still basically self-involved vision of the future. This was the fun and insightful political reading I was looking for earlier in the year, and it’s too bad I had to wait for my friend to practically smack me over the head with it, but you don’t have to make the same mistake! No! Go read it now!

Sam Quixote

Spider and the Smiler meet up for a final "interview" and the fate of Spider and his brain disease is revealed.Warren Ellis and Darick Robertson end the series in the tone of the books that went before it, with the kind of bravado and knack for compelling storytelling readers have come to expect from this duo and "One More Time" is a fitting end to this brilliant character.I will say that I felt the showdown with Spider and Smiler, while satisfying, was a bit uninventive in how Spider brings Smiler down - it's a trick that he pulled on the President earlier in the series when he was campaigning and I felt the Smiler's confessions to be a bit drawn out and overlong. And also, if he'd gone that far and was literally holding a gun to Spider's head, why not pull the trigger?That was maybe my only problem with the book, otherwise its righteous words and politics echo through the years, 10 now since it ended, with the same potency as when they were written. And the series holds up really well, I enjoyed this second reading of the series as much as the first time.The little details are hilarious too. Throughout the series there have been little messages of "Free Steve Chung" on the sidewalk screens and in the final issue is a newspaper headline with "Steve Chung Freed!". Spider's garden also spells out "F*** YOU" when looked at from an aerial vantage, and the border guard from issue 1 gets his comeuppance.It ends in the best way possible, I won't spoil it, but it's brilliant and makes me wish Ellis and Robertson would return to do another series with Spider. If you've never read "Transmetropolitan" (and why would you be reading a review of the last book in the series if you haven't?) or, like me, it's been years since you read it, pick it up again and treat yourself to some quality, original comics fare.Spider, you degenerate - I love you. Thanks Warren and Darick for this amazing series!This particular edition is also worth getting as you get “I Hate It Here” and “Filth of the City” which make up “Volume 0: Tales of Human Waste”, along with “Volume 10: One More Time”, so you’re getting two books for the price of one!

Jonas Cannon

Easily the best comic book series I have ever read.

Aaron

Granted I started reading this series a good 5 years after it had completed its run, but still, finishing this final volume knowing there's no more to come makes me sad. I can only reenter the City now by rereading previous volumes (which I'm sure I'll do). Everything about this series is perfect. The thoroughly-imagined world, the incomparable Spider Jerusalem, the harsh satire, and the punch-you-in-the-nuts art. Ellis turned journalism into an action movie.

Owen

A grand finale for a character deserving of every syllable of 'magnificient bastard'.

Drown Hollum

One More Time is an explosive sprint to the finish for one of the comic industry's most beloved titles. Spider Jerusalem is dying, and raging wildly in his final confrontation with The Smiler, proving once and for all how mighty the pen really is. Ellis lets Robertson do his job, allowing the art to tell the story just as much as the dialogue, creating an engaging atmosphere, rocketing the reader to the finish in the fashion of a blockbuster film. We finally say goodbye to the weird 90's cyberpunk City with an all too fitting finale. Read Transmetropolitan. It'll make you want to change the world.

Jack Gattanella

An epic finish, full of laughs, anger, rioting, political unrest (putting it mildly), and a final twist that is so satisfying I dare not think to describe it even in my brain. How will Spider beat the Smiler? The most dastardly way that should be done to such a pig fuck. And Ellis/Robertson and company pull off such a climax with suspense but real catharsis, for the city and world they've created but for Spider too.

Sam Quixote

Spider and the Smiler meet up for a final "interview" and the fate of Spider and his brain disease is revealed.Warren Ellis and Darick Robertson end the series in the tone of the books that went before it, with the kind of bravado and knack for compelling storytelling readers have come to expect from this duo and "One More Time" is a fitting end to this brilliant character.I will say that I felt the showdown with Spider and Smiler, while satisfying, was a bit uninventive in how Spider brings Smiler down - it's a trick that he pulled on the President earlier in the series when he was campaigning and I felt the Smiler's confessions to be a bit drawn out and overlong. And also, if he'd gone that far and was literally holding a gun to Spider's head, why not pull the trigger?That was maybe my only problem with the book, otherwise its righteous words and politics echo through the years, 10 now since it ended, with the same potency as when they were written. And the series holds up really well, I enjoyed this second reading of the series as much as the first time.The little details are hilarious too. Throughout the series there have been little messages of "Free Steve Chung" on the sidewalk screens and in the final issue is a newspaper headline with "Steve Chung Freed!". Spider's garden also spells out "F*** YOU" when looked at from an aerial vantage, and the border guard from issue 1 gets his comeuppance.It ends in the best way possible, I won't spoil it, but it's brilliant and makes me wish Ellis and Robertson would return to do another series with Spider. If you've never read "Transmetropolitan" (and why would you be reading a review of the last book in the series if you haven't?) or, like me, it's been years since you read it, pick it up again and treat yourself to some quality, original comics fare.Spider, you degenerate - I love you. Thanks Warren and Darick for this amazing series!

Benb

Best comic series I've read in a long time

Robert Beveridge

Warren Ellis, Transmetropolitan: One More Time (Vertigo, 2004)There are times when One More Time just feels like it's tying up loose ends. There are times when One More Time is far less subtle than any of the volumes of Transmetropolitan that preceded it. And you know what? Neither of those things mattered to me, and that is about the highest praise I can give this final volume of Warren Ellis' watershed comic series. Ellis has created something of true brilliance with the series, something that manages to be socially conscious and hard-hitting while simultaneously being one of the funniest graphic novels ever to come down the pike, with phenomenal characters and very, very smart writing. If you've never experienced Transmetropolitan, do yourself a favor and pick up the first two books. It's fantastic. ****

Mariana

This is the perfect ending to a wonderful series. The last four volumes are a roller coaster, and Ellis does justice to the trust he's gained from the reader by finishing this the only way he could have, but I still didn't really see it coming.

Chad

This would have been four stars if not for the total padding (of the content and the price) of the final volume with bits of Spider's columns throughout the run of the series added on at the end. It is total fluff added on as little scraps from Jerusalem's brain that add nothing. The guest art is fun to look at, though. This volume had much more action that most of the others that usually had the plot device of "I'm an investigative journalist who has to get this story in ON TIME, damnit!"

Brandt Fundak

this is more a review of the entire run of Transmetropolitan than this volume, which is still really good. it's interesting that Ellis was able to predict the state of today's media over a decade ago. while Spider is an obvious analogue to Hunter S. Thompson, this series was an excellent commentary on how we absorb our news and a cautionary take off what can happen when someone tries to control the medium or the message (or are they the same thing?)

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