Walden and Other Writings

ISBN: 0760734097
ISBN 13: 9780760734094
By: Henry David Thoreau Pete Bradbury

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Reader's Thoughts

Jenifer

From an old journal entry of mine; "Interesting that just now developers are trying to buy Walden Woods for the purpose of building apartments or office buildings or something of the sort. Some popular singing artists, headed by Don Henly are trying to save the woods. I listened to an interview of Mr. Henly recently in which he said that Thoreau was in fact one of our first "environmentalists" and that saving the symbol of this important movement should be first on our list of actions to be taken. It took me awhile to catch on to Thoreau's philosophy and style of writing. I would like to read "Walden" again, especially taking notes of some of his striking comments for quotes."

Fred

Thoreau is kind of a douche. Not gonna lie. This is a guy who thought that he would get back to nature by living in a shack on mommy and daddy's property. He makes some good points of philosophy but so does the drunk at the end of most bars. All in all, I think that Thoreau is vastly overrated.

Jennifer

I am giving 5 stars to "Life without Principle," "On Civil Disobedience," and the following chapters from Walden: Economy, Where I Lived and What I Lived For, Reading, Solitude, Higher Laws, Conclusion. The rest of the book was about nature. While I'm thumbs up when it comes to experiencing nature, I'm thumbs down when it comes to reading about it. I wish I could appreciate the way he describes grass blowing in the wind and ants fighting with each other, but I just couldn't, so I'm not rating his nature writings. His philosophy, however, is great. He can be a sarcastic little bastard too. I didn't learn much from his philosophy, since I already have his beliefs and a very simple lifestyle, albeit not in the woods. But it was very comforting having a dead friend to hang out with for awhile. Everyone considering joining the military should read "On Civil Disobedience" and the Conclusion to Walden. I wish I would've had Henry as a respectable reference the time a date walked out on me for calling military men mindless robots. I wish I would've had Henry as a reference all those times people criticized me for never reading the newspaper or for not owning a home. But I have that sexy pile of bones as a reference now! Oh Henry, I wish I could be the hoe you used on your bean field! Anyway, below are some of my favorite quotes:"In proportion as our inward life fails, we go more constantly and desperately to the post office. You may depend on it, that the poor fellow who walks away with the greatest number of letters, proud of his extensive correspondence, has not heard from himself this long while." (Replace post office with cell phones and blackberries and the world is flooded with inward life failures)."Nations are possessed with an insane ambition to perpetuate the memory of themselves by the amount of hammered stone they leave. What if equal pains were taken to smooth and polish their manners? ....As for the pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs.""To a philosopher all news , as it is called, is gossip, and they who edit and read it are old women over their tea.""The news we hear, for the most part, is not news to our genius. It is the stalest repetition.""What is called politics is comparatively something so superficial and inhuman, that practically I have never fairly recognized that it concerns me at all.""Of what use the friendliest disposition even, if there are no hours given to friendship, if it is forever postponed to unimportant duties and relations?""Public opinion is a weak tyrant compared with our own private opinion. What a man thinks of himself, that it is which determines, or rather indicates, his fate.""The cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it.""...for our houses are such unwieldy property that we are often imprisoned rather than housed in them.""Men have become the tools of their tools.""...be a Columbus to whole new continents and worlds within you, opening new channels, not of trade, but of thought.""Merely to come into the world the heir of a fortune is not to be born, but to be stillborn, rather.""What is it to be born free and not to live free?"

Adam Rabiner

Thoreau's contribution to American letters was not fully appreciated in his time nor even today. Hawthorne and others found him a bore and one of my college friends kind of gagged when I said I was reading Walden and his other writings collected in this book. Yes, Thoreau is not easy reading. But when he is not waxing poetic or citing Greek mythology or Indian Vedas, he's imparting a timeless wisdom and psychologically astute vision for productive living. He's funny, and cantankerous, and his close observations of nature can be beautifully written. I think Walden is a deserved American classic. Thoreau was a truly original thinker and his continuing influence is undeniable. It's a challenging read but you could do worse than learn from this brilliant, anti-authoritarian yet gentle soul.

Chris Wojcik

Henry David Thoreau explores two worlds in Walden. The natural world and the world of the mind. The writing itself is largely divided into these two categories as well. Thoreau will go on for passages analyzing the mind, his ideas about humanity's place in the world, and the workings of society. Then he will turn to pure description, observing the world around him for pages at a time. It is at moments like these that the book becomes trying. I love the ideas that Thoreau muses on regarding humanity and society, but the pages and pages of describing ice melting, or the depths of Walden pond can be a chore to get through. Although, it is worth it. Thoreau's thoughts on living a simple life unburdened by the pressures of society are fascinating, and some of his straight observations can be as well. I loved his description of the ant colony war that he stumbled upon one afternoon.It's a book worth checking out at least once in your life.

