Walden and Other Writings

ISBN: 0679600043
ISBN 13: 9780679600046
By: Henry David Thoreau Brooks Atkinson

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About this book

With their call for "simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!”, for self-honesty, and for harmony with nature, the writings of Henry David Thoreau are perhaps the most influential philosophical works in all American literature.The selections in this volume represent Thoreau at his best. Included in their entirety are Walden, his indisputable masterpiece, and his two great arguments for nonconformity, Civil Disobedience and Life Without Principle. A lifetime of brilliant observation of nature--and of himself--is recorded in selections from A Week On The Concord And Merrimack Rivers, Cape Cod, The Maine Woods and The Journal.

Reader's Thoughts

Shana

I've begun this book nearly three times since my 18th birthday and I'm determined to keep it on my night table until I finish it. Not because I'm terribly compelled by it or it's language, but because my fictional main character has read it. :-/ Also, for my own sanity, I am interested to see what philosophical avenues early Americans walked, and perhaps where they've led to today.

Enamul Haque

In Walden, Thoreau wanted to get the most from his life by determining what was really important, and he did that by removing himself somewhat from the normal life of Concord, Massachusetts in the 1840's. Thoreau focuses a lot on details in his writing. Every sentence the reader reads is filled with captivity. The words he puts on paper come to live as one reads his book. It seems as though he sometimes gets carried away when writing about something, because it almost gets boring, however, the point the he is carrying across is intellectual, and inspirational. Thoreau’s view on life’s necessities being frivolous is almost extreme; however, if one thinks about it, Thoreau is right. Reading about Thoreau and his transcendentalist experience really changed my perspective on a lot of things. There are so many things each person has, half of them that they don’t even need. Thoreau’s experience teaches people a lesson and gives them something to be thankful for without taking anything for granted.

David Waterman

The idea of writing a philosophical essay sounds at first to be incredibly self-centered in that it is an assumption of people's interest in your own opinions. However, in this collection of essays (both short and long) by Henry David Thoreau, the author doesn't allow room for opinion. He states his case as matter-of-factly as possible without giving the reader an opportunity to question. Instead of giving a verbose opinion of whatever topic he is covering, Thoreau instead presents his case as pure fact which allows the reader to feel that they're being informed of the truth rather than persuaded to an opinion. The result is a series of informative essays that speak on the human condition and that not only criticize but give hope for a brighter future.

Ashley

If you'd like to read more about what I thought of Walden, visit my blog, Books from Bleh to Basically Amazing.I'm giving this 3 stars, although I feel it probably deserves a 2.5 or so. I was not impressed with Thoreau. I felt that his writing was presumptous and self righteous. He seems to condemn everyone and really speaks sometimes with this annoying air of superiority. I felt that there were many times he rambled on about nothing of importance, and that the 300+ pages could have probably been better written in 100. That being said, I would like to try and reread this book in a few years. There were several little kernels of wisdom that struck me, and a few times that I was really interested in what I was reading, but for the most part, it bored me and I fell asleep or dozed off reading this book far more than any other book I have ever read. Hopefully the next time will be better. I really wanted to like this one!I haven't read all of the other writings in the book, although I've read parts. I should get to those soon. Who knows, maybe starting smaller (Civil Disobedience wasn't so bad...) will be helpful.

Fred

Thoreau is kind of a douche. Not gonna lie. This is a guy who thought that he would get back to nature by living in a shack on mommy and daddy's property. He makes some good points of philosophy but so does the drunk at the end of most bars. All in all, I think that Thoreau is vastly overrated.

Jenifer

From an old journal entry of mine; "Interesting that just now developers are trying to buy Walden Woods for the purpose of building apartments or office buildings or something of the sort. Some popular singing artists, headed by Don Henly are trying to save the woods. I listened to an interview of Mr. Henly recently in which he said that Thoreau was in fact one of our first "environmentalists" and that saving the symbol of this important movement should be first on our list of actions to be taken. It took me awhile to catch on to Thoreau's philosophy and style of writing. I would like to read "Walden" again, especially taking notes of some of his striking comments for quotes."