Ammie

I did not finish this book. I made it a third of the way through, all the while hoping that perhaps he would begin to talk about actually living in the woods instead of just complaining about how everybody should live in the woods, and then I stopped. Maybe he does later on. But seriously, I got tired of all the whining about other people. Blerg.

Lauren

This collection of essays divulges some terrific themes and axioms; however, it is just too self-indulgent and verbose for me. I have a problem with Thoreau's hypocrisy (given, for example, Thoreau's mom is said to have done his laundry while he was at Walden) and the fact that he spends a whole chapter talking about ants, for example, is a little too much for me.

Jon

This is a classic bit of lit from Mr. Thoreau. I'm only about halfway through Walden, but you get the picture of a stubborn, bitter, sarcastic but brilliant writer who saw through all the technology and modernism of his day. At times, Thoreau waxes quite spiritual, quoting from the Bhagavad Gita and other Eastern texts. If you can muddle through his tangents on Philosophy, excesses of modern man, condemnation of the lack of education, etc. and imagine yourself sharing his airy home on Walden Pond, you will thoroughly enjoy this book!-JR

Gayle J

I didn't care for Thoreau's condescention towards his uneducated neightbors, and I wonder just how solitudinous his time really was since he seemed to have a steady stream of visitors and walked into town almost every day to pick up gossip. I did like the idea of simplicity in life. I just wish Thoreau's style wasn't so dense and self important.

Enamul Haque

In Walden, Thoreau wanted to get the most from his life by determining what was really important, and he did that by removing himself somewhat from the normal life of Concord, Massachusetts in the 1840's. Thoreau focuses a lot on details in his writing. Every sentence the reader reads is filled with captivity. The words he puts on paper come to live as one reads his book. It seems as though he sometimes gets carried away when writing about something, because it almost gets boring, however, the point the he is carrying across is intellectual, and inspirational. Thoreau’s view on life’s necessities being frivolous is almost extreme; however, if one thinks about it, Thoreau is right. Reading about Thoreau and his transcendentalist experience really changed my perspective on a lot of things. There are so many things each person has, half of them that they don’t even need. Thoreau’s experience teaches people a lesson and gives them something to be thankful for without taking anything for granted.

Barrett Brassfield

Have to agree with E.B. White (author of Charlotte's Web, among other things) who once said that every high school senior should be given a copy of Walden upon graduation. Many of course will choose not to read it but for those who do, and make it through the slog that is the first chapter, Thoreau's timeless classic offers much wisdom on thoughtful living. Why thoughtful living? Because Walden is full of what of what buddhists refer to as the fire of attention. Each chapter, even the dreadful first, Economy, is full of an intense attention to detail both philosophical and practical. Walden may have been written by a 19th century New Englander but it's implications travel far beyond that limited scope of time and space. At the very least, readers of Walden in any age will be encouraged to forgo the way of the lemming and instead give a little thought to each step taken in life, as opposed to just mindlessly stumbling off the proverbial cliff of life.

Kathy

I heard a lot about our Mr. Thoreau and wanted to see what he was all about, so my wonderful husband bought me this book.All I can say is I only read the first, extremely long, chapter. I got tired of him patting himself on his genius back and talking about how wrong society was. He has some great ideas, but most of the time I feel his views on life are a little twisted and spoiled. I did not like this book at all and would not recommend it!

David Waterman

The idea of writing a philosophical essay sounds at first to be incredibly self-centered in that it is an assumption of people's interest in your own opinions. However, in this collection of essays (both short and long) by Henry David Thoreau, the author doesn't allow room for opinion. He states his case as matter-of-factly as possible without giving the reader an opportunity to question. Instead of giving a verbose opinion of whatever topic he is covering, Thoreau instead presents his case as pure fact which allows the reader to feel that they're being informed of the truth rather than persuaded to an opinion. The result is a series of informative essays that speak on the human condition and that not only criticize but give hope for a brighter future.

dead letter office

i know i'm supposed to like this book, but i had trouble. walden read in large part like a compilation of shopping lists and an ode to miserliness. and really, thoreau wasn't nearly so far removed from civilization as he seems to have felt he was. there are moments when his philosophizing is worthwhile, but on the whole i thought it was a bit of a cranky, tedious diary.civil disobedience and life without principle are something entirely different, though. if it weren't for the "other writings" this would not have gotten that 3rd star.

Jen

Well, I FINALLY finished this, and I'm glad I did. I had a preconceived notion of Henry David Thoreau as some sort of god of philosophy, with whose every word I would, of course, agree with. Uh-uh. While I did enjoy his writing about nature, I found his tone in the philosophical sections condescending -- especially the part where he's telling a farmer whose house he stops at how wonderful his life would be if he just lived like Thoreau. I agree with his ideas about living life simply and doing one's best to enjoy it, but wow, was he a curmudgeon.

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