Chris Wojcik

Henry David Thoreau explores two worlds in Walden. The natural world and the world of the mind. The writing itself is largely divided into these two categories as well. Thoreau will go on for passages analyzing the mind, his ideas about humanity's place in the world, and the workings of society. Then he will turn to pure description, observing the world around him for pages at a time. It is at moments like these that the book becomes trying. I love the ideas that Thoreau muses on regarding humanity and society, but the pages and pages of describing ice melting, or the depths of Walden pond can be a chore to get through. Although, it is worth it. Thoreau's thoughts on living a simple life unburdened by the pressures of society are fascinating, and some of his straight observations can be as well. I loved his description of the ant colony war that he stumbled upon one afternoon.It's a book worth checking out at least once in your life.

Andrea

Love Walden!! It makes me laugh how everyone perceives Thoreau to be a serious writer....but if you really read what he is saying he is very sarcastic and witty. I laughed so hard. He also has a lot of really great insights about life and people. For example, he only spent six weeks of the year working to make money to suppport him for the rest of the year. Sign me up for that work schedule!

Angie

Sublime at times. "There are probably words addressed to our condition exactly, which, if we could really hear and understand would be more salutary than the morning or the spring to our lives...The book exists for us perchance which will explain our miracles and reveal new ones. The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered." But his judgementalism of others is a bit hard to take at times. He thinks himself more pure and conscientious than the farmer down the road whom he accuses of never noticing the sunrise. Tedious at other times.

Adam

If Edgar Allan Poe was the original goth, Henry David Thoreau was the original obnoxious vegan. His tone at the beginning of the book is like a know-it-all kid in his first year of self-employment: smarmy and convinced he's cracked the code on the only right way to live. As the book goes on, he mellows out a little. I guess living in the woods was good for him. While still being condescending of his neighbors (“…his little broad-faced son worked cheerfully at his father's side the while, not knowing how poor a bargain the latter had made”), it’s the side-stories, like meeting fishermen, ice-cutters and packs of free-roving hounds, and the native american legends of the lake, that make up the parts worth reading. I wanted to like this book, because I appreciate how it’s inspired some people I respect (Don Henley?), but it was so difficult to read, it put me to sleep every time I tried to read a page until I switched to the audio version.

Adam Rabiner

Thoreau's contribution to American letters was not fully appreciated in his time nor even today. Hawthorne and others found him a bore and one of my college friends kind of gagged when I said I was reading Walden and his other writings collected in this book. Yes, Thoreau is not easy reading. But when he is not waxing poetic or citing Greek mythology or Indian Vedas, he's imparting a timeless wisdom and psychologically astute vision for productive living. He's funny, and cantankerous, and his close observations of nature can be beautifully written. I think Walden is a deserved American classic. Thoreau was a truly original thinker and his continuing influence is undeniable. It's a challenging read but you could do worse than learn from this brilliant, anti-authoritarian yet gentle soul.

Matthew K.

Still reading.......very slowly. Walden is a classic; A Week on the Concord and Merrimack is intriguing because it was the author's first book and about taking a canoe trip with his brother (which I've done a time or two); his text is highly quotable and his philosophies foreshadow his later writing....however, he hardly mentions his brother which demonstrates how detached he could be from others around him.

Lauren

This collection of essays divulges some terrific themes and axioms; however, it is just too self-indulgent and verbose for me. I have a problem with Thoreau's hypocrisy (given, for example, Thoreau's mom is said to have done his laundry while he was at Walden) and the fact that he spends a whole chapter talking about ants, for example, is a little too much for me.

Bridget

Walden isn't an easy read - the first section in particular is long, dense, and occasionally annoying. But it's also very quotable, and later sections are filled with wonderful images. I'm not usually one for descriptive writing, but I've marked passages in this book just for their loveliness. In short, it's worth the attempt. Even if you don't get far, you'll get to read some great stuff.

Kathy

I heard a lot about our Mr. Thoreau and wanted to see what he was all about, so my wonderful husband bought me this book.All I can say is I only read the first, extremely long, chapter. I got tired of him patting himself on his genius back and talking about how wrong society was. He has some great ideas, but most of the time I feel his views on life are a little twisted and spoiled. I did not like this book at all and would not recommend it!

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